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I need a reamer

Kentos

Wiped out at 25
Any suggestions? I have seen some with multiple cutting sizes, some adjustable, etc. I have a good sum of money sunk into my Briars so I am willing to pay a bit more to keep them in tip top shape.
 

simon1

Self Ignored by Vista
I'm interested in this thread. I've thought about getting a Senior reamer or something like the Pipenet, but I haven't picked up a pipe that is real cruddy and needs real work. For the pipes I have the butner reamer has worked well for me.

Dang you Kent! Now you've gotten me to looking for pipes on fleabay and trying to decide which good reamer to get.

I'd probably just use the proper sized drill bit or machine shop reamer, set it up in a vise under the press, and just use one of these that I have. I know...that's not quite in the spirit of things.

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I primarily use - and highly recommend - the Pipenet-style (multiple cutting bores). I have the Castleford version: a fraction of the cost of the Pipenet, and gets the job done admirably. The blades are not as sturdy as the Pipenet's, but unless you're regularly cleaning up severely gunked up bowls, that shouldnt be an issue. I've had mine for about seven years with zero problems. The only downfall to these types of reamer is that they're only good for U-bore pipes. For V-bores, I use the Savinelli reamer (similar in function to the one Micah posted). The Butner-type (adjustable) reamer allegedly works for either, but I don't trust them - I've heard too many stories of gouged bowls.
 

simon1

Self Ignored by Vista
Oh, Kent...on that Sav. 315 you asked about in another thread...when it got a ton of cake on it I just used my Case pocket knife. You just need to be careful.
 

Kentos

Wiped out at 25
Well time to do some online research! Seems with all the different drilled pipes I have I am going to need multiple tools.

The idea of getting the same drill bit used to drill out the chamber is intriguing as well.
 

simon1

Self Ignored by Vista
Thanks Mike! I think I would hesitant to take a pocketknife to my BL LE :lol:!

I hear ya. Now I need to go look for my oyster shuckin' knives and try one of them.

Dag nabbit...there is always something else to try. But it's getting to be oyster season, so it wouldn't hurt to dig the oyster knives out.

Now I need to go to the Louisiana coast or Savannah again for fresh oysters...it never ends.

I'm turning off the computer.
 

simon1

Self Ignored by Vista
Well time to do some online research! Seems with all the different drilled pipes I have I am going to need multiple tools.

The idea of getting the same drill bit used to drill out the chamber is intriguing as well.

If you use a drill press you'd have to know how to set the pipe up properly, or whatever you're drilling or reaming, underneath the tool. Using a proper sized machine shop reamer by hand would probably work well, but they are expensive. I know...I've gotten in trouble more than one time for breaking a reamer when I worked in shops. Those aren't cheap.
 

Hirsute

Used to have fun with Commander Yellow Pantyhose
Looks like it might need some skill to use?

Surprisingly little. It’s very easy to use, and you just go slow and gentle. No big worries. I also use a straight bladed pocket knife with a rounded tip. I’ve found it’s better to have a tool and exercise some control, than one of the specialty Reamers.


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simon1

Self Ignored by Vista
Surprisingly little. It’s very easy to use, and you just go slow and gentle. No big worries. I also use a straight bladed pocket knife with a rounded tip. I’ve found it’s better to have a tool and exercise some control, than one of the specialty Reamers.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

That's what I'm talkin' 'bout. It's not rocket science. I use the sheep's foot blade on my Case pocket knife. Just don't gouge the bottom of the bowl...gentle hand. The oyster knife does look good though...never thought of that. I'll have to dig mine out.
 

nortac

"Can't Raise an Eyebrow"
I've done similar with a Dremel and a small sanding drum, I usually just use the "spoon" on my tamper. When I was acquiring vintage pipes off the bay, I used a simple Butner type tool and then I got a vintage "Senior" adjustable reamer, which worked fine for most bowls, but did not adjust enough for really large bowls.
 

Kentos

Wiped out at 25
Thanks for all the input guys.

My pipes have minor build up and some little bits of dottle stuck here and there to the walls that can’t be dislodged with a pipe cleaner so gonna try the put the oyster shucker.

Then down the line pick up the t-handle type.
 
I’ve had a variety of different reamers, but the one I use the most, that I feel gives me the best control, is this one:

Pipe Tools & Supplies Low Country Reamer | Buy Pipe Tools & Supplies Pipe Accessories at Smokingpipes



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+1 I have used a bunch of the highly touted reamers, and they all were a gigantic pain the *** whenever pipe dimensions didn't exactly fit its intended use. Then I switched to that one and it removed all of the headaches of reaming oddly shaped bowls.
 

nortac

"Can't Raise an Eyebrow"
If all you're reaming are pipes that you have minimal build up from your own use, the "T-Handle" types are probably over kill. If you are dealing with heavily caked relics, then that's another thing entirely.
 
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