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red pork tamales, filling help.

Last year a kind member sent me some fine tamales from close to the border. It was a reminder of how much I miss these amazing things. I have the Masa and wrappers. My favorite filling is a red spiced pork. I have been searching for a filling recipe but am coming up empty handed. Does someone have a recipe or at least the real name of this filling.
 
Could this help?

INGREDIENTS

FOR THE BATTER

  • 5 ounces (2/3 cup) fresh pork lard, chilled
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 scant teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups coarsely ground (1 pound) fresh masa, or 1 3/4 cups masa harina mixed with 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons hot water, cooled to room temperature
  • 2/3 cup chicken, beef, or vegetable stock, preferably homemade

FOR THE WRAPPER

  • 4 ounces dried corn husks

FOR THE FILLING

  • 6 large dried New Mexico chiles, stems removed, seeded, and torn into 4 pieces
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 12 ounces lean boneless pork shoulder, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 1 teaspoon salt


DIRECTIONS

  • To make the batter: In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the lard, baking powder, and salt. Beat until light and fluffy. Add 1 cup masa and 1/3 cup stock; beat until thoroughly combined. Add the remaining masa and 1/3 cup stock; beat until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. The batter should be soft but it should hold its shape in a spoon.
  • If using fresh masa, test the batter to determine if it is adequately fluffy (this will ensure light and tender tamales): Drop 1 teaspoon batter into a cup of cold water. If it floats to the surface, it is ready.
  • Refrigerate at least 1 hour. Store batter in an airtight container, refrigerated, up to 2 days.
  • To make the wrappers: Reconstitute the corn husks by placing them in a deep saucepan and covering them with water. Set saucepan over high heat, and bring to a boil.
  • Transfer husks and water to a heatproof bowl. Set a small plate on top of husks, keeping them submerged. Soak 1 hour. Remove from water.
  • To make the filling: In the jar of a blender, combine chiles, garlic, pepper, and cumin. Add 1 1/2 cups water, and blend until a smooth puree forms.
  • Strain mixture into a medium saucepan. Add the pork, 1 3/4 cups water, and salt. Place over medium heat; cook, stirring frequently, until liquid has reduced to the consistency of a thick sauce and the meat is very tender, 50 to 60 minutes. Using a fork, break up the meat.
  • Return the tamale batter to the mixer. On low to medium speed, mix the batter for a few seconds to lighten the dough. Add 3 tablespoons sauce; mix again to combine.
  • You may need to add a few tablespoons or so of chicken stock. The batter should not be stiff, but slightly loose and not runny. Remember, the lighter the batter, the more tender the tamale.
  • To assemble the tamales: Unroll one large reconstituted corn husk; tear lengthwise along grain to make 1/4-inch-wide strips (two per tamale); if strips aren't long enough, tie two together.
  • Place another long piece, lightly dried, on work surface, pointed end away from you; scoop 1/4 cup batter onto middle of one end. Spread into a 4-inch square, leaving a 1 1/2-inch border on pointed end and a 1-inch border on the other sides. Spoon 2 tablespoons filling down the center. Bring long sides together to form a cylinder, making sure the batter encases filling. Fold the pointed end under; tie loosely with husk strip. Fold the flat end under; tie. Repeat.
  • Reserve smaller husks to line the steamer basket and cover the tamales.
  • To steam the tamales: Set steamer over high heat. When steam puffs out, reduce the heat to medium. Steam 1 hour 15 minutes, adding more water when necessary. To check for doneness, unwrap a tamale: If ready, dough will come free from wrapper and feel soft. If dough sticks to wrapper, rewrap, and steam 15 to 20 more minutes. Remove from heat; let stand 15 minutes for batter to firm up. They will remain warm for about 1 hour.
 
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I'm guessing I'm not going to find these at the local Walmart. Do you guys get these online or where?
 
Here you go John



6 ounces dried ancho chiles


4 cups boiling water

2 teaspoons dried Mexican oregano


3 garlic cloves, peeled


2 cups water or 2 cups chicken stock or 2 cups pork stock

2 tablespoons lard or 2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 [SUP]1[/SUP]⁄[SUB]2[/SUB] tablespoons flour

1 teaspoon salt

4 cups pork, shredded


heat a griddle or heavy skillet over medium-high heat until a drop of water sizzles on contact.


Meanwhile, remove stems and seeds from chiles while rinsing under cold running water.

Place them on the griddle and toast, 3 or 4 at a time, just until the aroma is released, 30 to 60 seconds. Be careful not to burn them.

