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Knockoff Colognes

I can’t find Cobalt in the states anywhere ! 😟
Too bad :(
I have read that the very cheap La Rive Hitfire is a very good clone of CD Fahrenheit.
I have not tried it my self, I have just read about it
 

The Knize

Moderator Emeritus
I had been ignoring this thread. I guess because I do not bother much with inexpensive knock off scents, for various reasons. I guess I find it hard enough to keep up with the original versions of scents. Trying to figure out whether something cheaper is effectively the same or better, seems like an extra layer of difficulty. I do think that relatively expensive scents that smell a lot like another existing scent are an interesting case, but I cannot think of one that seemed identical to the "original."

Some interesting things are said in this thread.
Controversial Statement Alert: I always quietly (not so much now) felt that the original Polo was a bit of a rip-off of Yatagan.
That is an interesting thought. I am a big fan of the original, vintage Polo Green. I think I "get" Yatagan, and respect it, but I do not like it, much less wear it. I do own a fairly vintage bottle of it. But I think that is an astute comment that Yatagan and the original Polo have similarities. I would have to smell them side by side, but I think Featherweight is onto something. I think maybe the perfumer for Polo Green, Carlos Benaim, took some of what makes Yatagan such a striking, original smelling scent, and removed and replaced other of its elements that are off-putting to me and others, to create a scent with mass appeal that is was still quite striking.

I had not realized by the way that Yatagan and Halston Z-14 had the same perfumer, Vincent Marcello. Apparently two out of his only three scents. Apparently a mysterious guy. Carlos Benaim, on the other hand, has been credited with authoring probably hundreds of scents over the years.

Many years ago I had a case with a company that made scents for perfume companies. The president of that company admitted that the difference in the cost to make a $200 fragrance was not that much more than a fragrance selling for $25. He said first the profit margins on fragrances are astronomical having huge markups when sold to manufacturers and then to retailers, and then to customers. He also said the bulk of the cost in the higher cost fragrance is packaging and advertising.
I think there are lots of sources that would generally back that up. I suppose there are some special scents out there that actually use at least real Mysore sandalwood or natural vetiver oils, ingredients that are truly pricey, but not many. And I have read that many scentmakers constantly try to reduce the ingredient costs even though they are a tiny portion of what the scent sells for at wholesale. Nevertheless, to me, there are scents that are truly wonderful, and many/most that are not. Maybe I am fooling myself, but I do not think it is packaging and advertising that makes me think a particular scent is wonderful! It seems amazing to me that anyone can make a scent that truly stands out as wonderful for such a low ingredient cost. I have never seen the numbers, but I wonder if the ingredient costs for say a SMN scent are as low as those for a more commercial, more highly marketed scent.
 

Bhugo

Contributor
I had been ignoring this thread. I guess because I do not bother much with inexpensive knock off scents, for various reasons. I guess I find it hard enough to keep up with the original versions of scents. Trying to figure out whether something cheaper is effectively the same or better, seems like an extra layer of difficulty. I do think that relatively expensive scents that smell a lot like another existing scent are an interesting case, but I cannot think of one that seemed identical to the "original."

Some interesting things are said in this thread.


That is an interesting thought. I am a big fan of the original, vintage Polo Green. I think I "get" Yatagan, and respect it, but I do not like it, much less wear it. I do own a fairly vintage bottle of it. But I think that is an astute comment that Yatagan and the original Polo have similarities. I would have to smell them side by side, but I think Featherweight is onto something. I think maybe the perfumer for Polo Green, Carlos Benaim, took some of what makes Yatagan such a striking, original smelling scent, and removed and replaced other of its elements that are off-putting to me and others, to create a scent with mass appeal that is was still quite striking.

I had not realized by the way that Yatagan and Halston Z-14 had the same perfumer, Vincent Marcello. Apparently two out of his only three scents. Apparently a mysterious guy. Carlos Benaim, on the other hand, has been credited with authoring probably hundreds of scents over the years.



