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Slants - Looking for some basic info. Will they Krueger me? Why get one?

I'm not looking for recommendations (at least not yet), I just need a bit of info of why they exist.

When I first saw them, and since they seemed like something the more aggressive crowd liked, I figured I'd get filleted if I tried to use one, and didn't really bother looking into it more. However, while not needing another razor, at all, I came across one I aesthetically like, and it was a 'double' slant, which I hadn't heard of before, so, what's up with that?

Actual questions:
- Are slants really only for someone that wants an aggressive shave, has lots of tough hair, etc? I usually in the medium range for what I like in a razor. My open comb Parker C26 is a tad too aggressive am going to try and adjustable. If a slant, let alone a double slant, is on the agressive side, it wouldn't do (would a mild/medium slant even exist?).

- Do they take a lot of time to adjust too? If one isn't super careful, are you always a moment away from pulling a Sweeney Todd? I'm not always heedless, but I like a shave where I don't have to pay rapt attention to what I'm doing at all times.

- Is a double slant just that it has a slant on each side, or is there more to it than that (ie does it shave differently from a slant at all?). Why in the world would someone want one?

I really don't need another razor, and aesthetics are really no good reason to change that, and I'm pretty sure a slant is more aggressive then I need, but... well, logic doesn't really apply in the Badger & Blade dimension.

Remember don't bother doing recommendations, if I really do think I might go through with it, I'll just be giving the one I saw a try.
 
They come, like all DEs, in a range from mild to aggressive. You don't require any special technique to use them, but like any new razor there is a short period of adjustment.

For me, the benefit is that for similar levels of mildness or aggression, you get an efficiency bump.
 
It's hard to generalize. There are some very aggressive as well as very mild slants out there. Despite the looks, the main goal of most slants is smooth & comfortable shaving. For most slants, you don't need any special technique. They are good for someone with a heavy beard and/or who is shaving infrequently.

The Fasan type (double slant) are generally more aggressive. They need a somewhat different technique and more careful attention.

 
Slants work on the same principle as a French Guillotine. Rather than chopping whiskers off a slant will slice them off. The belief is that this is a more efficient and comfortable method of removing hair, or heads. No special technique is required to use them. Opinion varies as to their effectiveness.
 
As above. The iKon B1 slant, or the Merkur 37C would be my suggestion for "medium" range. I find the iKon 102 to be mild to the point of uselessness. I have not tried their X3, but have seen it on their Blems page for $25, which is hard to beat for a starter. I rate the B1S right below the Wunderbar, being a bit less toothy, and very, very close in efficiency.
 
It's hard to generalize. There are some very aggressive as well as very mild slants out there. Despite the looks, the main goal of most slants is smooth & comfortable shaving. For most slants, you don't need any special technique. They are good for someone with a heavy beard and/or who is shaving infrequently.

The Fasan type (double slant) are generally more aggressive. They need a somewhat different technique and more careful attention.

Fasan and other lightweight slants require a very gentle touch. Almost like a subtle dance between the razor and your skin. You have to use a very, very light touch. Almost no pressure. I love it.
 
I'm not looking for recommendations (at least not yet), I just need a bit of info of why they exist.

You need the Parker slant ;-)

When I first saw them, and since they seemed like something the more aggressive crowd liked, I figured I'd get filleted if I tried to use one, and didn't really bother looking into it more. However, while not needing another razor, at all, I came across one I aesthetically like, and it was a 'double' slant, which I hadn't heard of before, so, what's up with that?

Never heard of a double slant.
Could you share a picture?

Actual questions:
- Are slants really only for someone that wants an aggressive shave, has lots of tough hair, etc? I usually in the medium range for what I like in a razor. My open comb Parker C26 is a tad too aggressive am going to try and adjustable. If a slant, let alone a double slant, is on the agressive side, it wouldn't do (would a mild/medium slant even exist?).

So the story goes.
But I find my slant - yes, The Parker in Rose Gold - very mild yet effective.

It is, however, marketed as a semi-slant, so that might explain.

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- Do they take a lot of time to adjust too? If one isn't super careful, are you always a moment away from pulling a Sweeney Todd? I'm not always heedless, but I like a shave where I don't have to pay rapt attention to what I'm doing at all times.

