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Deer rifle for a novice hunter

>>Did you mean 1/4 "

I cannot speak for the poster on his group size, but myself I cannot shoot iron sights all that well.
Maybe the gun had iron sights on it, or maybe the 4 inch group was from a particular shooting position.

If I could shoot 4 inches at 100 with iron sights, I would be happy enough.

Perhaps he will clarify.
Cheers - Jody
 
Try shooting some different guns and seeing what you like. For hunting in TN, a 30-30 lever action or any of the cartridges for larger game will do the job. Unless you hunting over a field/pasture you aren't going to be making really long shots anyway. I would choose a cartridge that costs less so you can practice cheaper, preferably one with lower recoil if that bothers you any.
Buying used was a good suggestion, but I would have someone with you that can check it out. Most rifles would be fine, but you don't want to get the one that just so happens to have a ton of mileage on it.

I rarely hunted when I was younger (which I regret now), so until recently my only deer rifle was a 30-30 with a cheap scope. I just got a left handed 6.5 Creedmoor and I'm looking forward to trying it out when I have the opportunity.
 

Esox

I didnt know
Ambassador
Do the inexpensive plastic stocked guns change point of impact with sling pressure?

They can yep. One of the weak links in budget rifles is the stock, especially the material and bedding of the action to the stock. Just because the stock has flex in it doesnt mean it wont shoot decent groups though. What matters is how the action is bedded to the stock, not the barrel as much.

My nephews budget Remington below, 7mm Mag. I cant remember which one it is, I think its the 783.

500d8d67b3f0d4cb1efe9a7f36781a4053d295e9.jpg

Its in dire need of a bedding job and I'll bet it'll shoot just fine after its done.

With that said, I'd suggest a Savage AXIS, with scope for $495. In either .270 Winchester or .25-06.

Savage Arms - SAV AXIS II XP - https://savagearms.com/content?p=firearms&a=product_summary&s=57097
 
I bought my rifle in the dark ages when gun stocks were made of wood. I read an article somewhere, long ago, where a guy glued metal files in the plastic stock (out by the barrel) to make it stiff. I put that idea in the file manager between my ears... for future reference.
 

Esox

I didnt know
Ambassador
I bought my rifle in the dark ages when gun stocks were made of wood. I read an article somewhere, long ago, where a guy glued metal files in the plastic stock (out by the barrel) to make it stiff. I put that idea in the file manager between my ears... for future reference.
The synthetic stock on my Sako TRG-S in .338 Lapua will flex in a tight sling, but it doesnt affect the accuracy because the barrel is free floated and the action is bedded very well.

Simply retorquing the action screws can make a drastic difference in accuracy. I've seen rifles that had action screws so tight they needed to be put in a vise with a wrench on a square shafted screwdriver to loosen them. Action screws that tight can torque the action. A simple retorque to normal tightness shrunk group size considerably.

My Sako AIII Deluxe .270 Winchester thats older than I am, has an oiled business card shim between barrel and fore end tip. It puts Federal Premium 150 grain Noslers in one ragged hole at 100.

Rifles are very much individuals. What it takes to really make some shoot can be very simple and easy. Others can take more work than their worth.
 
This is the model Savage I have Mine has an old Weaver K4 with Lee dot reticule. Rifle is chambered in .300 Savage, very similar to .308 Win.

image_zpssb6w0veh.jpg
 
Indeed I'm curious. If you haven't pulled the trigger (ayoo) yet, I'd suggest 243 winchester. Great ballistics, superb accuracy, affordable rounds and rifles.

I use a 7.7 Arisaka type 99 lol. 30-06's angry asian cousin. My mid war rifle is a tack driver.
 
A good friend and avid hunter told me to not waste the $$, buy a Savage with an acutrigger. He has many expensive nice guns to choose from and said the Savage is a nail driver. I took his advice and purchased a .243 Savage, I think it was around $200 at the time. I absolutely love that gun! It is accurate as hell (at 100 yards, consistantly inside of 4" group), comfortable to shoot and I don't worry about it in the field.

IMO, you can't go wrong with a Savage! Awesome rifle!
Yes! A Savage in 243 Win is a nice caliber for deer in a cost-effective (and quality) rifle. I would get the Model 10 and not the lower-end Axis. Not to mention that Savage has scoped rifles that are ready to go out of the box. I have a similar model in 308 Win:


Some places do not allow rifle; in that case you need a rifled slug shotgun. A Remington or Mossberg pump 20 gauge with a rifled barrel works nicely. 12 gauge for a rifled slug is too much. The barrels will either have iron sights or a cantilever mount for a scope or red dot. [EDIT] ok - not a concern in TN. But, if you have a 20 gauge with a couple of barrels, you could hunt deer and upland birds with the same gun.