I think there are lots of sources that would generally back that up. I suppose there are some special scents out there that actually use at least real Mysore sandalwood or natural vetiver oils, ingredients that are truly pricey, but not many. And I have read that many scentmakers constantly try to reduce the ingredient costs even though they are a tiny portion of what the scent sells for at wholesale. Nevertheless, to me, there are scents that are truly wonderful, and many/most that are not. Maybe I am fooling myself, but I do not think it is packaging and advertising that makes me think a particular scent is wonderful! It seems amazing to me that anyone can make a scent that truly stands out as wonderful for such a low ingredient cost. I have never seen the numbers, but I wonder if the ingredient costs for say a SMN scent are as low as those for a more commercial, more highly marketed scent.
Spectacular reply.
 

Bhugo

Contributor
Has Polo gotten worse to anyone else's nose as of late? All of them have to me.
None of the more recent formulations compare with the Cosmair versions in scent or longevity to my nose. There was an earlier version, but I never tried it. The Cosmair version is available on eBay for very reasonable prices if you shop around, often cheaper than a new bottle.....
 
I use hitfire ( Fahrenheit) and classic match ( Drakkar Noir ) regularly and both are pretty good.

I’d love to find a decent knockoff of Chaps which was my go to scent growing up.
 
Isn't Stetson supposed to smell like Chaps?
Thanks for the recommendation. I really didn’t get that connection when I smelled Stetson at the store. It remember Chaps didn’t have as much floral and it was more leather, almost closer to English Leather than Stetson.
 

Owen Bawn

"Ask me about a fluffernutter"
I remember reading a post on this site by Joe from Italian Barber in which he claimed that his Razorock Santa Maria del Fiore after shave was in essence the exact same product as the Santa Maria Novella Tabacco Toscano cologne.
 
I use hitfire ( Fahrenheit) and classic match ( Drakkar Noir ) regularly and both are pretty good.

I’d love to find a decent knockoff of Chaps which was my go to scent growing up.
Just now wearing a Hitfire. Great scent.

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Avi

Contributor
I think the fact that this forum can simultaneously talk about dollar store knock offs aka "smells like .. " to Creed (which is at a price point that I did not know existed) and do it in a way that speaks to the underlying traits rather than status [which to be honest I think is difficult to do with fragrances - given much of the marketing allure is tied to allusions to status ], says a lot about the character of folks on this forum in an absolute incredible positive way.
 
I think the fact that this forum can simultaneously talk about dollar store knock offs aka "smells like .. " to Creed (which is at a price point that I did not know existed) and do it in a way that speaks to the underlying traits rather than status [which to be honest I think is difficult to do with fragrances - given much of the marketing allure is tied to allusions to status ], says a lot about the character of folks on this forum in an absolute incredible positive way.
True dat. For example I work 14 hours a day and I'm a simple man. For my customers that I encounter while handing out a food, cheap scent for that 30 seconds works just fine and honestly I enjoy it. When I'm going out or on a date or just family and friends gathering of course I will use more expensive scent. Some knockoffs like armaf and rasasi are more expensive than Davidoff Cool Water, Calvin Klein One or even Boss Bottled that's always discounted.

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I started out my exploration into fragrances by buying a batch of Cuba Paris scents, which are mostly clones, or knockoffs, of well known colognes. That meant my initial investment was low in case this frag thing was just a passing fancy. Now I am fully into scents--though clearly at the "affordable" end of the spectrum--and still interested in the occasional knockoff. Going to try a couple in the Milton Lloyd line after the holidays.
 
I started out my exploration into fragrances by buying a batch of Cuba Paris scents, which are mostly clones, or knockoffs, of well known colognes. That meant my initial investment was low in case this frag thing was just a passing fancy. Now I am fully into scents--though clearly at the "affordable" end of the spectrum--and still interested in the occasional knockoff. Going to try a couple in the Milton Lloyd line after the holidays.
I think fellow user @Hak.1963 used Milton, on similar thread to this one.

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The "Classic Match" line by Belcam is considered a gold standard by many for knock-offs. I haven't tried it yet but hear their version of Drakkar is 95% the same, and some consider it closer to the original formulation than what's currently in production. Others could comment more on this.
I'm a big fan of the classic match clones.
 
Here in the UK I've recently come across a range called Verset. In their pamphlet
it first explains what the "dominant notes" are then suggests a well known fragrance that they are also found in.
I've tried their versions of Paco Rabanne 1 Million, Armani Code, Armani Stronger With You and Boss Bottled next to the originals that I own and blowed if I can tell any difference
 
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