What's new
  • Welcome back Guest!
    If you have been away from our site you may have to request a new password. Simply click on the link for "lost" password in the log in page.
    Thank you.
  • Guest
    The BST is now open, please note the changes in our guidelines to address the recent fraudulent activity. Ensure you read the guidelines prior to creating a sale thread in the Buy-Sell-Trade forum with special attention to the new photo and payment requirements.
    Thank you for your patience and understanding.

Aftershave and age

It's here! It doesn't seem to bite when provoked.......
Well, what do I think about Veg?

I couldn't help but think of the movie high plains drifter where Clint Eastwood goes in for a straight razor shave and the barber tries to sell him an eau de lilac for 10 cents more. I almost wanted to strap on my .45 revolver after shaving in case 3 ruffians showed up

The Veg brings to mind the 140 years of people who have worn it, maybe a Victorian man after a straight shave to some bozo like me in his bathroom with a love of history and all things vintage.

The veg is not a hip new scent, but I also don't think it survived for 140 years for nothing.
 

luvmysuper

Moderator Emeritus
Contributor
Well, what do I think about Veg?

I couldn't help but think of the movie high plains drifter where Clint Eastwood goes in for a straight razor shave and the barber tries to sell him an eau de lilac for 10 cents more. I almost wanted to strap on my .45 revolver after shaving in case 3 ruffians showed up

The Veg brings to mind the 140 years of people who have worn it, maybe a Victorian man after a straight shave to some bozo like me in his bathroom with a love of history and all things vintage.

The veg is not a hip new scent, but I also don't think it survived for 140 years for nothing.
It either repulses you or it grows on you (like a fungus). :lol:
I think it's an unusual but fantastic scent.
 

BigJ

Ambassador
While at the grocery store this weekend I went down an isle that had some shaving stuff and there was a bottle of Aqua velva aftershave. For $3 I decided to give it a shot. Besides Williams shave soap and classic old spice and aqua velva, everything else was canned foam and cartridge razors, which I think is a real shame.

I enjoyed the scent, and my wife did too but said I smelled like my grandpa.

I'm in my late 20's but have quite a few aftershaves some people deem "Old man scents" such as clubman, aqua velva, original old spice, etc. While I know they aren't hip or trendy I enjoy the nod to the past and the historical aspect even if the scents aren't 100% exact that they used to be. As long as I enjoy the scent, that is what is important to me, as well as the performance.

Curious if people out there avoid these classics because of their age or for fear of smelling like an old man or their grandpa?
Some products are ‘classics’ because they are great!! Enjoy!! :a29: :a29:

(Long ago, I decided that I only need to please two people: LOTH (most important) and myself!)
 

luvmysuper

Moderator Emeritus
Contributor
I'm going to start a whole fragrance line called Old Man Spice.
Individual aftershaves will be named

"Ha! Kids today!"
"Back in my day..."
"Just resting my eyes"
"I have exact change"
"You'll put someone's eye out!"
"Want a Butterscotch?"
"Get off my lawn"
"You'll catch your death of cold"
"Don't break your neck!"
"That's music?"
 
It is an unusual scent. I can see where the litter box and funeral home people come from, but that's only if you let your mind take you there.
HA!!! I damn near spit my coffee out! That's great.


I'm not an aftershave/cologne person (it somehow makes me feel conspicuous, besides we've all experienced
THAT person who wears too much) but the two times I tried it some 30 years ago I tapped into a dusty old bottle of English leather my dad had on his bureau. The closest I come these days is Old Spice Fresh stick deodorant, which only tends to be noticeable if I put a lot on.

Dad liked to use Hai Karate, probably only because us kids thought it was a funny/stupid name. I really don't remember what else was on his bureau, maybe a bottle of Brut and possibly Aqua Velva.
 
Last edited:

BigJ

Ambassador
I'm going to start a whole fragrance line called Old Man Spice.
Individual aftershaves will be named

"Ha! Kids today!"
"Back in my day..."
"Just resting my eyes"
"I have exact change"
"You'll put someone's eye out!"
"Want a Butterscotch?"
"Get off my lawn"
"You'll catch your death of cold"
"Don't break your neck!"
"That's music?"
Where can I get ‘Get off my lawn?’

Next question, Does it work for the neighbor‘s dog??

