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First shavette shave, maybe last

I had a nice shave this morning with an edge off my SB ark...didn't miss the shavette even a little bit lol
I'll probably take it for another test drive soon tho.
 

steveclarkus

Goose Poop Connoisseur
I'd been wanting to try a shavette for a while now. I've been face shaving with a straight since Feb. of 2014 and haven't looked back. Head shaves are still DE though.
These past 6 years I've always kinda wondered what a shavette would be like. I finally asked for a cheap one for Christmas and tried it out today.

Sheesh...I think I'll stick with my coticule finished straights.
Soooooo different.
Virtually no feedback(or maybe just different feedback that I can't read yet)
Very heavy scales make it a bit unwieldy(and even more difficult to maintain pressure and angle)
I never thought Derby blades were terribly sharp when I used to use them with my DE...they're sharp...and they can't discern skin from hair.
I can see how people would describe a shavette as requiring you to have perfect technique. However, the lack of feedback makes it nearly impossible for me to realize my angle or pressure is off until it's too late.

Not sure when/if I'll pull out this shavette again but a couple nicks are going to have to heal up first!!!!

I use a shavette on occasion and find I get excellent results and use Derby blades. Heavy scales could actually be the problem. I don’t like heavy scales on any straight razor but all that aside, they require a delicate touch and angle. Don’t give up on it. They are worth knowing how to use, especially for travel.
 
I tried using my new CJB w/ Dorco blade the other day. The cheeks were okay but I didn't like the high angle required by the lack of sharpness. Touching the blade to my skin under the jawline gave me The No Feeling. For somebody like myself that lives a bit of a rough existence - no dishwasher, heat with wood stove, etc - shaving with a SR might not be the best idea because joints get beat up, hampering dexterity. At some point I'll probably try upping the sharpness with a pack of Prolines, just to say that I've given the SR a shot.
 
DON'T QUIT!! Yes a shavette is a steep learning curve, but you can do it. You want to stretch as much as possible, use the flattest angle you can, and the lightest touch possible.

I am a long time user of the Artist Club format and it is now my go to. It took me many months to master and then to perfect my technique.

I have never used the DE variety, but seeing how pleased I am with the FAC format, I can't see me trying the other any time soon.
 
DON'T QUIT!! Yes a shavette is a steep learning curve, but you can do it. You want to stretch as much as possible, use the flattest angle you can, and the lightest touch possible.

I am a long time user of the Artist Club format and it is now my go to. It took me many months to master and then to perfect my technique.

I have never used the DE variety, but seeing how pleased I am with the FAC format, I can't see me trying the other any time soon.
I agree 100%, it took my about 50 shaves to get my technique correct. First Shavette shave took my approximately 45 minutes, I can get a great close shave in less than 5 mins now. Perseverance is definitely the key. It's well worth the effort
 
DON'T QUIT!! Yes a shavette is a steep learning curve, but you can do it. You want to stretch as much as possible, use the flattest angle you can, and the lightest touch possible.

I am a long time user of the Artist Club format and it is now my go to. It took me many months to master and then to perfect my technique.

I have never used the DE variety, but seeing how pleased I am with the FAC format, I can't see me trying the other any time soon.
I'm with these guys. Feather SS shave number 101 this morning. I'm still learning, but getting great shaves in the meantime.
 
I know that the biggest issue for me will be having so many straights that I enjoy shaving with and there's just no mojo with a stamped stainless steel shavette. A custom set of scales might help. I'll have to dig through my scraps and see what I can come up with...rosewood, maple, mahogany, or mulberry probably.

That shave with the shavette was the only shave in the last 6 years that hasn't been with a straight razor...that's also working against me...can't put them on the back burner long enough.
 
Just like anything else, shavettes take practice and skill. Ive got a Parker SRW and an Equinox shavette and I like them both. I find that I get close, smooth shaves in only 2 passes.
Id agree to moving past Derbys or Sharks once you develop a little skill. Ive tried Astra and Personna Lab Blues in mine and really like them because they are so smooth.
Ive used Feather AC shavettes in the past and theyre nice but theyre expensive, the blades are expensive and I dont like the notion of being locked into using only AC style blades. I like shavettes that use halved DE blades because I can use them in the shavette or in a safety razor.
Ive got a Dubl Duck traditional straight too but Im not really into the stropping and honing and I kind of hate how careful you have to be with keeping the razor away from moisture so that it doesnt rust. With my Parker or Equinox, I can rinse it out with water, leaving it in the stand near the sink and not worry about it. I use a blade in it a few times, swap out the blade when it gets dull and dont worry about it.
To me, comparing a shavette to a traditional straight is like comparing a pickup truck to a Ferrari. One you can use day in and day out, abuse it a little bit and not worry about it. The other is amazing and wonderful in its own right but requires a bit of care and requires that you baby it a bit (strop it, hone it every now and then and keep the blade dry and oiled so that it doesnt rust). I love my Dubl Duck and kind of want to pick up a Boker or a Dovo but I dont love the maintenance of them.
 
