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Personal question about straight shaving

I recently returned to DE after a 37 year hiatus. Am thinking of going truly old school w/a straight edge, like my grandfathers used. I've seen ads for blunt edges for practice, which seems to make sense. Any suggestions as to razors? Soaps or creams? What about aftershaves? Should I keep a styptic pencil handy? Best brushes? Any suggestions would be most welcome. Thanks.
 
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You can spend $100 or thousands on razors, brushes, soaps, creams...etc. There are so many choices. Some begin with the least inexpensive setup to test the waters others buy the most luxurious setup. What is your budget?
 
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Disinfect the razor - you should do that even with a new one. There has been some fairy tale hand wringing about not wanting a used razor because there may be germs on it but it is just steel and plastic (or whatever). The new ones (cartridge, DE, or straight) are not sterile, either. Use Barbicide, soak it for a while, clean it, lube it, use it. If you really think steel can carry germs after it has been cleaned and disinfected, then don't eat at a restaurant, go to a hospital, dentist, or eat off a BBQ.
 
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+1. This certainly puts a stop to any future plans I'd have for ever buying a used razor as well!!

Heh... that is funny. Now that I think about it, I can get my mind to imagine all kinds of things. However, I'm still comfortable with Barbicide. Dead is dead... Clean is clean. Besides... I only have a few new razors. The bulk of my collection is vintage stuff (not counting the Gold Dollar hoard that I own).
 
Thanks, but I think I'll just go with a new razor. No telling where these used ones have been.

There is something for everyone out there and for every budget. If you review past posts you will discover the vast majority, dare I say nearly all of the razors bought and sold here are used and have had a Barbicide Bath.
 
Barbicide apparently kills HIV-1, Hep B, and Hep C.

I've been using rubbing alcohol. That is good for germs, but not so good for viruses. I'm going to try and get some Barbicide and use it as well (although I'm not sure where from here... )

With a bath of those two things I would be very confident that a blade was "clean".
 
Seems like a fresh hone-job with bevel set would get rid of whatever cooties, no? Any old razor I get always gets that treatment.
 
It probably would. Probably.... But I would still give it a bath of something.

Viruses don't have an indefinite life outside the body, especially in a dry environment like a razor. Even the tough boogers like Hep-A should be long gone after a few days with no moisture to keep it going. Germs, on the other hand might be more of an issue.

I figure it doesn't take long to give the razor a bath, so I do it just to make myself feel better.

You would obviously not want to use a razor right after someone else unless you were very comfortable with their cooties.
 
Barbicide apparently kills HIV-1, Hep B, and Hep C.

It is definitely 'highly effective' against all strains, but absolutely NOT a guarantor of the elimination thereof, as is an autoclave or using a razor which has yet to interact with tissue, and they make no such claim. Potentially survives months in a state invisible to the human eye and still contaminate another. Honing is not a guarantor to eliminate the risk.
 
Pharmacists use methyl alcohol when compounding injectable drugs. Only a small amount (I think .5% or something like that) in the solution is needed to render complete sterility in a matter of hours. And this is the standard for substances meant to be injected, often deep into a muscle. I can't imagine barbicide being any less effective than methyl alcohol.

A half gallon of Barbicide is $21.99 at Sally's. For $26.99 you can have a nice classic looking barbershop style barbicide soaking jar for marinating your razors.

One cheap source of methyl alcohol is "HEET", a fuel additive. There are a couple or three different formulations. You want, I think, the red bottle. AutoZone carries it. Rinse the stuff off well before putting a soaked razor away, as this is NOT pharmaceutical grade or even technical grade and there may be impurities in it. A good rinse though and you should be good to go with HEET. Very handy stuff. Even works for lighting off a primus stove or a pump type kerosene lantern.
 
As much as I love the superior shave (where I got my first Silverwing from) - I hold my grain of salt listening to a seller of new razors highlight the trouble of old razors.

Honestly, on dry steel, nothing is going to survive very long at all. And if this is a factor, Maybe Pierre in the TI factory who has hepatitis nicked his finger when packaging up your brand new razor. The risks are the same as old toothless pete in 1910 nicking his hepatitis riddled face while shaving, and packaging up his razor, never to be used again.

What does this mean? Common sense must prevail! (which can be read as so long as you don't use a bloody wet razor you'll be fine)
 
Pharmacists use methyl alcohol when compounding injectable drugs. Only a small amount (I think .5% or something like that) in the solution is needed to render complete sterility in a matter of hours. And this is the standard for substances meant to be injected, often deep into a muscle. I can't imagine barbicide being any less effective than methyl alcohol.

A half gallon of Barbicide is $21.99 at Sally's. For $26.99 you can have a nice classic looking barbershop style barbicide soaking jar for marinating your razors.

One cheap source of methyl alcohol is "HEET", a fuel additive. There are a couple or three different formulations. You want, I think, the red bottle. AutoZone carries it. Rinse the stuff off well before putting a soaked razor away, as this is NOT pharmaceutical grade or even technical grade and there may be impurities in it. A good rinse though and you should be good to go with HEET. Very handy stuff. Even works for lighting off a primus stove or a pump type kerosene lantern.

Might just correct you there. I believe the red bottle is Isopropyl alcohol. The yellow bottle is methanol. Probably not so important in relation to this discussion, but it might be an important distinction for other applications.
 
You would obviously not want to use a razor right after someone else unless you were very comfortable with their cooties.

I checked my Wavicide (2% glutaraldehyde sterilant) and it doesn't mention killing those pesky Aussie Cooties! :blink:

Gee, if used/vintage str8s, after high-level disinfecting, are "dangerous" ... wouldn't used/vintage DE & SE razors be too ... after all, you may change the blades but the frame remains the same! :001_huh:
 
Try Clippercide in the orange can that barbers use to clean there clippers before every cut. It kills everything and its an aerosal and a rust inhibitor. Try that one on for size it works everytime in ten minutes.
 
Might just correct you there. I believe the red bottle is Isopropyl alcohol. The yellow bottle is methanol. Probably not so important in relation to this discussion, but it might be an important distinction for other applications.

Ah. Okay I might have them confused. But actually I think it is important. Methyl alcohol is much better at killing stuff than isopropyl. So I guess buyer beware and read the label.
 
Seems like a fresh hone-job with bevel set would get rid of whatever cooties, no? Any old razor I get always gets that treatment.

If you first hand sand the entire blade progressively up to 2000 grit and then polish with a felt wheel on a dremel loaded with 1u, .5u, and .25 or .1u diamond, you should be good to go. Just sand and polish off those pesky microbes along with the rust and corrosion and patina. You get a bright, shiny mirror finish in the bargain.
 
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