:letterk1: :letterk1: :letterk1: :letterk1:
 
I'm going to start a whole fragrance line called Old Man Spice.
Individual aftershaves will be named

"Ha! Kids today!"
"Back in my day..."
"Just resting my eyes"
"I have exact change"
"You'll put someone's eye out!"
"Want a Butterscotch?"
"Get off my lawn"
"You'll catch your death of cold"
"Don't break your neck!"
"That's music?"
I would assume that “You’ll put someone’s eye out” and “You’ll catch your death of cold” will smell like grandma’s purse because the names sure sound like grandma
 
The old men I have known well were my grandfather, who used Bay Rum, my father, who used 4711, my father in law,who used Aramis. Since I started shaving in the mid 1960s I have bounced around. If memory serves there were Afta, Old Spice, Nine Flags, St. John's Lime, St. John's Bay Rum, English Leather, Jade East, Yardley Lavender, Yardley Black Label, Acqua di Selva, original Polo, Penhaligon English Ivy, Eau Sauvage, Dunhill, YSL, Chanel Pour Monsieur, Chanel Antaeus, Guerlain Habit Rouge, Guerlain Imperiale, Guerlain Vetiver, Tuscany, Mennen Skin Bracer, and 4711. It has been mainly 4711 for years, but now and then I circle back to Habit Rouge, Vetiver, Eau Sauvage, and Acqua di Selva. Today was 4711, but tomorrow St. John's Lime arrives. I figured changing it up helped trick people into thinking I was not an old man, but somehow that isn't working. I have liked them all, but the favorites were Eau Sauvage and Vetiver. The least favorite was a tie between Dunhill and Tuscany. I keep going back to 4711 because it is cheap, it is refreshing, and it does not linger, a major consideration in this modern world where people do not like to be assaulted by scents they claim trigger headaches.
 
The old men I have known well were my grandfather, who used Bay Rum, my father, who used 4711, my father in law,who used Aramis. Since I started shaving in the mid 1960s I have bounced around. If memory serves there were Afta, Old Spice, Nine Flags, St. John's Lime, St. John's Bay Rum, English Leather, Jade East, Yardley Lavender, Yardley Black Label, Acqua di Selva, original Polo, Penhaligon English Ivy, Eau Sauvage, Dunhill, YSL, Chanel Pour Monsieur, Chanel Antaeus, Guerlain Habit Rouge, Guerlain Imperiale, Guerlain Vetiver, Tuscany, Mennen Skin Bracer, and 4711. It has been mainly 4711 for years, but now and then I circle back to Habit Rouge, Vetiver, Eau Sauvage, and Acqua di Selva. Today was 4711, but tomorrow St. John's Lime arrives. I figured changing it up helped trick people into thinking I was not an old man, but somehow that isn't working. I have liked them all, but the favorites were Eau Sauvage and Vetiver. The least favorite was a tie between Dunhill and Tuscany. I keep going back to 4711 because it is cheap, it is refreshing, and it does not linger, a major consideration in this modern world where people do not like to be assaulted by scents they claim trigger headaches.
See, I don't think you should try to trick people into thinking your not an old man. I don't think old man should be a bad title, and I for one think it's not.

Old men are amazing people. I think the term should not be old men but experienced men.

As a man in my late twenties, I can confirm that old men have the best stories, and vast array of useful knowledge, and skills that have been somewhat lost and forgotten to time.

I have a pen pal, well email pal, of a man I met through a different forum for woodworking who is three times my age, and I am trying to learn as much about the craft from him as I possibly can while I still can. He has answers to questions most people my age would never ask, such as how do I use a hand plane to true this board or how do I trim this shoulder to make this tenon fit?

He comes from a time when power tools were still relatively new and people still had the skills and knowledge to work without them. He has the answers to these skills that have been considered outdated or obsolete with modern power tools and press board furniture. Heirloom furniture is built with pride, patience, and skill.

So no, being an old man is not a bad thing. It should be a badge of honor. If my greatest achievement in life is growing old and being able to that old man that my future children and grandchildren or even complete strangers ask for advice or wisdom, that will be a life well lived in my book.

And that's part of what makes this forum so great too. To be honest wet shaving is kind of a difficult topic to bring up in conversation, let alone with people my age. But the folks here are knowledgeable and willing to share wisdom that may be hard for a lad my age to get from my peers.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ctr
See, I don't think you should try to trick people into thinking your not an old man. I don't think old man should be a bad title, and I for one think it's not.

Old men are amazing people. I think the term should not be old men but experienced men.

As a man in my late twenties, I can confirm that old men have the best stories, and vast array of useful knowledge, and skills that have been somewhat lost and forgotten to time.

I have a pen pal, well email pal, of a man I met through a different forum for woodworking who is three times my age, and I am trying to learn as much about the craft from him as I possibly can while I still can. He has answers to questions most people my age would never ask, such as how do I use a hand plane to true this board or how do I trim this shoulder to make this tenon fit?

He comes from a time when power tools were still relatively new and people still had the skills and knowledge to work without them. He has the answers to these skills that have been considered outdated or obsolete with modern power tools and press board furniture. Heirloom furniture is built with pride, patience, and skill.

So no, being an old man is not a bad thing. It should be a badge of honor. If my greatest achievement in life is growing old and being able to that old man that my future children and grandchildren or even complete strangers ask for advice or wisdom, that will be a life well lived in my book.

And that's part of what makes this forum so great too. To be honest wet shaving is kind of a difficult topic to bring up in conversation, let alone with people my age. But the folks here are knowledgeable and willing to share wisdom that may be hard for a lad my age to get from my peers.
"The lyf so short. The craft so long to lerne." Chaucer
 
Top Bottom