What's new
  • Welcome back Guest!
    If you have been away from our site you may have to request a new password. Simply click on the link for "lost" password in the log in page.
    Thank you.
  • Guest
    The BST is now open, please note the changes in our guidelines to address the recent fraudulent activity. Ensure you read the guidelines prior to creating a sale thread in the Buy-Sell-Trade forum with special attention to the new photo and payment requirements.
    Thank you for your patience and understanding.

Charnley Forest show off your Charnwood

Not a new stone, but had this one out doing some honing and wanted to try and capture it a little better wet. Still can’t really see the under pattern that I see when wet.

0877F3FD-39AD-49DA-B63C-428701527C79.jpeg 35C4F6A7-415F-4E44-A2AE-5CA5F95A2EBE.jpeg 2CEF9E82-ED8D-4948-A306-613549684272.jpeg F6BAC980-C9E6-4783-929D-8A63EC60C51F.jpeg 51946D3F-1896-4907-AA3B-6198D238ADBC.jpeg 712C8666-83C2-44E0-871E-B143A05AAE4A.jpeg
 

David

The Fur Burglar!
Moderator Emeritus
Have you tried it with oil. I have a similar looking one that is useless with water but much much better with oil.
Yes sir. I’ve never been a fan of water on hard novaculite, so I always use oil. When I get time I’m going to rough the surface up a bit and see what that does.
 
I think I rescued my first Charnwood from one of my pickers. Seller told me it was a Hard Ark, sent me a bad picture but said to myself “Yeeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaaah, I think I’ll take it”. Came in a nicely oxidized walnut box. Measures approximately 9x2”, has a irregular shape and a rounded bottom. Has a heavy layer of what I am guessing is the famous English glue I have read about. Need a good cleaning and lap. Has a slight dish, not too bad but this sucked feel hard. Might be a bear lapping. My knife barely scratched it. It is going to me a good looker and great honing potential

Besides chipping or scraping, how would the glue be removed?

0EDEAD04-3A68-4D40-9675-700F7A792086.jpeg 536A8219-C409-40F3-B490-247FCC949673.jpeg 41A7615B-6229-4D0C-B6E0-17CBD7E9AA4C.jpeg 7CACE1F2-2C7E-460D-BDB3-2CBA339F11D2.jpeg 9AEDCBD0-79BF-42DC-90BC-7E6B587A3CB1.jpeg F5B0DED0-FA64-4AA1-8FA9-55ADD6352B2B.jpeg 6ED90E1B-8BDE-4016-BAEC-1038FA2F70CB.jpeg
 
Great one Tim. Yeah getting that stuff off just sucks. Is it red glue? I thought about trying acetone to see what it would do, but just chipped and scrapped it of instead. I would use sic to flatten that puppy. You could try rubbing with sic on the glue to see if it removes it.
 
Nice Charn! Pick away at that putty. I haven’t been brave enough to try any serious solvents myself. Or just don’t and lap and put back in its little coffin.
 
Thanks all for the nice words. Been patiently waiting till I found a wild Charn to play with. The bottom funk is orange with some white filler-plaster. Like honing, I remover 90% of the funk in 10% of the time using a dull whittling knife. But it is a suckage chore. Now have it soaking in a green bath to remove some oil buildup on the sides above the wood. Looking forward to taking for a test drive
 
What a difference a day makes. Under all the funk, there is one beauty of a stone. Gave it a good bath to remove any oil sludge. Worked the bottom with a wire brush to remove most of the remaining cement. Spot treated with a scotchbright pad and 220 W/D to finish off without being to aggressive. It has some tool marks (chisel??) on the side that I wanted to conserve. Lapped up to 600 to see where it stands. It was hard lapping, but not trans ark hard and like the results. All the colors and veins are popping. It is a looker, now to see how it performs

