What's new

Puma Rescale

Hi Lads
I have always wanted a Puma razor and today I acquired a beautiful Puma-Inox No63, blade only and no scales. I am a fairly decent woodworker with a full wood shop and have made scales before. I intend to rescale this razor using a figured wood that is close to the original Puma ivory color. I'm hoping to find a suitable pen blank. I intend to use 3 pins.
My question is, how are the scales shaped to clear the rubber sleeve that is on the tang? The rubber on my blade is in good condition so I intend to keep it. Are the scales cleared to avoid the rubber or are there extra thick washers at the pivot pin? If anyone could attach a photo of the area in question I would be eternally grateful.
 
how are the scales shaped to clear the rubber sleeve that is on the tang? The rubber on my blade is in good condition so I intend to keep it. Are the scales cleared to avoid the rubber or are there extra thick washers at the pivot pin? If anyone could attach a photo of the area in question I would be eternally grateful.”


The scales should have a wedge at the same bevel angle as the tang at the pivot. Same bevel angle, not same thickness), that when pinned tight will open the pivot end about one inch, way more than enough for the rubber on the tang. Any tube can be used as a third pin spacer, the tang should not touch the spacer when closed.

Scales should be thin enough to flex and keep the scales in tension when pinned. The wedge and pivot should look like a canoe (from top and bottom) when pinned at both ends. Use flexible wood and thin enough to flex repeatedly. This is what keeps a razor tight at the pivot.

In addition to how scales flex to remain in tension, thinner scales are more comfortable to hone and strop. Large, thick, clunky scales are uncomfortable and difficult to flip and strop.

There is a lot going on with scale construction, other than just handles for the razor, unlike a knife.

For an excellent photo tutorial on scale making, google (How I Make Traditional Horn Scales). Karle J is a master of razor restoration. He is making scales from Horn, which is an excellent scale material and perhaps easier to work than wood, they can be made very thin and take a high polish without a finish.

Bottom line, pro-tip, do all your design on paper, make templates and glue to the scale material, but do all your design on paper.
 
What a well written response, it all makes sense.
I used to be a tool designer so this will be well planned and finalized on paper before I make any dust. I have found a beautiful piece of tiger maple for the scales and I have an old lead wedge that I may use on this project. I have an unusable Puma (no rubber on the tang) in my collection that I can copy for the scale shape and thickness.
I think I will determine the size and location of the third pin after I have dry fitted everything together.
It's been a while since I did this kind of restoration and I'm looking forward to it so much. I will take my time and post a pic when it's done.
Your advise has removed a lot of guesswork.
Thanks. Gord.
 
I think this is what you're looking for.....

il_1588xN.4175494126_3afh.jpg



s-l1600.png
 
I didn't take those pix.
The scales meet the tang normally. The scales are shaped to accommodate the grip.
 
I finished the Puma and have been using it in my rotation for the last few weeks. In over 50 years of straight razor shaving this is one of the best razors that I have ever used. The tiger maple rescale was well worth the effort.
There is a wealth of knowledge available on this forum and I'm so grateful for the advise from its members.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_4286.JPG
    IMG_4286.JPG
    1.1 MB · Views: 16
  • IMG_4287.JPG
    IMG_4287.JPG
    995.8 KB · Views: 16
Top Bottom