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Had bone marrow for the first time last night. Disappointed.

This was on my list of things to try forever, and I was excited to make it a part of meal at a tapas style restaurant for my wedding anniversary last night. The wife and I were both disappointed. The stuff seems solid, but when a fork or spoon touches it, it somehow magically liquefies leaving you with a fork-full of nothing. We barely got enough out of the bone to split the dish. The presentation was really cool with it still being in the bone and everything, but I wouldn't order it again.

I came here to ask if that restaurant just messed it up, or if this is normal behavior for bone marrow. If it's normal, I don't see why anyone likes the stuff.
 
When I was a child and my father grilled round stakes I always asked for the bone and gobbled up the marrow. My parents thought I was nuts and my sister had to turn away.

I have not had marrow since I was a teenager so can't really remember it very well.

I've never had marrow as a main dish. What type of restaurant was it (was it a specialty restaurant serving ethnic food)?

I have to ask... in true B&B style, did you whip out your camera and take a pic of it?
 
When I was a child and my father grilled round stakes I always asked for the bone and gobbled up the marrow. My parents thought I was nuts and my sister had to turn away.

I have not had marrow since I was a teenager so can't really remember it very well.

I've never had marrow as a main dish. What type of restaurant was it (was it a specialty restaurant serving ethnic food)?

I have to ask... in true B&B style, did you whip out your camera and take a pic of it?
It was a "modern fusion cuisine" restaurant specializing in tapas but also with larger more traditional entrees. Everything but the marrow was incredible. I had the best Ahi Tuna Tartare I've ever eaten in my life there. I didn't get a pic, unfortunately, since the auto-focus on my smartphone camera is broken and makes everything look fuzzy.
 

ackvil

Moderator Emeritus
Contributor
I cook lamb shanks in a tomato sauce and the marrow from it is nowhere close to liquid. It tastes great, too.
 

ChefJohnBoy-ardee

Contributor
Too many ways to cook marrow- plus you either love it or hate it and want nothing to do with it ever again. I love the marrow when I do Osso Bucco but dont'' really care for it other ways. It is decent if you can slip it out of the beef shank (salt brine helps) then dredge and pan fry it but it takes a while to salt brine it.
 

joshmpdx

Moderator Emeritus
A spoon works better than a fork. It should be more gelatinous than runny.

Try getting it cut from a local butcher. It's important each side of the bone is open to the marrow.

Roast at 450 for 20 minutes

Drizzle with a nice aged balsamic vinegar and spread marrow on toast.
 
It's important each side of the bone is open to the marrow.
Maybe that was the problem... the bone was cut length-wise so it was open on one side and closed on the other. It definitely was NOT gelatinous. Like I said, it more or less liquefied when the spoon touched it. I liked the flavor well enough, by the way.
 
I've never had it with the bone cut open length wise, that's odd. Rather, I have just had it cut at a right angle to the bone, imagine a femur cut in half in the middle at a right angle and you get the idea. Love me some marrow on the Ray's Burgers.

Unlike others that cook it at 450, I settle for 375 for about 25 minutes, any more and it will be liquid. Better to have it be a little pink on the inside rather than too liquidy. The texture may be offputting.

I suspect different animals may taste slightly different too. I rarely have beef bone marrow and have also tried goat and lamb. Bison bone marrow is the best in my mind, used to call it Prarie Butter. If you cook at home, save the bones in the freezer and then make bone marrow broth out of them. In some antique shops you may find marrow spoons, long and slender with a rectangular shaped head they are ideal for getting the marrow out. If you don't have one, something like this measuring spoon works best: http://www.amazon.com/RSVP-Enduranc...&qid=1370027532&sr=8-13&keywords=teaspoon+set
 

Hirsute

Used to have fun with Commander Yellow Pantyhose
I've had marrow in bones cut lengthwise and agree with everyone else--it should be gelatinous, not liquid. And a long bone has quite a bit I marrow when split that way. I'm guessing they cooked it to hot or long and liquified it and left a crust on top.
 
Yes, it should jiggle, not pour. I had it a few times before I finally got what all the fuss was about. It can be a subtle flavor but now I really like it. The way I've usually had it served is in the bone with a small spoon to spread it on toasts. Try it once or twice more before you give up, and try it somewhere else.

Scott
 

professorchaos

Moderator Emeritus
Crusty grilled bread, coarse sea salt and a parsley, shallot and caper salad plus bone marrow = heaven.

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Luc

Moderator Emeritus
Using bones with marrow is one of the reasons why the spaghetti sauce or any broth, soup that I make is so tasty! It's packing flavour and it's pretty awesome just like that, I love it. if it's solid, it's no good. I would suggest trying it at home. Your grocery store should have some bones for sale or the butcher will have some for sure.
 
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