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Customizing my SIG P 365

OkieStubble

Dirty Donuts are so Good.
and you can be assured that I practice the safety not coming off until the weapon is coming up. worst case scenario is a shoot the sidewalk, which is why I maintain that a 3 pound trigger with no safety is a catastrophe waiting to happen

When I train in my home office with my beloved 1911 Springfield Range Officer Commander with an empty pistol and .45 ACP snap caps. I like to draw my 1911 from the holster, but will not flip off the thumb safety until the pistol comes up to chest height where it also meets my weak non firing hand.

At this point, the pistol is in both hands at my chest and the barrel is already pointing towards the intended target.

Then as I’m presenting the pistol by pushing it away from my chest towards the target and at arms length; I am simultaneously, switching the thumb safety off.

No need to worry about an inherent found ‘striking the sidewalk’ as you say; because I got my booger picker on the trigger too early, because I flipped the thumb safety off too early.

My thumb safety is switched off as the pistol moves from my chest forward towards the target. And then; and only then, will I place my finger on the trigger.

Training this way allows for? If the target then decides to run away or give up and I decide I don’t need to shoot? Taking my finger off the trigger and then as I’m returning the pistol to my chest I can simultaneously, flip the thumb safety back on safe.

This is just me. Your miles may vary. :)
 

nortac

"Can't Raise an Eyebrow"
and you can be assured that I practice the safety not coming off until the weapon is coming up. worst case scenario is a shoot the sidewalk, which is why I maintain that a 3 pound trigger with no safety is a catastrophe waiting to happen
The only way that happens is if your finger is on the trigger when it should not be. Even if you have a safety on, if you have your finger on the trigger too soon, you can have an ND as you flip the safety off. A mechanical safety can’t prevent every ND.
 

nortac

"Can't Raise an Eyebrow"
And just for the record, it's a 3 1/2 lb. trigger, not a 3 lb. trigger, there is a difference. Plus I can still swap around springs for a heavier trigger pull, if I deem it necessary. I'll continue with the 3.5 for the time being. And I'll continue to keep my finger off the trigger until it needs to be there!
 
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nortac

"Can't Raise an Eyebrow"
When I train in my home office with my beloved 1911 Springfield Range Officer Commander with an empty pistol and .45 ACP snap caps. I like to draw my 1911 from the holster, but will not flip off the thumb safety until the pistol comes up to chest height where it also meets my weak non firing hand.

At this point, the pistol is in both hands at my chest and the barrel is already pointing towards the intended target.

Then as I’m presenting the pistol by pushing it away from my chest towards the target and at arms length; I am simultaneously, switching the thumb safety off.

No need to worry about an inherent found ‘striking the sidewalk’ as you say; because I got my booger picker on the trigger too early, because I flipped the thumb safety off too early.

My thumb safety is switched off as the pistol moves from my chest forward towards the target. And then; and only then, will I place my finger on the trigger.

Training this way allows for? If the target then decides to run away or give up and I decide I don’t need to shoot? Taking my finger off the trigger and then as I’m returning the pistol to my chest I can simultaneously, flip the thumb safety back on safe.

This is just me. Your miles may vary. :)
I like your technique of manipulation of the manual safety on a 1911. That being said, Uncle Jeff taught to switch off the safety as you clear leather, and begin to take the slack of the trigger as you raise the gun to the target so as to achieve a "surprise break" immediately as the sights align with the target. With sufficient practice, this can be a safe procedure. Of course this was done with about a 4 lb., but crisp trigger pull on a 1911. Note, this was happening at speed when you have already made the decision to shoot! YMMV. Pistol craft techniques have continued to evolve, as have gun manipulations of many types of weapons. I continue to see innovations in how to run a shotgun. an AR or an AK that differ from "the way" many of us were taught back in the day.
 

