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INFO! Badger and Blade 2020 LE Pipe : Askwith Pipes

I am a bit jealous that I couldn't participate and I wish to all happy smoking on this beautiful release.

My proposal would be that for next time to consider having a pipe under 100 usd. I am sure we could find a solution on this thing.
 
I am a bit jealous that I couldn't participate and I wish to all happy smoking on this beautiful release.

My proposal would be that for next time to consider having a pipe under 100 usd. I am sure we could find a solution on this thing.
Hand made artisan pipes are probably not realistic under $100. You're paying for materials, the artist's time as well as their design...maybe an artisan cob at that price point.

I honestly feel like we're getting a steal of a deal from Chris on this pipe. So thankful to be getting one of these, much appreciated Chris! Well done @Kentos again on working out the details.
 

Kentos

Wiped out at 25
Moderator Emeritus
I am a bit jealous that I couldn't participate and I wish to all happy smoking on this beautiful release.

My proposal would be that for next time to consider having a pipe under 100 usd. I am sure we could find a solution on this thing.
I totally understand the sentiment. Maybe a group buy or something might be possible, but just by the nature of a custom made limited numbered pipe, prices will always be north of a 100.00. Cost is always a consideration of course, but value is important as well.

There will be another next year, maybe start saving now for that?
 

oc_in_fw

Contributor
I totally understand the sentiment. Maybe a group buy or something might be possible, but just by the nature of a custom made limited numbered pipe, prices will always be north of a 100.00. Cost is always a consideration of course, but value is important as well.

There will be another next year, maybe start saving now for that?
I would like to see an olive wood pipe one year- change it up a bit. Olive is a beautiful wood. Just thought I’d toss that out for consideration.
 

nortac

"Can't Raise an Eyebrow"
Contributor
I would like to see an olive wood pipe one year- change it up a bit. Olive is a beautiful wood. Just thought I’d toss that out for consideration.
And while last year's LE was a fantastic pipe and I have no doubt this year's will be to, I would like see something that is not stubby and in more classic proportions. Perhaps an olive wood Zulu?
 
And while last year's LE was a fantastic pipe and I have no doubt this year's will be to, I would like see something that is not stubby and in more classic proportions. Perhaps an olive wood Zulu?
I second a Zulu. That would be cool! Or churchwarden
 
Aesthetic for the most part, also in this case it allowed the design to have a chubby shank while making it possible to work in efficiencies that ultimately kept the price low. If the stem had been your standard flush fit the pipe would have been more expensive.

As to weakness, the stem should not be any weaker than normal, the narrowest part of the stem is still 12mm so plenty of material there.
 
Aesthetic for the most part, also in this case it allowed the design to have a chubby shank while making it possible to work in efficiencies that ultimately kept the price low. If the stem had been your standard flush fit the pipe would have been more expensive.

As to weakness, the stem should not be any weaker than normal, the narrowest part of the stem is still 12mm so plenty of material there.
I had thought that it would be considered. Cool to go back and look at the pictures with your explanation. Thanks!

I’m REALLY looking forward to this pipe. :)
 
You're welcome. One of the design specs for the pipe was to make it as accessible as possible to the members while still retaining a completely handmade pipe.

This is why there is an aluminium cap instead of silver (though that wasn't just a cost saving exercise, aluminium has many advantages over silver). The stem formed a major part of this efficiency saving, as you might know a stem is at least 50% of the difficult work in a pipe. A flush fit stem means each stem is unique to each bowl. Not only does that add an extra level of fit and fit finish to take care of (and the logistics of keeping them together) but it also means that I have to do at least some of the work on the stems and bowls at the same time, this is inefficient.

By using this stem design, the bowl and stem are entirely separate parts, this means if a bowl were to have a flaw that only showed at a later stage of the making, it is not a problem because I can just make another bowl. Same goes if I mess up a stem. I am able to make spare bowls as backups should I have any issues and I was also able to offer extra stems. A straight pipe was another area that kept things easier and faster, a bent pipe would have been a lot slower to make and more difficult to "standardise".

These efficiencies are ultimately passed on to you guys in the form of the nice discount you got, but you still get a fully handmade pipe that is not lacking anything from one of my standard production run. Oh and it also means in the unfortunate event that someone has a problem with their stem or their bowl I can hopefully just ship out a replacement part or at the very least my repair is much more straight forward.
 

oc_in_fw

Contributor
You're welcome. One of the design specs for the pipe was to make it as accessible as possible to the members while still retaining a completely handmade pipe.

This is why there is an aluminium cap instead of silver (though that wasn't just a cost saving exercise, aluminium has many advantages over silver). The stem formed a major part of this efficiency saving, as you might know a stem is at least 50% of the difficult work in a pipe. A flush fit stem means each stem is unique to each bowl. Not only does that add an extra level of fit and fit finish to take care of (and the logistics of keeping them together) but it also means that I have to do at least some of the work on the stems and bowls at the same time, this is inefficient.

By using this stem design, the bowl and stem are entirely separate parts, this means if a bowl were to have a flaw that only showed at a later stage of the making, it is not a problem because I can just make another bowl. Same goes if I mess up a stem. I am able to make spare bowls as backups should I have any issues and I was also able to offer extra stems. A straight pipe was another area that kept things easier and faster, a bent pipe would have been a lot slower to make and more difficult to "standardise".

These efficiencies are ultimately passed on to you guys in the form of the nice discount you got, but you still get a fully handmade pipe that is not lacking anything from one of my standard production run. Oh and it also means in the unfortunate event that someone has a problem with their stem or their bowl I can hopefully just ship out a replacement part or at the very least my repair is much more straight forward.
I don’t normally care for straight pipes, but the aluminum to stem transition is what pulled me in.
 
I should add that the decision to go with the stepped stem was a aesthetic choice on my part, and the cost savings is a happy bonus.
Yes I should add that Kent had excellent ideas about what he wanted in the pipe when we first spoke. His idea of the stepped stem and metal cap (design nods to Peterson) was fortuitous for me as it allowed me to design a pipe that could offer savings and colour options without compromising quality.
 
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