Place the chiles in a bowl and cover with the boiling water. Let soak until softened, about 10 minutes.

Drain the chiles and discard the liquid.

Place chiles, oregano, 2 garlic cloves and the water or stock in blender and process to a smooth puree. Add more water or stock if it is too thick.

Work puree through a medium-mesh sieve into a bowl.

Discard any solids that remain.

Pour in a little more liquid to help rinse the sauce through the sieve.

In heavy, medium-size saucepan, heat lard or oil over medium-high heat until rippling.

Add remaining garlic and brown in the hot fat, pressing down with the back of a cooking spoon to release flavor.

Remove and discard garlic.

Add flour, stirring constantly until golden.

Add strained chile puree and salt to the pan and reduce the heat to low.

It will splatter, so be careful.

Cook over low heat, stirring often, until the raw taste is gone and the flavor of the chiles has mellowed, about 10 minutes.

Reserve 1/2 cup of chile to mix with masa dough.

Mix shredded pork into remaining mixture. Makes enough filling for 45 to 50 tamales.


Make sure to soak Husks Well

Take a large serving spoon and smear masa along the inside 2/3rd of Husk, add spanish olive (2) with seeds, or jalapenos.

place in steamer and pack them tight

steam for 45-60 mins.

cool a bit and Devour, or put them in the fridge to let ingredients merge and eat next day


If you need help findng the ingredients PM me the list and I will buy and ship

good Luck and plan an afternoon or full evening for prep
 
Tamale making is labor intensive. One short cut is to buy ground chili pepper instead of the dried chili pods. They are the same thing. So the decision is to pick the kind of chili powder you want. You should be able to find a variety of powders in your area.

If you can't find what your looking for let me know, I would be happy to send you one or both.
 
My mom and aunts would spend all day making tamales when I was a kid. My mom's family grew up around South St. Paul which has a large Mexican population. I have several uncles who are Mexican and the family get togethers were filled with amazing food.

So the decision is to pick the kind of chili powder you want.

This is were I get confused on chilies. I have generic chili powder from the grocery store, is this the same thing?
 
My mom and aunts would spend all day making tamales when I was a kid. My mom's family grew up around South St. Paul which has a large Mexican population. I have several uncles who are Mexican and the family get togethers were filled with amazing food.



This is were I get confused on chilies. I have generic chili powder from the grocery store, is this the same thing?

Pretty much a yes. The dried chili pods are ground up and put into a bottle. The pods are much fresher tough. Who knows how long the powder has been sitting in some warehouse. But for practical purposes it should be fine. If you are going to make tamales why not return to the market and get a new bottle or package.

I sent a few packages from these guys to another member. They only grind the pods on order....awesome.


$DriedGuajilloChiles_03.jpg
 
...This is were I get confused on chilies. I have generic chili powder from the grocery store, is this the same thing?

Pretty much a yes. The dried chili pods are ground up and put into a bottle....

Actually, being from the same area of the country as he is -- the "chili powder" he's likely to find at the supermarket is a powder mix for making chili -- with cumin, oregano, garlic and other spices -- not pure ground ancho, new mexico, pasillas, etc. Sometimes you can find the actual ground chilis, but you need to check the label.

These are not the same thing:
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That above on how to prepare the Masa is pretty good, however IMHO you do not want if Fluffy, you want it pasty, it will allow the moisture from the meat to absorb better and make the tamales moist, not dry, if you have ever had a dry grainy tamale you;; know why I say this. If you can find a Mexican Market, some sell the masa pre mixed, you just mix your ancho paste with it and some water mix well and your good to go. the key is to blend enough where it is smooth , pasty and creamy, so it will hold to the husk, My personal opinion it is worth grinding your own ancho chile rather than the power, agreed it is more labor intensive, but you can tweak it much better and no preservatives, or other chemicals that can be added in commercial spice makers. If you are going to take the plung, jump in the pool, don't just get your feet wet, But this is why most people only make the once or twice a year. We do it at the holidays and make a family party of it. Also there will be a subtle difference in flavor between the guajillo and the Ancho , the guajillo a bit more pungent and spicy hot, and the ancho with a darker sweeter tone. We use both. Great thread!
 
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Fresh masa isn't an option here so it is the instant stuff. The wife doesn't like much heat so I'm guessing the anchos are the way to go.

I also don't have a steamer so I used one of those spring flower looking things. The only problem is they only allow like 3/4 of an inch of water. This leads to constant filling.
 
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