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First "good" strop

Since it looks like this straight razor shaving actually may work after all, I've ordered an Illinois strop, the 127. Not sure how I can go wrong with it, and it seems to be endorsed pretty well.

If anyone would care to share any tips for this, certainly a better strop than what I have, please wade in. I left my ego at the door when I came in................

And hope everyone has a safe holiday weekend.

Rich
 

Kentos

Wiped out at 25
I don't have one, but my advice would be to use it and enjoy it!

Grats on the successful transition!
 

Slash McCoy

I freehand dog rockets
Take care not to nick it and you are good to go. Every month or so, rub it with a drop or two of neatsfoot oil or similar leather dressing, using lots of rub and little oil. This will help keep it from cracking as it ages.

FWIW I like a wider strop, like the "Big Daddy" which is my favorite, and I like strops with removable hardware that enable me to swap ends, so the right and left edges of the strop both get wear. But your strop is a good one and you will enjoy it for many years to come.
 
Every month or so, rub it with a drop or two of neatsfoot oil or similar leather dressing, using lots of rub and little oil. This will help keep it from cracking as it ages.
Does adding neatsfoot oil change the draw. I have read it increases the draw on most leather. I usually rub my palm over the strop before use.
 

Slash McCoy

I freehand dog rockets
Usually it will increase the draw slightly, in my experience. It makes it more supple, yielding, and conforming to the edge, so there is slightly more grab. But the alternative is to let the strop eventually dry out and start cracking. And a tiny bit more draw isn't necessarily a bad thing, once you got stropping down pat.

Users of tallow based soaps can just rub a little lather into the strop. Not sure if glycerine based soap works or not, but I think it ought to.
 
Oils from your hand is sufficient enough to keep your strop from drying out in most cases. It's all I use.
 
Usually it will increase the draw slightly, in my experience. It makes it more supple, yielding, and conforming to the edge, so there is slightly more grab. But the alternative is to let the strop eventually dry out and start cracking. And a tiny bit more draw isn't necessarily a bad thing, once you got stropping down pat.

Users of tallow based soaps can just rub a little lather into the strop. Not sure if glycerine based soap works or not, but I think it ought to.
i agree i use neadsfoot, and it sharpens right up and flexes with the blade, all draw means is less speed and i am in no need for speed
 
The Illinois strops are decent commercial grade strops.

I have a Russian leather 827 which I like.

They don't hold a candle to the ones Tony makes though...

Advice when using a strop in the beginning is to take your time, concentrate and don't let your mind wander. It is all too easy to get memorized by the stropping motion and let your mind go into neutral. If you concentrate on x stroke reps, count and reverse this helps. As soon as you stop paying attention you will nick your strop. After some time it will become natural but until then you run the risk of slicing your strop so don't get lackadaisical unless you want to keep the strop manufactures in business by buying a lot more strops than you need to.

It is always good to start slow until you get the motion locked in. No matter how long you have been stropping this is a good idea. That way you get the motion locked in to start with then you can get to your stropping speed after your hand and arm are "in the groove"
 
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