89E3F48D-51AE-4999-9E17-5168ED1105AA.jpeg 9327DC0B-A565-4636-AFB8-299B98D761FA.jpeg F6BB5F8F-B0C5-46EB-BA2E-746754FC5257.jpeg 7891E8AC-124E-427F-A3D6-9701A6434B1E.jpeg 09B3514D-24B7-4E8A-BFDE-E0A3816C47C6.jpeg 81F29ABD-4397-476D-8F01-C742EE29A91C.jpeg DE5FECBD-BF1F-4518-960A-02311B29981E.jpeg
 
What a difference a day makes. Under all the funk, there is one beauty of a stone. Gave it a good bath to remove any oil sludge. Worked the bottom with a wire brush to remove most of the remaining cement. Spot treated with a scotchbright pad and 220 W/D to finish off without being to aggressive. It has some tool marks (chisel??) on the side that I wanted to conserve. Lapped up to 600 to see where it stands. It was hard lapping, but not trans ark hard and like the results. All the colors and veins are popping. It is a looker, now to see how it performs

View attachment 1107334 View attachment 1107335 View attachment 1107336 View attachment 1107338 View attachment 1107339 View attachment 1107340 View attachment 1107341
Very very similar to one of mine in terms of colour.

If it's any help: I lapped mine a bit higher - to 1000 grit. I use it with water. Sometimes I raise a slurry on it. It's my favourite CF and follows beautifully on from Welsh slates, producing the sweetest edge.

I hope yours hones well. Keeping my fingers crossed.
 
Very very similar to one of mine in terms of colour.

If it's any help: I lapped mine a bit higher - to 1000 grit. I use it with water. Sometimes I raise a slurry on it. It's my favourite CF and follows beautifully on from Welsh slates, producing the sweetest edge.

I hope yours hones well. Keeping my fingers crossed.
Took for a test drive dressed at 600 and felt like it was missing something. Took it up to 1200 and that was the sweet spot. I got a polished, reflective surface off the plate. My LED lights bounce off the top nicely. The color is also more green than blue-green. Using water and one of my usual test blades, I got a impressively comfortable shave. Has a light velvet feedback, almost nonexistent. It is a slow stone. Used some pressure to start and feathered to only the weight of blade to finish. Going to try some glycerin and light oil to see what else I can squeeze out of the rock. There’s more there, just need to find it. After just one use, I declare this is a worthy keeper. Hope the Arks don’t get jealous

94192618-88F6-48F7-A2EE-8838404F54A0.jpeg
 
Charnley edges I feel are some of the best on a good hard stone. Water will get the job done, but adding glycerin makes it easier to control that water on the stone and may add a little boost. I also like the way it makes the viscosity of the water feel gives better feed back.

Also find it works best done up to at least the 1200 Atoma, but I like to either go higher grit with paper or rub with botan and other rocks before steel. If you want it to cut faster you can slurry it and then go to just water for finish. I also have used other slurries on them and they seem to work nicely. Thuri or Tam O Shanter slurry is nice.

That stone has a really nice look to it Tim. These stones are usually a 150-200 laps for that final edge for me.
 
I've been getting to know this Charnley for a couple of weeks now. Surprised by how slow the stone is and also how fine. All preconceived notions out the window.
It had a crowned sharpening face that took some time to lap with wet dry paper. I learned that the lapping went much faster with full body weight on the stone.





 
I've been getting to know this Charnley for a couple of weeks now. Surprised by how slow the stone is and also how fine. All preconceived notions out the window.
It had a crowned sharpening face that took some time to lap with wet dry paper. I learned that the lapping went much faster with full body weight on the stone.





That looks much more like a Lynn Idwal to me - also a British novaculite - but could be one of the "earlier" khaki charns and it's just my monitor.
 
My knowledge is pretty limited with these stones, so it wouldn't surprise me at all if that wasn't a Charnley.

Do Lynn Idwal's have red in them also, and the breaks or damage areas look flinty?

The stone seems to not be able to create an edge on it's own. With some finishers I can lightly kill the edge on the stone and bring it back. This stone doesn't seem to be capable of that.
 
Top Bottom