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Differentiating Between Goodwill types

Look here, at the top two razors.
http://www.mr-razor.com/Rasierer/Goodwill/Goodwill.htm


I can't believe that there is no nomenclature differentiation between such different razors. If there is one, I would like to know what it is, so I can accurately/precisely name my favorite razor (on the right).

If not, I propose we call them the "Old-style Goodwill" (on the left) and the "NEW-Style Goodwill" (on the right).
It is pretty obvious that the first is based on the Old style razor; curved head with no notch or groove, while the right side is based on the NEW type head, groove in the center, comb is notched for the cap, and the cap has locator pins on the corners for the blade notches.

Anybody have any ideas about existing names, or thoughts on the proposed naming scheme?
 
My understanding is that all Goodwill razors are Old Type left over parts remachined to be mechanically more like NEW style razors. Due to the parts available at the time appearances can vary.
 
My understanding is that all Goodwill razors are Old Type left over parts remachined to be mechanically more like NEW style razors. Due to the parts available at the time appearances can vary.


I don't buy it. The right side example is clearly made from a NEW comb section (what is the proper term for the middle part of a 3 piece razor?) and a cap that is unlike any other Gillette cap I know of.
 
I looked it up, from the Krumholtz guide:

"The major reason the Goodwill idea was promoted was to wean the public away from the old three-hole 'No Stropping, No Honing' blades in favour of the new long slot blades. The old style blades would not work in Goodwills, of course, nor would they work in the NEW GILLETTEs."

"There are two distinct styles of Goodwill razors, and it must be understood thatthe Goodwills were made up from parts - parts from Old Type razors and parts from NEW GILLETTEs. The only concession made for the Goodwill was the #160 cap, which was manufactured solely for the use of the Goodwill series.

The most common version of the Goodwill is the Standard Goodwill #160. The indented #160 cap was designed to accept the 'reverse studs' of all Goodwills made up from NEW GILLETTE parts. The #160 guard was a NEW GILLETTE guard that had not had the centre slot milled, but had two diamond reverse studs created in a punch press. By reverse studs, I mean that the studs went through or into the cap of the guard, rather than the studs being placed in the cap, and going through the guard."

"Another type of Goodwill made up from NEW GILLETTE parts was the Special Goodwill #175 which used a #160 cap. The guard was the same as found on the Standard Goodwill, except this razor had received the milling operation of the centre slot. The guard is different from that of normal NEW GILLETTES in that it has the protruding 'reverse studs' punched in. This razor was produced in extremely small quantities only in 1931.

The last version made from NEW GILLETTE parts was the Special Goodwill #170. This razor retained the #160 cap but featured two 'L' shaped studs punched into the guard. These took the place of the diamond-shaped reverse studs. This version was also produced in extremely small quantities only in 1931.

All other Goodwills were fabricated from surplus Old Type parts; two versions of these razors were produced. The first of these was the #162 Reverse Stud Goodwill. This razor features reverse studs in the diamond shape that were punched in the Old Type guard in the same manner as the standard Goodwill. The cap had the same diamond-shaped holes punched out which corresponded to the studs. Also, corner positioning posts were bent into the cap ends. This razor was produced only in 1934.

The #164 Reverse Stud Goodwill was made in a similar fashion. The difference is that the guard had a slotted centre hole and the cap had 'inside slot positioning posts' that corresponded to the guard's slot. This razor was only produced during 1931.

The tops of the caps of both the #162 and #164 Goodwills were embossed with a tasteful decoration that borders the punched out diamond holes."
 
Beautiful!

I have a 162 Old and a 175 NEW type.

Thank you extremely very much for this post. It ought to be put on the Wiki.
 
I looked it up, from the Krumholtz guide:

"The major reason the Goodwill idea was promoted was to wean the public away from the old three-hole 'No Stropping, No Honing' blades in favour of the new long slot blades. The old style blades would not work in Goodwills, of course, nor would they work in the NEW GILLETTEs."

"There are two distinct styles of Goodwill razors, and it must be understood thatthe Goodwills were made up from parts - parts from Old Type razors and parts from NEW GILLETTEs. The only concession made for the Goodwill was the #160 cap, which was manufactured solely for the use of the Goodwill series.

The most common version of the Goodwill is the Standard Goodwill #160. The indented #160 cap was designed to accept the 'reverse studs' of all Goodwills made up from NEW GILLETTE parts. The #160 guard was a NEW GILLETTE guard that had not had the centre slot milled, but had two diamond reverse studs created in a punch press. By reverse studs, I mean that the studs went through or into the cap of the guard, rather than the studs being placed in the cap, and going through the guard."

"Another type of Goodwill made up from NEW GILLETTE parts was the Special Goodwill #175 which used a #160 cap. The guard was the same as found on the Standard Goodwill, except this razor had received the milling operation of the centre slot. The guard is different from that of normal NEW GILLETTES in that it has the protruding 'reverse studs' punched in. This razor was produced in extremely small quantities only in 1931.

