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Film honing demo on youtube

Part 1. Setting the bevel via the burr method.




 
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I was looking for film honing videos on youtube earlier today. I knew I should have checked here, first :)

Thanks!
 
Hey, just bumping this as I appreciate the videos. My sanding and tumbler restore is going about as well as I'd hoped, have some film on the way and need to pick up some granite or marble tile. Also, need to get some nickel/silver or stainless stuff for pinning although I'm wondering if I can find it cheaper than a $15 kit.

Anyway, thanks for the vids. Had the basic idea, but it's nice to actually see someone going through all the paces and adding a few details.
 
Hey, just bumping this as I appreciate the videos. My sanding and tumbler restore is going about as well as I'd hoped, have some film on the way and need to pick up some granite or marble tile. Also, need to get some nickel/silver or stainless stuff for pinning although I'm wondering if I can find it cheaper than a $15 kit.

Anyway, thanks for the vids. Had the basic idea, but it's nice to actually see someone going through all the paces and adding a few details.
Google "microfasteners". Microfasteners makes some nice 1/16" bolts, nuts and washers that work great for temporary setup, and if you like, you can do away with the nut, round off the bolt head, cut to length and peen the end down over a washer. Or just cut the bolt off flush on the nut, and your pin is easily removed with the appropriate size micro nutdriver or small pliers. Is nickel-silver better? Sure. Stainless? Not for pins. Washers, maybe. Last time I pinned a razor up, I was on a ship. I cut a brass hasp up into little strips, filed them into rod shapes and sanded them down by hand to 1/16". For washers I made a bigger rod, about 5/8" long, drilled it out lengthwise, ran a 1/16" screw through it and chucked it in a drill, sanded it down to final size, and sliced it into washers with a hacksaw. Then finger sanded them down to final thickness. There is always a way.

Pins and washers cost barely anything, but who wants to fill a $.40 order? That's why they cost so much buying just a few. Go in with someone and buy a reasonable quantity. Or buy a bunch, use what you need, keep a couple sets worth, and sell the rest.

You are welcome. Everyone is welcome. Just tryin to do my part for all the help I have got over the years.
 
Thanks Slash, this was great teaching to me. It looks like you use a lot less water on the film than me.
I get my film and granite slab pretty darn wet, I notice the wetter it is the better the film sticks in place. Even on the top side, I guess it helps the surface tension even on the abrasive surface (as it rolls to the edges).
 
<snip>Pins and washers cost barely anything, but who wants to fill a $.40 order? That's why they cost so much buying just a few. Go in with someone and buy a reasonable quantity. Or buy a bunch, use what you need, keep a couple sets worth, and sell the rest.

You are welcome. Everyone is welcome. Just tryin to do my part for all the help I have got over the years.
I'm fairly sure the B&B member Firewalker sells em at $0.40 + shipping. I got the impression he'd do small orders (though to make shipping really worth it I'd guess more than one set would be advantageous).
 
RE:...
Pins and washers cost barely anything, but who wants to fill a $.40 order? That's why they cost so much buying just a few. Go in with someone and buy a reasonable quantity. Or buy a bunch, use what you need, keep a couple sets worth, and sell the rest...
I have them in the classifieds, buy 1 or 1000, $.20 each plus a first class stamp. See the link below...
 
Why raising burs? Isn't that a waste of steel?
Yeah it is if you don't need to set the bevel. You are wasting a tiny bit, you could say, even if you do need to set the bevel, IF YOU ARE CERTAIN, ABSOLUTELY CERTAIN, THROUGH SOME OTHER MEANS, THAT YOU HAVE SET A PERFECT END TO END BEVEL. The certainty is worth a micron of steel, to me. And I know I will never have to do it again to that razor. I rarely hone for others. Usually, I only hone my own razors, or junkers to give away or sell. I don't take in honing jobs for others. So I set the bevel once and never ever set it again. From there on, it is only maintenance honing.

The burr is proof that the bevel plane has been advanced all the way into the new edge line. It is relatively easy to detect, without a microscope. Once you learn to feel for it, hardly any burr is needed, so very little steel must be displaced. It is not the only way, but it is my usual way, of setting an initial bevel. You can certainly use another method, but mine is fast and dead certain. No gap is left anywhere on the edge without a good bevel. You can have your TNT or your TPT or your HHT or your FFT but none are as certain, quick, or foolproof as the simple burr method. The only thing that compares is inspection under a microscope. Of course, that isn't very fast, either. Hone a little, inspect some more, hone some more, inspect again... when you set a bevel and just figure you probably got it, then run through your progression, only to decide when you are done that the edge is not satisfactory from end to end and you need to start again from scratch, you may well be "wasting" more steel than if you had used the burr method in the first place.

I present my method not as the only method, but as the one I am proficient enough at to present, and the one that I prefer and that I believe, for several reasons, to be the best method. You can do it another way. I simply won't vouch for your results before the fact if you do it another way.
 
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