And finally, for dense woods and close shots, a lever with iron sights action in 30/30 is a good choice. Henry, Marlin, Winchester; any of these would work.
 
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The reason I asked about your rifle experience is that standard rifle calibers can take getting used to. 30.30 will not kick a lot, but 308 30.06 types bark pretty hard for the unitiated.
Yes. I have shot a rifle for a number of years and 30-06 is my limit. I think 243 Win is all you need (and plus some) for deer-sized game.

If you do want to get a rifle that will handle bigger game as well; then yes 308 Win/30-06/270 Win are all good. I like 308 better because you can get away with a shorter barrel rifle on that short cartridge (20" barrel works and makes for a handy rifle), and the action is shorter on the bolt. For 30-06 or any related caliber (25-06, 270 Win, etc.) you really want a 22" or 24" barrel.
 
Yes. I have shot a rifle for a number of years and 30-06 is my limit. I think 243 Win is all you need (and plus some) for deer-sized game.

If you do want to get a rifle that will handle bigger game as well; then yes 308 Win/30-06/270 Win are all good. I like 308 better because you can get away with a shorter barrel rifle on that short cartridge (20" barrel works and makes for a handy rifle), and the action is shorter on the bolt. For 30-06 or any related caliber (25-06, 270 Win, etc.) you really want a 22" or 24" barrel.
I thought that about the 30-06 being an limit, probably because my first rifle was a Win 70 featherweight in 30-06. When dad and I first tried it we used 180gr factory loads on a hot summer day. I was only wearing a t shirt and it tore up my shoulder. I went home and we got a recoil pad and installed without removing any wood, the pad plus extra length helped a lot. A few years ago I picked up pretty CZ Safari American in 375 H&H, The size and weight, plus a wide factory recoil pad make for a rather tame rifle, it really kicks less than that old Win 70 30-06
 
Yes. I have shot a rifle for a number of years and 30-06 is my limit. I think 243 Win is all you need (and plus some) for deer-sized game.

If you do want to get a rifle that will handle bigger game as well; then yes 308 Win/30-06/270 Win are all good. I like 308 better because you can get away with a shorter barrel rifle on that short cartridge (20" barrel works and makes for a handy rifle), and the action is shorter on the bolt. For 30-06 or any related caliber (25-06, 270 Win, etc.) you really want a 22" or 24" barrel.
Good post. I own a 24" savage in .270 and a Remington 700 Police with a 20" in .308. I think 30.06 is a great all around, just never felt like I wanted it or needed it.
 

Esox

I didnt know
Ambassador
I do not find the need for rifling or rifle sights for slugs.
Where I live there is no rifle season for deer so shotgun was it.

My only shotgun for the first 20 years of my hunting career was an old Belgian Browning Auto 5. From ducks to deer it did it all, without fail, in any conditions. 28" full choke barrel with a plain bead and it killed every deer I ever pointed it at with the old Imperial Foster type slugs. Geese with #5 lead, ducks and grouse with #7 1/2 lead.

When they changed to steel shot here I retired it and bought my Remington 11-87 SPS-T.

With a rifled tube shots on deer I would have had to pass on, beyond ~50 yards, were easily in range. It just has a plain bead front sight, but because of the rifled choke tube, it will put 3 sabots into a 12x12 inch target at 100 offhand without any problem at all. It has a 21" barrel that makes it much quicker and handier, especially in the thick stuff.

If I could only have one gun to do everything, it would be that little Remington.

Remington 11-87 SPS-T .JPG
 

Bhugo

Contributor
Where I live there is no rifle season for deer so shotgun was it.

My only shotgun for the first 20 years of my hunting career was an old Belgian Browning Auto 5. From ducks to deer it did it all, without fail, in any conditions. 28" full choke barrel with a plain bead and it killed every deer I ever pointed it at with the old Imperial Foster type slugs. Geese with #5 lead, ducks and grouse with #7 1/2 lead.

When they changed to steel shot here I retired it and bought my Remington 11-87 SPS-T.

With a rifled tube shots on deer I would have had to pass on, beyond ~50 yards, were easily in range. It just has a plain bead front sight, but because of the rifled choke tube, it will put 3 sabots into a 12x12 inch target at 100 offhand without any problem at all. It has a 21" barrel that makes it much quicker and handier, especially in the thick stuff.

If I could only have one gun to do everything, it would be that little Remington.

View attachment 1039959
Nice shotgun!
 
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