The last version made from NEW GILLETTE parts was the Special Goodwill #170. This razor retained the #160 cap but featured two 'L' shaped studs punched into the guard. These took the place of the diamond-shaped reverse studs. This version was also produced in extremely small quantities only in 1931.

All other Goodwills were fabricated from surplus Old Type parts; two versions of these razors were produced. The first of these was the #162 Reverse Stud Goodwill. This razor features reverse studs in the diamond shape that were punched in the Old Type guard in the same manner as the standard Goodwill. The cap had the same diamond-shaped holes punched out which corresponded to the studs. Also, corner positioning posts were bent into the cap ends. This razor was produced only in 1934.

The #164 Reverse Stud Goodwill was made in a similar fashion. The difference is that the guard had a slotted centre hole and the cap had 'inside slot positioning posts' that corresponded to the guard's slot. This razor was only produced during 1931.

The tops of the caps of both the #162 and #164 Goodwills were embossed with a tasteful decoration that borders the punched out diamond holes."
+1

have a look to this old GoodWill thread
 
Looks like I have a #164 in a case.............thanks for the information TSWebster

Edit it seems like I have a #175 special not the #164.......
 
Last edited:
The English-made Goodwill razors had a circular depression in the top section (as opposed to the square or diamond-shape depressions in the USA versions), not sure why they were different though.
 
I looked it up, from the Krumholtz guide:

"The major reason the Goodwill idea was promoted was to wean the public away from the old three-hole 'No Stropping, No Honing' blades in favour of the new long slot blades. The old style blades would not work in Goodwills, of course, nor would they work in the NEW GILLETTEs."

"There are two distinct styles of Goodwill razors, and it must be understood thatthe Goodwills were made up from parts - parts from Old Type razors and parts from NEW GILLETTEs. The only concession made for the Goodwill was the #160 cap, which was manufactured solely for the use of the Goodwill series.

The most common version of the Goodwill is the Standard Goodwill #160. The indented #160 cap was designed to accept the 'reverse studs' of all Goodwills made up from NEW GILLETTE parts. The #160 guard was a NEW GILLETTE guard that had not had the centre slot milled, but had two diamond reverse studs created in a punch press. By reverse studs, I mean that the studs went through or into the cap of the guard, rather than the studs being placed in the cap, and going through the guard."

"Another type of Goodwill made up from NEW GILLETTE parts was the Special Goodwill #175 which used a #160 cap. The guard was the same as found on the Standard Goodwill, except this razor had received the milling operation of the centre slot. The guard is different from that of normal NEW GILLETTES in that it has the protruding 'reverse studs' punched in. This razor was produced in extremely small quantities only in 1931.

The last version made from NEW GILLETTE parts was the Special Goodwill #170. This razor retained the #160 cap but featured two 'L' shaped studs punched into the guard. These took the place of the diamond-shaped reverse studs. This version was also produced in extremely small quantities only in 1931.

All other Goodwills were fabricated from surplus Old Type parts; two versions of these razors were produced. The first of these was the #162 Reverse Stud Goodwill. This razor features reverse studs in the diamond shape that were punched in the Old Type guard in the same manner as the standard Goodwill. The cap had the same diamond-shaped holes punched out which corresponded to the studs. Also, corner positioning posts were bent into the cap ends. This razor was produced only in 1934.

The #164 Reverse Stud Goodwill was made in a similar fashion. The difference is that the guard had a slotted centre hole and the cap had 'inside slot positioning posts' that corresponded to the guard's slot. This razor was only produced during 1931.

The tops of the caps of both the #162 and #164 Goodwills were embossed with a tasteful decoration that borders the punched out diamond holes."
I want to correct the mis-information in this post since I've seen this all over the internet and it seems to be this post is what everyone uses and has shared everywhere when trying to figure out their Goodwill.

For the #162 Reverse Stud Goodwill, it says that it was produced only in 1934. But the Krumholz book specifically says, "This razor was produced only in 1931." Not 1934. I just got the Krumholz book. If you have it, turn to page 236. Then look at the bottom right-hand corner where it talks about the #162. You'll see 1931.

I've also corrected it on the Wiki page. http://wiki.badgerandblade.com/Goodwill
 
The English-made Goodwill razors had a circular depression in the top section (as opposed to the square or diamond-shape depressions in the USA versions), not sure why they were different though.
are they similar to the Canadians Goodwills too.
 
I want to correct the mis-information in this post since I've seen this all over the internet and it seems to be this post is what everyone uses and has shared everywhere when trying to figure out their Goodwill.

For the #162 Reverse Stud Goodwill, it says that it was produced only in 1934. But the Krumholz book specifically says, "This razor was produced only in 1931." Not 1934. I just got the Krumholz book. If you have it, turn to page 236. Then look at the bottom right-hand corner where it talks about the #162. You'll see 1931.

I've also corrected it on the Wiki page. http://wiki.badgerandblade.com/Goodwill
Very good research, i too read that in the Kruholz book since you pointed it it out. Thank you for updating Wiki and educating us about the Goodwill razor. I know more than and can pass on on your links and help others as needed. Thanks to Macdaddy/Porter too for the info from another Goodwill link.
 
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