I'm a bit terrified. It took 2 years to perfect my DE razor shaving skill. A shavette seems more difficult to learn than a straight razor.
 
It is, but it took me a week to feel comfortable with a shavette (same with a straight razor). If I remember correctly, using safety razor had no learning curve for me.
 
I started practising on a shavette before transitioning to a straight.
Early dues were paid lightly with blood. But a valuable experience.
I might be in the minority but I find shavette easer to use than a heavier
7/8 full hollow grind (handling-wise). However, the quality and feel of the straight
is superior.
 
@Tester28 Do you know a minimal way to maintain a straight razor? I want minimal maintenance.
If you want sharper than sharp check out slash McCoy's "the method", probably the cheapest way and most straight forward way to get a SR shave ready and only maintain the edge with a 0.1 balsa and stropping before/after every shave.
If you already have stones the finishing stone should be enough for maintenance.(considering you have made every step of the way correct)
But a must is stropping before every shave to maintain the edge.
I don't find the maintenance tedious or boring, you almost need to like it with SRs.
 
Used a proline the other day with my shavette and blackland vector. Both extremely smooth and comfortable shaves and I do prefer straights over any. Think I found my favorite shavette razor.


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@Tester28 Do you know a minimal way to maintain a straight razor? I want minimal maintenance.
I wanted a minimalist set up too and Im alarmed by the amount of stuff I had to buy just to
maintain one straight razor. The balsa strop method is good and reliable but you have to get
your edge up to a certain sharpness before it works (at least 12-14K).

A minimal requirement would be:

1. Leather strop
2. A Naniwa 3/10K 2-in-1 combistone....3K to set the bevel, 10K to finish
(this is in case you ever dull the edge and need to reset the bevel,
it's practically guaranteed that you will)
3. 1micron lapping film + Acrylic/Tile/Glass to place it on. (this
film provides the 12/14K grit finish before you move to the balsa progression.
4. 3 pieces of balsa + 3 acrylic blocks + Glue Spray
5. Diamond compound/paste: 0.5 /0.25/0.01 microns.
6. Loupe or USB microscope to check your edge (I got this but don't use it)
7. Various grits of wet/dry sandpaper: 220/400/600/800/1200 (this is to lap
the balsa wood and the Naniwa stone before first use and periodically).
 
I have a very nicked head right now after some stubborn attempts with head shaves with a Parker SRX. I've had a sampler pack of blades I decided to try. Astra, Gillette Blue, and a couple others I can't remember off hand. The styptic pencil got a lot of use lately. I'll probably still to a DE once I've healed up, but want to give a few of the suggestions here a try. I did use a Irving Shavette with an Artist Pro SE with some success in my first shave so I may give that a try again.

I've never used a true straight. The popular opinion makes me think I've gone about SE shaving in the wrong order.
 
I have a very nicked head right now after some stubborn attempts with head shaves with a Parker SRX. I've had a sampler pack of blades I decided to try. Astra, Gillette Blue, and a couple others I can't remember off hand. The styptic pencil got a lot of use lately. I'll probably still to a DE once I've healed up, but want to give a few of the suggestions here a try. I did use a Irving Shavette with an Artist Pro SE with some success in my first shave so I may give that a try again.

I've never used a true straight. The popular opinion makes me think I've gone about SE shaving in the wrong order.
I have NEVER attempted a straight or shavette on a head shave and I don't see myself ever giving it a go either. As lumpy and bumpy as my head is there's no way I'm willing to spill as much blood as it would take to build the muscle memory I would need.

Any one of my Gillettes with a GSB blade is as fast, easy, and close as a head shave could ever be for me.

You're a braver man than me.

If I were ever to try it then a straight would my choice with a coticule edge...forgiving enough to not look like Edward scissor hands had done the shave for me...

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I started to shave my head abit with a straight (sides and back of my head) when my electric buzzer broke. I tried a DE, but all that hair, could not move an inch before it got clogged. At that point I thought what the heck, pulled out my straight and swish, went through all that hair like it was nothing. Was abit nervous but not as scared when I first shaved my face with a straight, especially around the neck area.
I still have respect for open blades, but I got used to what it is, a very effective tool.
I even handed the straight over to my wife to line up the hair at the back of my head, she was abit scared though lol.
 
Most of the 1/2 DE shavettes on the market have exposed corners. Something like the Focus R28 Slim Al or Vanta enclose the corners and make the razor much easier and safer to use
 
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