Not at all.
The Parker at least is remarkably easy to use, with no learning curve at all.

- Is a double slant just that it has a slant on each side, or is there more to it than that (ie does it shave differently from a slant at all?). Why in the world would someone want one?

I don't know.
Iirc, the 1930's FASAN which is one of the original slants nas been described as a double slant.


I really don't need another razor, and aesthetics are really no good reason to change that, and I'm pretty sure a slant is more aggressive then I need, but... well, logic doesn't really apply in the Badger & Blade dimension.

Truer words have seldom been spoken.

Remember don't bother doing recommendations, if I really do think I might go through with it, I'll just be giving the one I saw a try.

Did I mention the Parker already? ;-)
 
I'm not looking for recommendations (at least not yet), I just need a bit of info of why they exist.
They exist because in the endless pursuit for a perfect razor by manufactures, the slant razors that torque or slightly twist the blade seem to work differently than a regular razor.
The first BBS shave I got is from a slant (Razorock German 37 slant) with a GSB blade, they tend to be more efficient and all you need is a 2 pass shave with some touch ups compared to a 3 pass mid range with pickups. 3 passes with a slant might over shave and feel irritable to some so I found 2 passes with pickups works for me.
The Razorock Wunderbar slant is a razor that has gone through marketed proto types to reach it's very well machined level of torqueing the blade.
Wunderbar with a light touch can return excellent shaves with a steep angle approach because of the curved head design.
Razorock at the moment is developing another slant razor from rumors floating around(might have interchangeable heads for different results).
Rex supply Co, Konsul stainless steel adjustable slant razor is the latest greatest in on the fly adjustable, indications from owner reviews it is very smooth shave.
The interesting thing about DE & SE razors I can get a BBS in 2 passes with pickups that are not slants, seasoned technique is still king.
 
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Ahhh...well. I prefer not to use the guillotine comparison since it seems rather...shall we say...terminal. :)

I prefer to liken a slant to a well-peened scythe. Same stroke, same result. But whatever spins your toque...

Actual questions:
- Are slants really only for someone that wants an aggressive shave, has lots of tough hair, etc?

No. They're for anyone. As noted already, they're just another DE but they offer a shave experience that many prefer. Like me! I have mild to wild, and prefer the "mid-mild" side.

- Do they take a lot of time to adjust too?

Two shaves, for me. But then I switch between razors about every two weeks.


If one isn't super careful, are you always a moment away from pulling a Sweeney Todd? I'm not always heedless, but I like a shave where I don't have to pay rapt attention to what I'm doing at all times.

Several of my slants are comfortable that way. Only one -- the RazoRock Wunderbar -- is prone to biting more than the others. A great excuse to practice mindfulness. My ATT S2, Rex Konsul, RR German 37, and others are all just like any DE razor only smoother.

- Is a double slant just that it has a slant on each side, or is there more to it than that (ie does it shave differently from a slant at all?). Why in the world would someone want one?

YES! Somebody got it right! There are three kinds of slants in current use: DE tilted, SE tilted and DE helical. Briefly: a "tilted" slant or what was in earlier years called a "single" slant is a razor that looks like a DE with the head on at an angle. If you look at it from the shaving sides, the two edges both slant in the same direction; either left or right depending on how you're holding the razor.

The Above the Tie X1 is a single edge razor using Artist Club blades. With only one edge, and a very narrow blade, it is by definition another type of tilted slant. The difference is that since it's single edge you can't turn the razor around to have the edge slant "the other way."

Helical slants, which used to be called "double" slants are those that get their "slantiness" from twisting the blade instead of tilting the head. Look at a helical slant edge-on and you'll see one edge slanting one way and the edge on the other side of the razor going the other way, like a wide "X" shape.

Making a whippy thin little piece of stainless firm enough to shave you takes tension. This is achieved in "plain" DE razors by bending the blade inside the head, and by clamping the edges firmly. Helical slant razors add even more tension to the blade with the twist in addition to bending the blade. Tilted slants, on the other hand are just that: a "plain" DE head mounted at an angle. The tension in a tilted slant is only from the bending of the blade, as there is no twist.

