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Worcestershire sauce

I absolutely love the stuff. I use it as part of a marinade for tougher grades of steaks like Hangar, Skirt and Flank steaks. I also like to add it to chop meat when making hamburgers. I'll also use it straight on some meats as well. It's amazing stuff.
 

oc_in_fw

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I absolutely love the stuff. I use it as part of a marinade for tougher grades of steaks like Hangar, Skirt and Flank steaks. I also like to add it to chop meat when making hamburgers. I'll also use it straight on some meats as well. It's amazing stuff.
Yes, on all counts.
 
I have to say I never looked at the ingredients and would never have thought "anchovies". You learn something new every day.
 
I have to say I never looked at the ingredients and would never have thought "anchovies". You learn something new every day.
Rotted anchovies, no less. The guy who invented it was trying to recreate an Indian sauce and wound up making something that tasted horrible. Story goes that he abandoned the project but didn't throw it away. Variations on the story differ as to why. Some say he intentionally fermented it, some say he intended to try to sell it for use in animal feed but was unable to find a buyer, some say he just forgot about it. At any rate, it fermented and that did the trick.
 
Definitely one of the more important food groups--all in one bottle!

Lea & Perrin's is the standard of the world, I guess, but the most amazing W'shire sauce I've ever had was the stuff Emeril Lagasse brewed up at his flagship restaurant, Emeril in New Orleans.

But back to L&P. It goes in lotsa' stuff here: on grilled cheese sandwiches (as a dip); into burgers and soups; and in the vacuum bags for sous vide cooking. A personal favorite is drizzling the stuff onto onions as I saute them in butter--utter heaven when they are then folded into mashed potatoes.
 
I absolutely love Worcestershire sauce, particularly Lea and Perrins. I literally by it by the gallon.
I use it in a variety of food dishes as an ingredient or as a meat marinade. However I mostly use it almost daily on rice in the way most people would with soy sauce. With my wife being from the Philippines, rice is eaten just about every day, so I keep a good supply on hand.
I once made my own about 12 years ago. It wasn't nearly as good as Lea and Perrins, but it was unmistakably Worcestershire sauce. At the time I had the hardest time getting my hands on anchovy paste and the sour tamarind paste for the recipe. I have to say, after all the work that went into making it and the fermentation wait time, this is one condiment that is just easier for me to buy.
I'll see if I can track down my recipe I used to make it if anyone is interested.
 
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