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How to remove paint on mug?

How would one go about removing paint on a ceramic mug, specifically on removing the red paint shown in the mug below?

I was thinking scotch brite or maybe even toothpaste with a towel and a lot of elbow grease, but I'm concerned about scratching (I don't think it will, but maybe?). Would acetone work? My concern with that is if it will discolor the base color of the mug.

If the paint is on top of the glaze, I don't think it'll be an issue. If it's under the glaze, it may not be possible except to remove ceramic which is not something I want to do. If the acetone removes the glaze to get to the paint, that'll work, but I'm concerned that the area will no longer be glazed and it will look damaged in that area.

Thanks in advance!
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iPen; Essentially the white glaze is glass and would not be affected by a strong paint stripper such as an aerosol aircraft paint stripper found at Walmart in the automotive section. If the red is silk-screened paint- it will come right off with the stripper. I hope this helps! God Bless! Tony Brown RN mgbbrown
 
That's good to know that the glaze won't be affected by paint stripper or acetone. At least there's no harm in trying it!
 
I am thinking that is the case- you will know almost immediately! Please keep us posted on your success! God Bless! Tony Brown RN mgbbrown
 
I don't want to sound stupid but, while we are talking about that mug can you guys tell me how it is supposed to be used? My dad got me one and I tried using it like a bowl to build lather in with some success but more awkward clanking and difficulty. Is it supposed to have the puck in the bottom and be used to load AND lather.
Please don't hold my ignorance on this issue against me.
 
CB; From the photograph, the interior appears rounded, making me think that this is more intended as a swirling bowl with a convenient handle. As a vintage shaver, I first used a custard cup, possibly made by a North Carolina pottery, but this was a bit small and the brush handle would hit against the wall of the cup when swirling lather taken from the soap mug rapidly. I then went to a World War II Navy watch cup, which is quite substantial and a great vessel in which to swirl lather in-far less clanking, and it is easy to see why many of these watch cups were removed from the Navy's inventory! Worry not about questions- you know not if you ask not, as they say... God Bless! Tony Brown RN mgbbrown$Custard Bowl Cobalt Oxide Blue Drip Glazed Rim Possible North Carolina Unsigned Maker (800x682).jpg$Navy Watch Cup OPCO Porcelain Full View World War II (761x800).jpg
 

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If the logo is under the glaze, you are probably SOL. If it is on the surface, the suggestions above should work.
 
I'm going to try it on a Burt's Bees mug that I ordered. It will get here soon.

I've used acetone before on coins and paint and it worked very well to clean, so I'm thinking it'll work like a charm.
 
Ok, I tried acetone and it doesn't work, at least not when I dab it with a napkin or when I pour a little over the letters.

However, I can definitely feel the letters if I run my fingers over it.

Acetone is meant for removal of many organic particles, so this leads me to believe that the letters are made of 100% non-organic matter.

I believe I can scrape it off but anything rough will cause micro-scratches.

With time it should rub off, but I think a less abrasive material with some elbow grease should speed up the process.
 
Ok, I tried acetone and it doesn't work, at least not when I dab it with a napkin or when I pour a little over the letters.

However, I can definitely feel the letters if I run my fingers over it.

Acetone is meant for removal of many organic particles, so this leads me to believe that the letters are made of 100% non-organic matter.

I believe I can scrape it off but anything rough will cause micro-scratches.

With time it should rub off, but I think a less abrasive material with some elbow grease should speed up the process.

I would suggest a Mr. Clean Magic Eraser, but you'd want to test somewhere inconspicuous first. Mr. Clean is a micro-abrasive; it might leave unwanted scratches.
 
I'm thinking Isopropyl Alcohol. The kind you would use with a camp stove or can get from the hardware store to clean epoxy or acrylic paint. It should not remove glaze, only the paint. If you are willing to wait a few hours I will try when I get home on a mug I have at home and report back what I find, that way you won't run out to buy something that won't work or will damage your mug.
 
Ok. Tried isopropyl alcohol, paint thinner, micro abrasive rub and a razor on my mug with similar printing. None worked. It looks as it the print is under the glaze.
 
I believe many of these are part of the glazing process. I doubt it would be glaze over letters. The painted glazes, when baked, turns to glass, like the white colored glaze. So your mug probably just has a stamped logo glaze. Probably No clear coat glaze.




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IF it was screen printed, it is either an acrylic base or epoxy base material. The acrylic base material would have worn off (at least a little), with the acetone. A good epoxy base paint will be tougher. It is most likely epoxy, considering it was intended to bond to glaze, go through heat cycles, and get scrubbed every now and then.
You can try soaking in the acetone, perhaps an hour or so, to see if it starts to weaken. Then perhaps it can be scrapped off.
Other than that, any mechanical method will leave evidence of the crime.
 
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