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Shoe Shining Disorder. What Have I Done!

Argonaut

Moderator Emeritus
Nice! I just hope you have an infinite supply of "spiders"...
Just catch one and set it loose where she can see it once in a while. If she starts to suspect something, get a mouse from the pet store and put it in her curling iron case. That'll buy you a month in the basement on it's own.
 

johnniegold

Moderator Emeritus
Today's shoe: J&M Aldrich II. I hate these shoes. I have relegated them to foul-weather shoes. They are 15 (?) years old and have been re-soled twice. They don't fit quite right after the second re-sole but they get me through a rainy day. So there they are just sitting in the closet taking up a perfectly good set of shoe trees. I decided to show them a little TLC.

Here they
are all full of dust and lackluster.



Brushed off the dust...



Working the bulling technique...



One done...



Finished...



You know what? I don't hate them so much anymore. :rolleyes: I hear it might rain tomorrow. :biggrin:

Shoe s
avants pay top dollar for t-shirts with this type of print on them...



You see someone walking down the street wearing a t-shirt like this and you know they got it bad, and that ain't good. :yesnod:
 
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mark the shoeshine boy

Moderator Emeritus
those look really good, even for rainy day shoes....i have a pair of eccos cap toes (remember i sell cars and i walk a bunch everyday) and my toes looks like that too...it amazes me, because i dont think of them as being a high quality leather shoe....
 
Very nice. I too like to shine shoes. I remember watching my dad shine shoes every Saturday night. The smell of polish takes me back to fond memories of classical music in the air and a man I looked up to.

Enjoy your passion. Someone has to.
 

strop

Moderator Emeritus
Finally had a chance to watch the video. Never knew it was called bulling. I thought everybody shined shoes that way. That's how Dad did it, so that's how I do it.
 

professorchaos

Moderator Emeritus
I am currently thinning the herd....first the closet and then the basement....this picture is older, and the dust that you see is because of lack of rotation...if I had a good rotation, it would a bout a 90 day one....the 15 pair that I settled on now are all worthy of my name....in fact two guys at work look at me shoes daily and shake their heads....

I have a reputation of shined shoes, shaved face, pressed clothes and topped off with a fedora (beaver or straw)....

I am proud to find others that take the time to spit shine the toes and stand out in a crowd....let me warn you guys though, if you have a shoe with one long piece of smooth leather, bullying them from toe to heel is a real treat, like the hood of a show car....now that is the advanced stages of this sickness....
One of the classiest reputations to have.

Still ... a 90 day rotation ... :w00t:
 
As a military man I am impressed. Well done
Yup, I agree. The military was definitely a good thing for teaching me how to put a good shine on a pair of shoes. I never polished a pair of shoes until the Air Force and I definitely got to the point that I could restore a bright shine in next to no time. Now, it's all suede flight boots at work and cowboy boots at home that I don't want a high gloss finish on. I went to a wedding a few months ago and had to break out the polish and brush. It's good to know I can still do it :)
 

johnniegold

Moderator Emeritus
Last night, I did another pair of J&M Aldrich II's (I have this model shoe in several different colors as they are very comfortable and very versatile shoe for work) while watching some playoff hockey and basketball. These shoes are maybe 10 years old, although I must confess they don't get the call in the rotation very often. But after giving them "the treatment", that may very well change. :yesnod:



 
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johnniegold

Moderator Emeritus
Today's task: Putting Mink Oil on a pair of 20+ year old English-made Doc Marten's. This is the Saxon 939 model. I really like the patina that has developed on these boots, especially on the tongue.











I'll let these dry for a couple of hours then brush them and go over them with a chamois to give them a nice finish.
 
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Looking good, Bob! Just finished writing my final exams for the semester. You've just inspired me to pop on a record and break out the shining equipment. Time to relax!
 

professorchaos

Moderator Emeritus
Today's task: Putting Mink Oil on a pair of 20+ year old English-made Doc Marten's. This is the Saxon 939 model. I really like the patina that has developed on these boots, especially on the tongue.











I'll let these dry for a couple of hours then brush them and go over them with a chamois to give them a nice finish.
In their prime!
 
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Great thread!!!! I don't think I've ever shined a shoe :( (dont hate me guys)

I have a wedding next week, i think ill give it a shot! :D
 
Great topic and good to see others in the spirit of nice clean shoes. One question though, the "bulling" technique is what I was taught and use, but all over the shoe/boot, not just the toes. Is that being a little to thorough?

My best effort to date is a pair of mat road bike boots, Italian of course, that I managed to get a mirror shine on. Great for dazzling cagers (car drivers).
 

johnniegold

Moderator Emeritus
In their prime!
Brushed off and laced up... (thinking about some new laces for these)




actually all those shoes on the bed....that's my "to do list"....
Shine every pair of shoes in this picture and post them here one pair of shoes at a time...


I understand this disorder.....this a partial collection....

http://

Go on. I dare you. :wink: :biggrin:



One question though, the "bulling" technique is what I was taught and use, but all over the shoe/boot, not just the toes. Is that being a little to thorough?
My understanding of the bulling technique (and I am far from being an expert) is that it is maximized on the heel cap and the toe cap. See diagram below.



The heel cap and the toe cap are the areas of the shoe where the leather doesn't crease (or at least it should not). The bulling process is a layering of the wax on those areas to build up the shine to a mirror-like finish.

Layering the wax on the vamp and the quarter area could cause the wax to "flake" as you wear the shoe because the leather will begin crease and the wax will not stay in the creases.

(For this general discussion, I won't get into possible differences in results with shell cordovan as opposed to other smooth or corrected-type leather. FWIW, I would not apply that much wax on shell cordovan leather, regardless.)

I am sure that applying wax to a lesser degree in vamp and quarter with the bulling method would develop a nice shine but I don't think to the degree of the toe cap and the heel cap area. If the quarter and the vamp start to flake, then you would have to strip the shoe down and begin again. At least, that is my understanding of the bulling process. If you have had success then I would stick with what works. :cool:
 
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johnniegold

Moderator Emeritus
In honor of Mother's Day. :001_smile

Today's Shoe: Alden Shell Cordovan LHS.




Work in Progress...



Finished...




Come on. Go shine a pair of shoes for Mother's Day. Mom will notice the extra effort. After all, isn't she worth it? :yesnod:
 
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professorchaos

Moderator Emeritus
In honor of Mother's Day. :001_smile

Today's Shoe: Alden Shell Cordovan LHS.




Work in Progress...



Finished...




Come on. Go shine a pair of shoes for Mother's Day. Mom will notice the extra effort. After all, isn't she worth it? :yesnod:
Ahh, a lovely Cordovan glow. Nothing is better.
 
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