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convince me why I need a 240mm kitchen knife

Hello fellow B&B knife enthusiasts

Looking to get a new kitchen knife. Up until now, I've used the 210mm variety. After doing some research it seems like a lot of people like the 240mm versions. What are the advantages of the longer blade? If it matters, i'm looking at Japanese Gyoto styles. I'm also just using it for home use, not professional.
 

ChefJohnBoy-ardee

Contributor
You don't need one if you are happy with your 210 and don't find yourself running out of knife/leverage/blade stroke length...

But this is B&B, buy a milliongof them! ;)
 
I've found that the width of the blade matters more than the length at a certain point. I adore my Nakiri style, as I find the point on a chefs knife is irrelevant and gets in the way more than not. Also, with the flat end, it works great to scoop up your chopped veggies like a spatula and toss them directly into your pan.
 

Legion

Moderator Emeritus
Having a big chef knife can actually be impractical if you have a smaller kitchen and space is at a premium. If you have room for the big cutting board to match the big knife go nuts.
 

ChefJohnBoy-ardee

Contributor
I need a 270 at work but only for chopping herbs :D It isn't worth the money to have a 270 to just sit in my bag to save me a few minutes everyday while chopping my 2 cups of fresh parsley.
 
I need a 270 at work but only for chopping herbs :D It isn't worth the money to have a 270 to just sit in my bag to save me a few minutes everyday while chopping my 2 cups of fresh parsley.
I've never really had a problem with the 210 but there are a lot of recommendations for a 240. The advantages I've heard are, it's a better slicer for bigger foods, Gives a little more height for rock chopping and are generally a little taller at the heel.

Kitchen space isn't a problem for me and I have the tools available to make a cutting board to fit the bigger knife. Just wondering how much of a difference there is because it seems a lot of people, who really use knives, recommend the 240 over the 210.
 
Do you find yourself needing any of the above?
No, but what I don't know might be hurting me without me even knowing it. :)

I'm glad you posted in this thread because i'm looking for real world experience. let me ask you this. If you were limited to one chef knife ( whichever style ), for home kitchen use, and could only choose between 210 and 240, which one would you choose and why? And do you feel there's a difference simply because of the length?

I don't think I can go wrong with either but I haven't used a 240 before so I don't know what that particular length brings to the equation.
 

ChefJohnBoy-ardee

Contributor
You have sold yourself on getting one.

If I only had one knife at work it would be a 240. Ie used one for years. 210 seem short to me but if you are used to a 210 a 240 may seem long. I use whatever is handy... I use ny Tojiro bread knife the most in all honesty.
 
Not really sold on anything, just trying to understand the differences. If you're saying 210 would be short, what does that mean? What does a longer blade do for me that a shorter blade won't( in a home kitchen setting )?

Again I have no experience with a blade longer than 210. If a lot of people are recommending a 240 there must be some difference, even if it's minuscule.
 

ChefJohnBoy-ardee

Contributor
Not really sold on anything, just trying to understand the differences. If you're saying 210 would be short, what does that mean? What does a longer blade do for me that a shorter blade won't( in a home kitchen setting )?

Again I have no experience with a blade longer than 210. If a lot of people are recommending a 240 there must be some difference, even if it's minuscule.
a 210 would seem short to me on how I would hold my arm. It would also be a longer stroke on a rocking slice. I would get used to it quick and not notice after that... My nakiri isn't very long but with the blade being more flat I'm using a straight up and down more than a slice.

Different strokes for different folks. If you're happy with a 210 and not finding yourself wanting for more knife while slicing things you are fine. If you are finding yourself wanting more knife on a stroke then I would get the 240.

I can do about everything I need to do with a paring knife. It isn't the best but I can make it work.
 
that 240 is very long. Nice? Yes, maybe. I have one and it's just too much at home. I'm going 210 and below from now on.

that's been my expensive lesson to learn.
 
My Shun is 8" and I rarely wanted a longer blade. When I cut watermelon I always wanted a longer blade. There were a few times over the 4 years I've owned my Shun that I wished I the knife was longer outside of working with watermelon so I bought a 240mm gyuto when I was ready for a new knife. I think 8" is perfect for a Euro or hybrid profile and I really like my 240mm Gyuto. I don't know if I'd prefer it over a 210mm since I've never used one, but I bet either would be great for normal use. I've used longer western style knives and don't really care for anything beyond 8". They start to feel a little big beyond that. My 240mm feels like my 8" Shun, which I guess is due to the shape of the blade.

I know that whole bit is almost useless because it's all "I like" and "It feels like xxx to me" instead of facts, but when it comes down to picking a knife at this quality level it really comes down to opinion and intangibles.
 
My Shun is 8" and I rarely wanted a longer blade. When I cut watermelon I always wanted a longer blade. There were a few times over the 4 years I've owned my Shun that I wished I the knife was longer outside of working with watermelon so I bought a 240mm gyuto when I was ready for a new knife. I think 8" is perfect for a Euro or hybrid profile and I really like my 240mm Gyuto. I don't know if I'd prefer it over a 210mm since I've never used one, but I bet either would be great for normal use. I've used longer western style knives and don't really care for anything beyond 8". They start to feel a little big beyond that. My 240mm feels like my 8" Shun, which I guess is due to the shape of the blade.

I know that whole bit is almost useless because it's all "I like" and "It feels like xxx to me" instead of facts, but when it comes down to picking a knife at this quality level it really comes down to opinion and intangibles.
That makes a lot of sense. Now that you mention it I did read some info about a Gyuto style seeming small for it's size and some people saying the 240 felt more like a 210 western. Thanks for the post :thumbup1:
 
You don't. Some people are comfortable with the 10" chef knives. I like them, but will always prefer the 8" knives. To me, there's no job that you can do with the 10" but can not with the 8." And the maneuverability with the 8" knife is unbeatable. I do not use pairing knives, or many speciality knives unless for a very specific reason. I have worked many a 12 hour shift in the kitchen using ONLY one 8" chef knife and performed great. Get a couple knives in your hand and see what feels right for you.
 
I love my 8" chef knife. I have a 12" and 14" for very specialized carving, I do most everything under the sun with an 8".
 

ouch

Moderator Emeritus
convince me why I need a 240mm kitchen knife
Simple- if you have a 210mm you need a longer one; if you have a 270mm you need a shorter one.

Seriously, if you're used to typical German knives (Henckels, Wusthof, etc.) you'll find the Japanese versions so light and nimble that it's a good idea to go "up one size".
 
As someone who teaches cooking. I'd ask you 2 questions. First is how big are you and second why Japanese?

Knives are tools and an extension of your hand. The weight behind the knife as well as the weight of the knife itself are important.

I'm 6'1" and like a 10" knife. I prefer the German models as typically they weigh more and therefore work more. ie they cut through with less effort. They rock, essential for a large number of cutting techniques.

Henkels and Wustoff make great knives. If you go with Henkels. Be sure to get one with the twins not one with just the single guy... I personally use Wustoff Grand Prix, but the Henkels 4 Star would be my second choice.

Don't buy anything without holding it in your hand. Is it balanced when you hold it? Does it rock smoothly?

Don't get me wrong. I love some Japanese blades too. But holding it and knowing its purpose is key.
 
Ultimately i'm just looking to get something different. I already have the German/western style knives covered. I have smaller knives as well as cleavers and boning varieties. I've just always wanted to try a Japanese knife. In these styles, most people are recommending the 240. I think ouch is correct when he says people tend to go up in size. I've heard people say that their 210 Japanese looked smaller than the western 210.

I'm 6'0 185
 
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