They are different types of razors and can shave a little differently. With an SE (single edge) tilted slant you have one and only one edge to play with, so you have fewer options for how you use the razor.

With a DE tilted slant you get an interesting option. Some guys don't like helicals because they say "the edge slants one way on one side of my face and the other way on the other side." True enough, but in my mind that's not a terribly significant thing. With a DE tilted slant you can have the blade slanting the same way on each side of your face. Just spin the razor around.

I prefer helical slants because of the additional blade tensioning from the twist. That said, however, there are some good tilted DE slants like the iKon Shavecraft 102 that is still findable.

Remember don't bother doing recommendations, if I really do think I might go through with it, I'll just be giving the one I saw a try.

It's easy to find mild slants. I'm going to "bother" doing a recommendation because I think it's necessary context. The Parker SemiSlant is a good place to start. Quite mild. I had one and liked it OK but it wasn't too flashy. I like quirky. My son has it now and loves it. It was his second razor, so I think a good place to start.

After that, branch out as you wish. For detailed user reviews of a variety of slant razors, search for "The Tilted Picnic" here on B&B. I've been reviewing slants for the last three years here (and in the middle of a series on the X1 at the moment). Others have as well, and there's a great couple of threads going right now on the Rex Konsul adjustable slant.

And keep asking questions!

O.H.
 
Slants are great.
Most razors I use are slants.
The vintage slants, especially plastic and bakelite, are my top razors.
Some doubt slants shave better. My experience says the do.
Okay, I am at looking at one that is ABS plastic, 16oz, and 3.25 inches. I like med/long handles, and a bit more weight, but does that have me give up yet? no. I'm pretty sure I'm just using the excuse that I've not had a slant to justify another razor, and I honestly was only interested because it looked cool. In a very nerdy kind of way. I did have a Merkur Bakelite, which would have been okay if it had had a solid handle, hollow it just made the whole thing way to light and off balance. I think this has hollow as well, but if I do get it, I can likely find a way to fill in the handle. Are the bakelite and plastic ones you've had seem mild/med/agressive, or they all varied? I'd only be using it on legs, I think it would be a bit more tricky for underarms and chin. Except for the height of shorts/swimsuit season, I'm not always right on top of leg shaving, so it can get a bit long sometimes, so that was another thought for getting it.
 
It's hard to generalize. There are some very aggressive as well as very mild slants out there. Despite the looks, the main goal of most slants is smooth & comfortable shaving. For most slants, you don't need any special technique. They are good for someone with a heavy beard and/or who is shaving infrequently.

The Fasan type (double slant) are generally more aggressive. They need a somewhat different technique and more careful attention.

The one I'm looking at is ABS plastic, and isn't vintage, but I think maybe they had the Fasan razors in mind when they did theirs.
 
Those plastic slants, like the PAA Fakelite that I have, are a fun way to get to know slant shaving, but they have their drawbacks; the lightness means that, for my old lined face, they tend to skip unless you use more pressure (which I have no desire to do). A stainless steel handle fixes that.
 
Ahhh...well. I prefer not to use the guillotine comparison since it seems rather...shall we say...terminal. :)

I prefer to liken a slant to a well-peened scythe. Same stroke, same result. But whatever spins your toque...



No. They're for anyone. As noted already, they're just another DE but they offer a shave experience that many prefer. Like me! I have mild to wild, and prefer the "mid-mild" side.



Two shaves, for me. But then I switch between razors about every two weeks.




Several of my slants are comfortable that way. Only one -- the RazoRock Wunderbar -- is prone to biting more than the others. A great excuse to practice mindfulness. My ATT S2, Rex Konsul, RR German 37, and others are all just like any DE razor only smoother.



YES! Somebody got it right! There are three kinds of slants in current use: DE tilted, SE tilted and DE helical. Briefly: a "tilted" slant or what was in earlier years called a "single" slant is a razor that looks like a DE with the head on at an angle. If you look at it from the shaving sides, the two edges both slant in the same direction; either left or right depending on how you're holding the razor.

The Above the Tie X1 is a single edge razor using Artist Club blades. With only one edge, and a very narrow blade, it is by definition another type of tilted slant. The difference is that since it's single edge you can't turn the razor around to have the edge slant "the other way."

