What's new

First DSLR suggestion

Gents,

I'm heading to Japan later this week to visit the in-laws. While I'm there, I plan to go to the electronic district in Tokyo and pick up a new camera. After much negotiation, I've convinced the wife to let me get what I want (a DSLR) rather than a P&S like she prefers. This will be my first DSLR. I'm trying to decide whether I should go with an entry level camera, like the newly released D3200, or a more advanced camera that I can grow into, like a D7000, and would love your advice.

I'm also thinking that I will probably pick up a general use lens to go with the zoom that will likely come with the camera. I've been eyeing this one http://shop.nikonusa.com/store/nikonusa/en_US/pd/productID.213467400 as a possible option. Again, any thoughts/advice would be greatly appreciated.

My most likely use for the camera will be general photography (SOTD shots, vacation pictures, the puppies and wife in candid shots, etc.). And I'm hoping that I'll learn enough to make this a new hobby (because SWMBO doesn't approve of my prior hobbies of scuba diving and flying airplanes)...
 
The best advice that I can give you Bill, is to check local pricing before you head off. A lot of Japanese products can be found at lower prices in other parts of the world (ie. not everything in Akihabra is a bargain). In the case of the cameras, it is best to get your hands on each of them and see which model feels the best and is the most intuitive to use.
The old wisdom in camera shopping is: The camera which takes the best photos is the one which you have with you. If you find that something is too large or too heavy to cart with you all day, it will end up staying at home serving no purpose.
Good luck and have fun in Tokyo.
 
I've had the D3100 for about a year and love it. It can do everything I want. I have the standard lens and a 300-500mm zoom. Works great!
 
I started looking at the online prices for places like Yodobashi. The pricing on the D3200 is about 150% what it is here in the US...
 
In the old days cameras used to be expensive in Japan because they used to export them, and then import them back to sell in their stores. Go figure. I'm not sure if that is the case.

Stick with Nikon or Canon. Maybe Sony. Get the entry level body (Even the entry level cameras have great res and more features than you can poke a stick at) and spend extra to get the next level of lens above the standard kit lenses. A good lens will not get outdated, and hold it's value way longer than a good digital camera. If you get a good lens now, and you get the photo bug and want to upgrade your camera later, you will only need to upgrade the body.
 
In the old days cameras used to be expensive in Japan because they used to export them, and then import them back to sell in their stores. Go figure. I'm not sure if that is the case.

Stick with Nikon or Canon. Maybe Sony. Get the entry level body (Even the entry level cameras have great res and more features than you can poke a stick at) and spend extra to get the next level of lens above the standard kit lenses. A good lens will not get outdated, and hold it's value way longer than a good digital camera. If you get a good lens now, and you get the photo bug and want to upgrade your camera later, you will only need to upgrade the body.

That's what my Dad did. He bought the Nikon D40 kit many years ago and purchased a 18-200 lens of high quality.
Now it's time to upgrade the body.
Even the entry level Nikon DSLR cameras have updated features that warrant an upgrade.

I trust the reviews on dpreview.com and have been using the site for many years to compare models.
 
The D3200 looks very nice. My main camera is a D300s which I love, and my secondary camera is a D3100. I usually have the Nikon 35 mm prime on the D3100 and it's great. However, I might sell the D3100 and get D3200 mainly because of the improved screen and improved ISO performance.
 
Top Bottom