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Soft cookie recipe?

I make some darn good chocolate chip cookies, but they get hard as soon as they cool

I've notice that the one you buy don't( nabisco's chips ahoy chewy chocolate chip)






I want to make them stay chewy, any help!!
 
The recipe I use is on the back of a butter flavored crisco can with a couple modifications. I add extra dark brown sugar, it makes 'em gooey. I also don't add in the nuts. Spoon 'em onto a baking sheet covered in parchment paper...wham, gooey, chewy, not crunchy cookies.
 
This is a good discussion
http://www.sunset.com/food-wine/techniques/perfect-chocolate-chip-cookie-00400000012170/

That's more than I know about it, but if I want a softer cookie, I spend time to blend the flour with the butter, add 1/4 cup extra sugar, and an extra spoon of water or vanilla. The sugar comes to the surface and makes it nice and shiny, and that layer seems to prevent evaporation. I also like to raise the oven temperature about 25F, which seems to cook the sugar coating faster and shinier. I don't think it's as simple as doing one thing, like adding more liquid, adjusting temperature, or adjusting cooking time, but it's a combination of things to balance and trade off. If you mix them wrong the cookie can come out undercooked instead of well baked but still soft. I definitely don't always get it right.

As for those Elves, they have very precise timers and fancy hot ovens and access to some serious Elven alchemists. Just what is a dough conditioner anyway?
 
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Search the food network site for Alton Broan's recipe called "the chewy." In the episode where he makes them he goes into the science of what makes cookies crunchy vs chewy, cakey vs flat, etc.
 
I know that if you put a piece of bread in Tupperware with the cookies they will get soft again. But only for so long
 
Some highlights from the alton brown recipe: substitute bread flour for all purpose, use melted butter instead of softened, and cut back on your baking powder. If you can stand the wait letting the dough sit covered in the fridge for a few hours to overnight will help quite a bit too.

I use the aforementioned recipe every time (usually double it) and the cookies stay chewy sitting on a counter for at least 24 hours. In a sealed container like tupperware they'll go at least 5 days (I've never had a batch last longer than that!).
 
Search the food network site for Alton Broan's recipe called "the chewy." In the episode where he makes them he goes into the science of what makes cookies crunchy vs chewy, cakey vs flat, etc.
+1!!! Alton's the man. Great episode and should answer all your questions. (Some good recipes in that one too if I recall - like the one on the back of the bag...)
 
Search the food network site for Alton Broan's recipe called "the chewy." In the episode where he makes them he goes into the science of what makes cookies crunchy vs chewy, cakey vs flat, etc.
+3 All the of recipes from this episode come out great. I've tried them all, but the "Chewy" are my favorites. I'll make a batch, scoop out the cookies and freeze them before I cook them. Then, when I need a fix, I take a few out and bake them. Ok, I eat a lot of them raw out of the freezer too.

If you want to try something a little different, substitute some of the flour for whole wheat flour.
 
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