Helical slants, which used to be called "double" slants are those that get their "slantiness" from twisting the blade instead of tilting the head. Look at a helical slant edge-on and you'll see one edge slanting one way and the edge on the other side of the razor going the other way, like a wide "X" shape.

Making a whippy thin little piece of stainless firm enough to shave you takes tension. This is achieved in "plain" DE razors by bending the blade inside the head, and by clamping the edges firmly. Helical slant razors add even more tension to the blade with the twist in addition to bending the blade. Tilted slants, on the other hand are just that: a "plain" DE head mounted at an angle. The tension in a tilted slant is only from the bending of the blade, as there is no twist.

They are different types of razors and can shave a little differently. With an SE (single edge) tilted slant you have one and only one edge to play with, so you have fewer options for how you use the razor.

With a DE tilted slant you get an interesting option. Some guys don't like helicals because they say "the edge slants one way on one side of my face and the other way on the other side." True enough, but in my mind that's not a terribly significant thing. With a DE tilted slant you can have the blade slanting the same way on each side of your face. Just spin the razor around.

I prefer helical slants because of the additional blade tensioning from the twist. That said, however, there are some good tilted DE slants like the iKon Shavecraft 102 that is still findable.



It's easy to find mild slants. I'm going to "bother" doing a recommendation because I think it's necessary context. The Parker SemiSlant is a good place to start. Quite mild. I had one and liked it OK but it wasn't too flashy. I like quirky. My son has it now and loves it. It was his second razor, so I think a good place to start.

After that, branch out as you wish. For detailed user reviews of a variety of slant razors, search for "The Tilted Picnic" here on B&B. I've been reviewing slants for the last three years here (and in the middle of a series on the X1 at the moment). Others have as well, and there's a great couple of threads going right now on the Rex Konsul adjustable slant.

And keep asking questions!

O.H.
Thanks for all the information. I know there isn't really a way to know if it would be mild or not, unless someone reviewed it. But its good to have an idea. I'm not sure if I'm trying to talk myself out of getting it, or in to getting it, but getting some general information/advice does help. It's good to know that double slant/slant doesn't automatically mean aggressive. Also, that there isn't a long learning curve, and that no, it can't jump out of my hand and kill me. (the look of them has always made me feel that I could harm myself trying to use it).

The only reason I said not to recommend, is that a) I was more interested in learning some general stuff about slants/double slants, and b) I wasn't necessarily in the market, so much as I fell in love with this razor, which is a slant, and not having a slant is the only 'hanging by a thread' *reasonable* excuse I could possibly have for buying it. If everyone said, oh yeah, slants are all on the aggressive side, then that would be it, a no go.

I think I have to take the plunge and post pics. It's part of a horror theme, so the first pic will be the group of them, and then a close up of the one I'm thinking of.
 
Never heard of a double slant.
Could you share a picture?
I'm totally self-conscious about this, because I only was interested in the razor because of what it looked like, and as a sort of side note to talk myself into it, that I never had a slant. This is soooo nerdy. However, others have asked for pics, and there is enough interest, and in looking around I stumbled on a description that said it was inspired by the FASAN, so ... *sigh*... I'll post.
 
Remember don't bother doing recommendations, if I really do think I might go through with it, I'll just be giving the one I saw a try.
Okay, here goes, I'm taking the plunge. Yes, this is me at my nerdy weirdest. I was looking at putting an order into Top of the Chain for soap and razors. I do NOT need another razors. And then I saw a green translucent razor. And it had sparkles. And it looked funny. And it is based on a horror monster. I was hooked. There is a whole line, and while the Filament was neat, I thought it would show dirt/waterspots/soap too much. Crimson Ghost was considered, but it seemed a bit dramatic to shave with a red razor. Then, a very close second, was El Fantasma, because it is glows in the dark! However, the winner is La Criatura because though Blue is my favourite colour, Phantom Blue looked boring.. and I like green, and IT HAS SPARKLES! Yes, I can be that juvenile. Also, to go all vintage, it reminds me of the plastics in the 60s that were used for water tumblers, that had gold flecks in them. In fact a lot of 50s/60s stuff had sparkles. So less unicorn, more nostalgia.
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