OkieStubble

Dirty Donuts are so Good.
I like your technique of manipulation of the manual safety on a 1911. That being said, Uncle Jeff taught to switch off the safety as you clear leather, and begin to take the slack of the trigger as you raise the gun to the target so as to achieve a "surprise break" immediately as the sights align with the target. With sufficient practice, this can be a safe procedure. Of course this was done with about a 4 lb., but crisp trigger pull on a 1911. Note, this was happening at speed when you have already made the decision to shoot! YMMV. Pistol craft techniques have continued to evolve, as have gun manipulations of many types of weapons. I continue to see innovations in how to run a shotgun. an AR or an AK that differ from "the way" many of us were taught back in the day.
Col. Coop was the man for sure. Considering I will probably never put in the kind of time under a 1911 that he did, I’m sure, he probably didn’t switch out between different types and brands of pistols as I do. The Col. probably never carried a Glock.

In all respect for the Colonel, I’m probably safer sticking to what I’m doing. I have only owned and part time carry my 1911 for 3 years now. Maybe in the future if I move to carrying the 1911 more and become more proficient, I might give his draw technique some training time. :)
 

nortac

"Can't Raise an Eyebrow"
What’s the word on magguts +2 reliability and dependability?
Well the Magguts modified magazines have been problematic recently, with the slide locking back with rounds left in the magazine, some occasional feeding issues, the factory 12 rounders have been problem free. I probably need to disassemble the Magguts modified magazines and do a thorough cleaning to see if that makes any difference, but I've been too lazy to do so. I may just convert the mags back to factory configuration. I really wish SIG had not discontinued their 15 round mags for the P365. I don't really want to get the currently available 17 round magazines, but I may be forced to!
 

OkieStubble

Dirty Donuts are so Good.
Well the Magguts modified magazines have been problematic recently, with the slide locking back with rounds left in the magazine, some occasional feeding issues, the factory 12 rounders have been problem free. I probably need to disassemble the Magguts modified magazines and do a thorough cleaning to see if that makes any difference, but I've been too lazy to do so. I may just convert the mags back to factory configuration. I really wish SIG had not discontinued their 15 round mags for the P365. I don't really want to get the currently available 17 round magazines, but I may be forced to!

I have tried and used various magazine extensions over the years for the wife’s 43. I noticed if I had feeding troubles with any particular brand, it always seemed the trouble would come from where the spring inside the magazine made contact with the floor plate. The bottom of the spring would bind or get caught up on something at the bottom of the floor plate or extension and then affect the feeding capability. Trying to understand how the binding of the spring with the floor plate and extension affects the follower and feeding Is beyond me, I just know it’s frustrating when it happens.

I get why someone would desire a mag extension on a 6 round micro pistol, but when it came to my G43X, the size and weight with it’s 10 round magazine seemed to be a good mix of capacity vs size vs weight for me, so I haven’t picked up any of the 15 round Shield magazines for it.

I figure if I want it to be heavier with more capacity, I can also make it bigger and just step up to a bigger, heavier pistol.
 

nortac

"Can't Raise an Eyebrow"
I have tried and used various magazine extensions over the years for the wife’s 43. I noticed if I had feeding troubles with any particular brand, it always seemed the trouble would come from where the spring inside the magazine made contact with the floor plate. The bottom of the spring would bind or get caught up on something at the bottom of the floor plate or extension and then affect the feeding capability. Trying to understand how the binding of the spring with the floor plate and extension affects the follower and feeding Is beyond me, I just know it’s frustrating when it happens.

I get why someone would desire a mag extension on a 6 round micro pistol, but when it came to my G43X, the size and weight with it’s 10 round magazine seemed to be a good mix of capacity vs size vs weight for me, so I haven’t picked up any of the 15 round Shield magazines for it.

I figure if I want it to be heavier with more capacity, I can also make it bigger and just step up to a bigger, heavier pistol.

My primary reason for using an increased capacity magazine is purely related to our weekly competitions where 10 and 12 round magazines are at a disadvantage. I'm satisfied with the standard capacity mags for CCW. I'm already at a disadvantage shooting against others with full sized guns, I just wanted to reduce my "handicap" and still be able to get in the practice with my carry gun.
 
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