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Knots that everyone should know?

I always carry rope/paracord on me if I ever need to tie anything, but I only know around 3 knots. What should I know to tie stuff to cars, tie things together, etc?
 
The ones I use most are the Reef Knot, the Bowline and the Round Turn and two Half Hitches. Very handy on the narrowboat! The Fisherman's knot is also very useful for joining two bits of that plastic baler twine or a polypropylene rope so it doesn't slip.

Many years ago I was thrown out of the Scouts on my third week for having a bad attitude after I showed the Scoutmaster where he was going wrong with his knots demonstration! My late father was an ex WWII navy man and we often practised knots.

Gareth
 
The Bowline

The Double Half Hitch

The Taut Line

These are essential for everyday use, in my opinion, and every man should know how to tie them, as well as how to tie a proper square knot rather than a granny knot. Depending upon your hobbies and interests there are many more.
 
As a fisherman, I know quite a few, but they are relegated to fishing use only for the most part. I do use the "clinch" knot fopr various applications, as well as the "double-surgeons".

I have found this site to be a big help in learning to tie new-to-me knots:

http://www.animatedknots.com/
 
Bowline is a must

after that it's up to you

wagon hitch is useful for lashing down tarps etc

reef knot

clove hitch & or round turn with half hitches
 
I've thought about getting that knot book. I had to learn knots in Scouts and remember the ones I use: square knot, slipknot, Butcher's knot, tow half-hitches, etc. A reference guide would be nice, but I imagine its kind of hard to learn from a book.
 
I've thought about getting that knot book. I had to learn knots in Scouts and remember the ones I use: square knot, slipknot, Butcher's knot, tow half-hitches, etc. A reference guide would be nice, but I imagine its kind of hard to learn from a book.

Actually, that book (and two more Lee Valley books like it) are easy to follow because they use different coloured ropes.

There are resources out there, though. Even flash animation on the web.

http://www.animatedknots.com/

is one example

Regards,

- John
 
I knew about 6, which is what was required of me in fire school. We then had to tie them and lift items with them in front of instructors. This caused me no small amount of distress as I'm dyslexic. I literally practiced for about a days time while watching TV, sitting in the yard etc. . Aced the practical, and quickly forgot them. Back to the knots though, bowline was one they put a lot of emphasis on, bowline on a bight, figure 8, figure 8 on a bight , clove hitch and a few others.
 
I take it a "square knot" is an American term for the reef knot?

I'd forgotten the clove hitch. So simple and useful. I once spent about an hour trying to teach it a bagpiper who was making reeds at my house prior to a gig. He never did get it! Must be something the bagpipes do to the brain. He was using dental floss to hold the shaped pieces of plastic yoghurt pot onto the reed tube. We spend ages trawling the supermarkets to find just the right yoghurt pot! Tesco Blue Stripe was the best but they'd changed the shape of the pot!

Gareth
 
I've found all kinds of uses for the Prusik, holds fast when it's under tension, but when it has slack, can slide. Never used it for climbing though
 
Bowline is essential for securing gear followed by the half hitch and clove hitch and rolling hitch. There are numerous variations on just these few. Also remember that certain knots and bends work best with certain types and sizes of line. If you are securing something important, do the homework and do it right.
 
Family of eights (inline, on a bight, follow through) and hitches (half, clove, timber) are probably the most useful on the ground. Bowline is nice to know but the eight will do the same and is a stronger knot. There are many more but these basic ones will serve most purposes.

I've found all kinds of uses for the Prusik, holds fast when it's under tension, but when it has slack, can slide. Never used it for climbing though

The Prusik is a great inexpensive ascension device.
 
I'm not sure if it has a proper name but in Australia we just call it the "Truckies knot". It's a knot that allows you to tighten down the rope when securing a load to your truck, trailer, roof racks, etc. Very useful.
 
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