Pour Over Coffee Brewer

Good day, I am looking to add a bit of variety to my coffee brewing/drinking. Before Christmas, I mostly purchased pre-ground coffee and made it in a small 4 cup Mr. Coffee auto-drip brewer. However, I was given a gift card to Wal-mart and purchased for myself a Kitchen Aid blade grinder. I've read burr grinders are better for consistency but that is not why I am here. I like to try my hand at doing pour over brewing and eventually purchase a French press. So, my question for the group is what is a good, economical pour over brewer that I could get to experiment with alternative brewing styles?

Thanks for your help.

R/
Dave
 
Maybe a little pricey for some, but I've used a (ceramic) Hario V60 for a number of years with god results. They also make a smaller size which is perfect for pouring one mug of coffee directly into your favorite mug.
 
Turtle has it right.

The Melitta's are inexpensive and the #4 filter is available wherever groceries are sold.

The single cup Joe takes a #2 filter and is no slouch although the coffee snobs will say otherwise.

When you use a dripper, you now have control over the brew process. Grind size, amount of coffee, water temperature and how the pour progresses.

The Melittas are a fast dripping devices compared to say a Bonmac or a Beehouse dripper.

Enjoy the brew.
 
Maybe a little pricey for some, but I've used a (ceramic) Hario V60 for a number of years with god results. They also make a smaller size which is perfect for pouring one mug of coffee directly into your favorite mug.
If you go the Hario V60 route, you should consider getting a gooseneck pouring kettle. This way you can easily control the pour. I will use the V60 when I want a 3 minute brewing time.
 
The only issue with Hario (or Chemex which is also a 60 degree funnel) is availability of the filters.

They are available through specialty cooking supply stores or online only.

You "can" use Chemex filters in Hario (and the other way around).

Chemex on left - Hario on right

 
Thank you everyone for your suggestions. Today I went to BB&B and found a pour over cone there. It was a little more than what I wanted to spend but it was available today which was what I wanted. It is a Primula pour over cone. I just made my first cup and it was a joy to drink.

R/
Dave
 
Thank you everyone for your suggestions. Today I went to BB&B and found a pour over cone there. It was a little more than what I wanted to spend but it was available today which was what I wanted. It is a Primula pour over cone. I just made my first cup and it was a joy to drink.

R/
Dave
Glad to hear you enjoyed it! What coffee did you use?
 
Enjoy! I've been making coffee with the pour over method for...well, a long time. Before I knew it was a "method," or had a name. I have filter holders from cup size to a cone that will fit a 12 cup carafe, but the Melita number 4 is my most used for large mugs and for my 4-cup carafe.
 
... I like to try my hand at doing pour over brewing and eventually purchase a French press. ...
Why not go directly to a French press?
Not much more expensive, no consumables except the coffee, almost as easy for cleanup, and you don't get coffee that tastes like paper.
 
Why not go directly to a French press?
Not much more expensive, no consumables except the coffee, almost as easy for cleanup, and you don't get coffee that tastes like paper.
+1 ... I've never found pour over to be much better tasting than auto drip.

French press, on the other hand, will open up the coffee and release much more flavor and texture.

Also consider an Aero Press. Very easy to use and clean up is a breeze.
 
Why not go directly to a French press?
Not much more expensive, no consumables except the coffee, almost as easy for cleanup, and you don't get coffee that tastes like paper.
Some people do not like the fines that remain from the coffee brewed in a French press. Also, the French press method tends to extract more of the bitter flavors in the coffee.
 
A French press will happen at some point. The one I'd like to get is something I'll have to save up for in a couple months. Besides, the pour over I got has a metal filter, in a way it filters similarly as a press. If I wanted to, I could take the metal filter out and use a paper one. To each their own. I found something that I play with for now.
 
On the weekends when I have time to slow down, I really enjoy my Clever dripper - it's practically fool-proof and requires very little effort. It also takes Melita cone filters that can be found at any big box / grocer. It's my favorite and cheapest coffee-related purchase to date (aside from my vintage Bunn Pour O'Matic from Craigslist.)
 

TexLaw

Contributor
Congratulations on finding a new method you enjoy! As you've discovered, the pour-over method is quite easy and inexpensive to get into, not to mention that it makes some great coffee.

When you decide to move toward the French press, I highly recommend getting one with a stainless carafe. They are more expensive, but you won't think that when you're replacing the glass one that just broke (after cleaning up the mess). A stainless one doesn't make any better coffee, really, but it will last through the end times.

Eventually, as you also seem to know, you'll want a burr grinder to improve your coffee. A great way to get into that is something like the Hario Slim hand grinder. It's not expensive, it does a great job, and it's entirely hand-held. For a French press grind, it takes me about a minute to grind the 30g of beans I dump into my press. There are better grinders, but not for the money. It's also fantastic for traveling.

Cheers!
 
Congratulations on finding a new method you enjoy! As you've discovered, the pour-over method is quite easy and inexpensive to get into, not to mention that it makes some great coffee.

When you decide to move toward the French press, I highly recommend getting one with a stainless carafe. They are more expensive, but you won't think that when you're replacing the glass one that just broke (after cleaning up the mess). A stainless one doesn't make any better coffee, really, but it will last through the end times.

Eventually, as you also seem to know, you'll want a burr grinder to improve your coffee. A great way to get into that is something like the Hario Slim hand grinder. It's not expensive, it does a great job, and it's entirely hand-held. For a French press grind, it takes me about a minute to grind the 30g of beans I dump into my press. There are better grinders, but not for the money. It's also fantastic for traveling.

Cheers!
Yeah, the stainless one is what I plan on getting next. That will be in time. I do want something I can use while traveling and/or camping, grinder and press combo. In the meantime, I am enjoying the Primula cone. This morning I added some shredded fresh mint with the coffee grinds to steep with the water. I must say, it was quite good, at least for me.

R/
Dave
 
The wife and I got a 44 oz. Frieling Stainless French Press from BB&B. It has a double wall construction that acts like a thermos and keeps the coffee hot for as long as it takes me to drink a full liter in the morning. It's more expensive than a glass one but I replaced three of those before I finally learned that glass always finds a way to break - especially with a klutz like me.
We have a melitta too and kind of switch off which method we are in the mood for.
 
On the weekends when I have time to slow down, I really enjoy my Clever dripper - it's practically fool-proof and requires very little effort. It also takes Melita cone filters that can be found at any big box / grocer. It's my favorite and cheapest coffee-related purchase to date (aside from my vintage Bunn Pour O'Matic from Craigslist.)
I love the Clever dripper as well. Always gives a great and rich cup of coffee, and the price is right.
 
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