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Badly cracked blade, can it be shortened?

A picture is worth a thousand words..

$Kobar3Crack.jpg

The blade is only 7/16ths so I don't think losing half an inch off the end of the 3 inch blade would be too bad.

But am I asking for trouble if I take a hacksaw or dremel to it?

Anyone tried something similar and can offer any advice?
 
Yes it can shortened and any tip you like can be added. Round ,square,French, Spanish, and the list goes on. When I shorten one I either shorten the heel or toe of the scales too so its a perfect match. : )
 
Great. Any tips on how to approach it?

If I was guessing at how to do it, I'd drill a small hole at top of crack to prevent it spreading, then cut down to the hole to take the end off. Then grind new shape..

Is that a good plan?
 
Just be careful and don't overheat it or you'll ruin the temper.
Temper goes before a color change.
+1

it will happen sooner than you think towards the edge. If you go with the Dremel, just use short bursts followed by a water dunk to keep it cool.
 
I get a large ice cube and sit it on the table. Resting the edge on it, start grinding away the unwanted steel with a sanding drum, always keeping the edge in line with the rotation of the tool (if you try to grind across the blade it will snap). As the blade gets warm it "cuts" deeper into the ice, providing more cooling contact.

If the edge ever gets too got to touch you are in trouble.

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Hack saw won't work. I shorten them occasionally and when I do, I put the blade on a wet cloth and take it easy when dremel-ing it. You might be able to save more of the blade than your drawing represents. Think about just taking out the cancer and then using the material left and make a suitable tip.
 
I use a Dremmel to cut bldes into shorties. I use those very thin cutting wheels that go through a blade very easily. As others have said, you have to be real careful about not ruining the temper though. Don't over heat it.
 
Thanks for all the advice everyone. I've ordered some kevlar gloves with latex grips and a face mask (seemed sensible option as I wear glasses normally) off ebay, so I can begin the restore when these arrive.

I've got a selection of wooden scale blanks on their way to me as well. So I'll get to choose from Zebrawood, Wenge, Walnut, Yellowheart, Padauk, Curly Koa, Redwood Burl, Honduran San Juan, Caribbean Rosewood and Curly Cocobolo for making some new scales. Though I've just won a japanese straight on ebay that needs new scales and I think that's claiming the Curly Koa :)

Funny how this bug bites. I started with straight razors as I thought making cases for them would be a good alternative to knife sheathes (I dabble in leatherwork) with UK's silly knife laws.

So instead of making cases I've expanded into woodwork and metalwork. Still if all goes well, this little shorty is going to need a custom case so I might get back to my original plan eventually :)
 
OOh Yes , i just did a Shumate and did a straight face, i have a big Burbar 6/8 and was thinking of putting in a butchers notch---- whatever you do make sure you do it slow ,as not to over heat the razor---Water---you will need to reshape the scales too- me I have a , professional 12" disc grinder
 
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I've ordered some kevlar gloves with latex grips and a face mask (seemed sensible option as I wear glasses normally) off ebay, so I can begin the restore when these arrive.
Just make sure you feel the blade, if it too hot to touch-it is too hot.
 
+2 - once you get to the edge, the amount of steel present is so little that it heats really fast, and you'll lose the temper before you know it :(



+1

it will happen sooner than you think towards the edge. If you go with the Dremel, just use short bursts followed by a water dunk to keep it cool.
 
Just make sure you feel the blade, if it too hot to touch-it is too hot.

Yeah. I've been digging through the forums and picked up a lot of tips from the gold dollar modifications threads. I know the experts here probably don't use gloves, but for my own peace of mind I'll wear one on the hand holding the blade. The dremel hand will be bare so I can touch test between bursts. The crack actually goes up nearly a third of the blade so in the initial cut off I won't get very near to the edge. The glove is really for that last moment when I'm not sure how the tip will come off, I prefer not have bare flesh too close to it on my first attempt at something like this.

I've done the first step of removing the old scales and my little box of wood arrived today. I'm leaning towards the lemonwood as it's a little thinner than the other blanks and ideal for a thin blade like this.

So just the gloves, face shield some brass washers, and 10ba nuts and bolts to wait for now.
 
so I can touch test between bursts.
Too late.

It will heat to the point of being able to raise a blister within seconds, and cool just as quickly, so you may overheat it and not know it.
You really need to have a finger very, very close to where the grinding is being done, right on the thinnest part of the edge.
 
Too late.

It will heat to the point of being able to raise a blister within seconds, and cool just as quickly, so you may overheat it and not know it.
You really need to have a finger very, very close to where the grinding is being done, right on the thinnest part of the edge.

Ok. Is this without using an ice block? I'd have thought that would have made heat issues obvious with quick melting before it got too hot. Isn't tempering temperature above boiling point of water?
 
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