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What TV series you watching?

The Investigation on HBO. It concerns the death of a reporter on a private submarine that happened in Denmark a few years ago.
It's pretty slow and methodical and I don't think I like it.

30 coins, also on HBO is much better. In Spanish with subtitles. It's good fun.
 

Rhody

I'm a Lumberjack.
The Investigation on HBO. It concerns the death of a reporter on a private submarine that happened in Denmark a few years ago.
It's pretty slow and methodical and I don't think I like it.

30 coins, also on HBO is much better. In Spanish with subtitles. It's good fun.
I’ll check both of these out.
Still watching
Kominsky Method
 

The Knize

Moderator Emeritus
It's almost like the writers were only TOLD about the original books and the TV program. Sad.
That really does seem sad. Big spread on Rotten Tomatoes between the critic ratings (96) and the user ratings (76), which is always a sign to me of something really amiss and it makes me question the impartiality of "the critics." The user reviews seem to say things similar to what you all are saying. One user review quotes the director as saying he was putting "a fresh modern perspective" on the remake. I suppose the books did come out in the 1930s to 1950s. But, still, I would say, write your own original screenplay if you want, but don't try to draw in fans of the original with the title. Hrrrumph!

I thought Kominsky Method was quite good.
 

FarmerTan

George Bailey Fanboy
Haven't watched more then 20 minutes of TV in probably 15 years. Too busy with actually doing things. Heck, I didn't post on B&B with any regularity for probably 5 years. Only here now because the weather has been intolerable.
I actually only watch TV because I aspire to be a TV writer. Or a critic.....but from my research it appears that we don't have to actually watch TV to critique it!
 

FarmerTan

George Bailey Fanboy
That really does seem sad. Big spread on Rotten Tomatoes between the critic ratings (96) and the user ratings (76), which is always a sign to me of something really amiss and it makes me question the impartiality of "the critics." The user reviews seem to say things similar to what you all are saying. One user review quotes the director as saying he was putting "a fresh modern perspective" on the remake. I suppose the books did come out in the 1930s to 1950s. But, still, I would say, write your own original screenplay if you want, but don't try to draw in fans of the original with the title. Hrrrumph!

I thought Kominsky Method was quite good.
The books were written in the 70's and early? 80's I believe. But I read that exact quote before I watched the series. I didn't really want to post here for fear of showing that I'm not "woke" but that is the main problem with the new rendering. And it seems they are trying to compress too many stories into one show. There is none of Siegfried blowing up at James, and then doing the same thing himself.... Too many MAIN characters and not enough time to focus. Ok, get off my lawn!
 

The Knize

Moderator Emeritus
The books were written in the 70's and early? 80's I believe
Sorry. I misread or misremembered the Wikipedia entry on James Herriot which actually says: "He is best known for writing a series of eight books set in the 1930s–1950s Yorkshire Dales about veterinary practice, animals, and their owners, which began with If Only They Could Talk, first published in 1970."

So you are correct, Sir! The first film was apparently 1975 and the first BBC series of 90 episodes, 1978-80 and 1988-90, unless I am again misreading Wikipedia.

I would generally consider myself fairly "woke" but I do not really know the books or the series to really follow what the director was trying to freshen and modernize. But, really, the books were written in the 1970s or so, not the 1870s!
 

haggis

Contributor
We must always have at least one Scandi-noir series on the watchlist. Finished Deadwind and just started Borderland.

Gutted that we ran out of Money Heist seasons, and on that note!
 

FarmerTan

George Bailey Fanboy
Sorry. I misread or misremembered the Wikipedia entry on James Herriot which actually says: "He is best known for writing a series of eight books set in the 1930s–1950s Yorkshire Dales about veterinary practice, animals, and their owners, which began with If Only They Could Talk, first published in 1970."

So you are correct, Sir! The first film was apparently 1975 and the first BBC series of 90 episodes, 1978-80 and 1988-90, unless I am again misreading Wikipedia.

I would generally consider myself fairly "woke" but I do not really know the books or the series to really follow what the director was trying to freshen and modernize. But, really, the books were written in the 1970s or so, not the 1870s!
If you like easy to read, heart warming reads , "All Creatures Great and Small" is really one of my favorites. The subsequent ones were almost equally well done, but all first rate.
 

ajkel64

The Aussie Bulldog
Moderator
The Bay Season 2 from the BBC. I enjoyed the first Season so hopefully this Season won’t disappoint.
 

The Knize

Moderator Emeritus
If you like easy to read, heart warming reads
Judging by what I have been posting about on B&B lately I seem to like dark, sometimes difficult, heart-wrenching reads! :)

We just finished the first episode of Deadwind. I feel completely hooked already! Scandinavian noir seems spot on.
 
I've been trying to find a Danish series - The Bridge for free. It's more Scandinavian noir. It's on Prime, but you have to pay for it.
They did an American version and it was on AMC I believe, but it only lasted 2 seasons. It was very good so not sure why it didn't last.
 
Still bored and annoyed with Picard, episode 5, I think. None of the original series would have featured a scene with someone having his eye surgically removed without anesthetic.

This ain't Star Trek. It has the name and the character and planet names, and there are tiny nods to the fans ("tranya" the drink is mentioned). But it's not Trek as we know and love it.
 

FarmerTan

George Bailey Fanboy
Still bored and annoyed with Picard, episode 5, I think. None of the original series would have featured a scene with someone having his eye surgically removed without anesthetic.

This ain't Star Trek. It has the name and the character and planet names, and there are tiny nods to the fans ("tranya" the drink is mentioned). But it's not Trek as we know and love it.
Yes, I've heard it's a strange, boring werld my friend.
 
I'm currently watching season 5 of Luther. Idris Elba is excellent in the role and I've enjoyed the whole series so far. They're short seasons so this series is pretty easy to digest.
 
Yes, I've heard it's a strange, boring werld my friend.
That said . . .

Episode 7 did feel more like the real Trek. Yes, there was a lot of the doom-and-gloom, the bluish-gray lighting and sterile sets, and characters that are hard to like or understand. But "Nepenthe" suddenly warms everything with a long and beautiful sequence featuring Will Riker, "Number One," and his wife Deanna Troi the former Enterprise counselor, plus their lively pre-teen daughter. Suddenly there is humor and human connections, and characters that live and breathe, and scenes you don't want to end.

This one was co-written by novelist Michael Chabon, a co-creator of the new series. I'd say the improvement here was due to him, except that he wrote or co-wrote one or two of the preceding dull episodes too. "Is a puzzlement." But at least this episode felt in part like Trek!
 
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