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Hario Buono cordless kettle = pour-over coffee

I recently purchases a Hario Buono cordless electric kettle. This is the review of that product.


Specs:

Volume: 0.8 liters (3 cups)
Type: Cordless removable kettle with stationary powered base
Power: 1100 watts
Material: Satin stainless steel exterior, polished stainless interior
Shut off temp: 212 F degrees F
Street price: $65-$80

Test Altitude: 580 ft. Performance/results may vary at your altitude (time to boil, temp at shut off)


Good points:

Reasonably rapid heat up time. Kettle heats up from cold (65 degree) filtered tap water to shut off temperature (boiling) in just under 5 minutes.

The goose-neck spout allows for slow to medium speed flow. It is easy to keep the flow rate exact and to direct the pour where you want it to go.

I find that the kettle is very convenient as the base stays plugged in and stationary. The kettle comes off of the base to be used without dragging a cord around.


Bad Points

Kettle switching is on/off so when it turns off it starts to cool. There is no "retain temperature" function as there is with the Bonavita electric kettle which will retain a set temperature.

The size at 0.8 liter is a bit small for a 1 liter pot of coffee.

This is a specialized coffee pour over kettle. It would be awkward to use as a tea kettle because of the restricted slow flow, though if you are not put off by the slower delivery of hot water it would be suitable for any process requiring hot water (coffee, tea, coca, instant oatmeal, etc)

Ask questions about this product in this review thread.





 
What do you consider are the benefits of using an electric kettle over just a normal kettle over a stove top burner?
 
What do you consider are the benefits of using an electric kettle over just a normal kettle over a stove top burner?
I find the electric kettles I own heat faster than a stove top kettle. I should do a time comparison. Before you say "you have a wimpy stove". I have a commercial natural gas DCS range with cast iron burners. (23k btu burner output is the figure I recall)

If the electric kettle is cordless (has separate cord/heating base) then once the water is hot, it is the same as a stove top, un-encombered, kettle except the bottom of the kettle is not screaming hot like a stove top model would be. Both of my cordless kettles have bases that are mildly warm to the touch. My Russel Hobbs kettle is corded with a metal bottom and it is screaming hot like a stove top kettle would be but it has rubber feet so you do not need to worry about scorching, cracking, or burning your countertop. The other two cordless coffee pour over kettles I own have plastic base on the kettle.

If you already use a stove top, it would not be worth it to spend the money for a cordless electric.

If you do not own a kettle and are thinking about one, the cordless electrics run about twice the cost of the stove top model from the same manufacturer.

I should say that I was not looking for another cordless electric kettle. I just had this one fall into my lap for less than what I would have had to pay for a standard stove-top Hario Buono kettle. It was something I just could not refuse.

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So I'm looking for a kettle to add to my Christmas list. I am currently using a small frothing pitcher with hot water dispenser built in to a coffee maker. It works ok with my pour over cone but I'm sure it could be better. I'm hoping for a Kalita setup to go with the kettle too!

With that being said the stove is on the other side of the island so stove top is not convenient. I typically brew per cup but would be interested in being able to do larger batches. My wife also drinks tea and this would be used for that.

Have looked at the bonavita, hario, and many other off brands on Amazon. I'm not sure if the variable temp is worth the price and which one ends up being the best all purpose. Hoping for some insight or at least a recommendation.

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 
Have looked at the bonavita, hario, and many other off brands on Amazon. I'm not sure if the variable temp is worth the price and which one ends up being the best all purpose. Hoping for some insight or at least a recommendation.
I have both

The temp hold feature is convenient. set and lock the temp and the water will be at perfect brew temp when YOU are ready. Set. Walk away and do other things (grind, get cups, milk, etc). When you are ready to brew, water is still perfect temp. Pick up the kettle and pour.

Other than that, there's no difference

 
How does the Hario compare against the Bonavita when pouring slowly? Does the Hario allow one to pour at a lower flow rate, down to a drip or dribble without water dripping back down the spout? In the pictures posted the spouts look roughly similar in shape but the Hario opening looks to have sharper angle (not as horizontal) to better support the occasional need to pour slowwwwwly.
 
I do not find any perceivable/functional difference between the pour volume control from either kettle.

Both pour slow enough to allow you to have a continuous flow into the top equal to the drip out the bottom. Both even pour slow enough to allow the coffee level to drop in relation to the inflow so both are equal in particle flow control. I've not noticed any dribble back the spout from either regardless of how slow the pour is or when I stop a pour.

I tried to make a full liter carafe this morning by "overfilling" the Hario and even at the absolute max water in it (well above their MAX level label) it came up about half a cup (3 oz) short of a full liter in the carafe.

To me the kettle volume (0.8 L for Hario 1.0 for Bonavita) is the greatest difference between the two products. I need to make 1 liter which equates to 2 1/2 cups each for both of us in the morning. This is the absolute minimum morning coffee I need. The Bonavita will make a full liter when filled just a little over their listed max water level. Bonavita is listed as a 1 liter kettle but when you factor in the water absorbed by the grounds just a smidgen over a liter is needed to get a full liter of finished coffee.

 
Thanks for the feedback about the slow pouring capability. I was mostly asking from an Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder POV, in that I find my Bonavita will not drip very well when it more that 1/3 full. It certainly pours slow enough but the OCD comment is how I sometimes have the urge to literally add a drop or two of water near the outside edge of the coffee to get that last bit extracted.
 
The Hario is going to take a road trip to Casa Mick Sud for use in smaller brew methods down there.

I've been using it regularly since it arrived and it is fast and convenient, though I appreciate the little extra volume the Bonivita provides.

I need to dig out one of my "spare" 1.7 liter Russell Hobbs tea kettles to keep the Haro company on the trip :)

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