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Anyone else thought of re-hairing old brushes?

Hi everyone. I am in the process of getting member/vendor Rudy Vey to re-hair an old Kent that has sentimental value to me, and that got me thinking...

I'm sure at least some of you have considered trolling the thrift and antique stores and picking up an old/vintage brush that has a unique handle but the hairs are useless and having it re-haired to add to your collection. Besides having a unique brush to use, I'm thinking this could be an economical way to expand my collection.

I have surfed most of the forums, and haven't seen much traffic on this option at all. Am I missing something here, or is this a viable way to add to your collection for less money than going out and buying a new or used modern brush? I figure that the restoration would cost somewhere in the neighborhood of $40-60 (less if you want boar or badger, more for silvertip - my preference), plus the price of the old brush. ...And how much could that be? $5.00?

Sounds viable to me, but I'm new at this. What do you guys think - am I crazy and are there more economical ways to add to one's collection or am I on to something?
 
Yes, Rudy can fix you up at a reasonable price. Does good work and is reasonable. He fixed a brush for me. I think he can re hair old brushes. Another option is Shavemac in Germany; you can Google them. Bernd Blos is the name of the company. You can choose the brush you want put in the handle. It's more money than Rudy since you have to send it so far. Rudy is a great guy; I'd talk to him first.:biggrin:
 
I have about 10 vintage brushes that I will restore myself in the near future. I'm just waiting for a little spare time. The knots aren't that expensive.
 
I thought about doing it myself, but I destroyed the first one I tried to do so I've considered now not doing it. :blush:

Depending on if the handles don't cost too much I think it's a very viable way. Especially if you want unique brushes. :thumbsup:
 
I could see re-knotting my Dad's old Ever-Ready someday.

The hair is undoubtedly shorter than it was in the '60s (like all of us, come to think of it), but he sure loves the soft touch it lathers up with.

It seems like the handle would have to have sentimental value or look really cool for re-knotting to be worthwhile. I'm not too attached to the handles of any of my brushes; it's the knots that earn their keep.

Roger
 
I just messaged "The Golden Nib" ebay store guy about his badger knots about how to attach new knots to old brush handles. I asked how to measure for the replacement knot and how to attach it. Here's his reply:

QUOTE:
Yes, the knot size is appoximate, they tend to run 1.5mm smaller than the
quote size. But tend to be 1-2mm wider above the plug. I use 2 part epoxy
to glue my knots, either 5 or 20 minute set times.
END QUOTE.

How hard can it be?
 
I just messaged "The Golden Nib" ebay store guy about his badger knots about how to attach new knots to old brush handles. I asked how to measure for the replacement knot and how to attach it. Here's his reply:

QUOTE:
Yes, the knot size is appoximate, they tend to run 1.5mm smaller than the
quote size. But tend to be 1-2mm wider above the plug. I use 2 part epoxy
to glue my knots, either 5 or 20 minute set times.
END QUOTE.

How hard can it be?

I think the real problem lies not in putting the new knot IN, but rather in removing the old knot.
It can be tricky removing the knot, and a sufficient quantity of the old epoxy without messing up the handle.
 
I think the real problem lies not in putting the new knot IN, but rather in removing the old knot.
It can be tricky removing the knot, and a sufficient quantity of the old epoxy without messing up the handle.

This is exactly the problem! I just finished the restore of the brush from Wingnut who started this thread.
I think I put a total of three hours or so in. Firstly, because this is a brush with an extreme sentimental value, and secondly I try not to screw up a job or rushing it, and the end results would a poor restore.
First I took a picture of the brush, I documented the whole procedure, and if I get the permission of the owner, I will post pictures here.
The second step was to cut off all the residual hair as close as possible to the handle. Then I used a very sharp knife (Stanley box cutter type) and cut the rest of the hairs out, and most of the old glue. This has to be done very carefully, as one slip with the knife may gauge the handle or even cut a piece off. After I had removed all of the hair, I choose a Forstner drill bit that was just a tad smaller than the opening where the knot was. Now, the real problem is to hold the handle in a vise that is exactly centered under the bit, but also hold the handle firmly so it cannot spin. I have a special rubberized, cushioned pad that will do the trick. Carefully drill out the residual glue or at least get as much out what is in the handles hole. Then I used a mini sanding sleeve from a Dremel, but use it in my hand held drill - much better control. With this all the glue residue was now removed and also the inside walls of the handle hole, where the knot will be glued in, was roughed a bit up for a better glue surface.
Then came the part I feared actually the most. Using buffing wheels and buff the handle. This handle had some discoloration that occurred over the last 30 + years. I spend a long time here, using Tripoli and white diamond buffing compound. I had to go easy since I did not want to overheat this old plastic material. I was quite happy with the result. So far, I had spend some three hours. As the final step, I mixed up some 5 min epoxy and glued the knot in. The brush is drying now overnight and tomorrow it gets a final buff with wax and will be packed and shipped back to the owner. I hope he likes what he gets back.
As I said, if I get permission form him, I will post the pictures I took during this restore.
 
Thanks for putting a bug in my ear.

My hubby has just started wet shaving but that gives me an idea for a Christmas gift for him.

Years ago after both his parents passed away one of the things he inherited was his grandfathers shaving mug and brush. They are both silver (in color) i couldn't tell you what the metal actually is but they have tarnished (blackened) with age. Both are sitting in my china hutch right now. The brush has long since lost it's knot. And there is just a gaping hole that is clean and free of any glues etc. While the knot area is pretty small it might not be so good for shaving, it would be pretty neat to restore that brush even if it doesn't get used. And fill the mug with shaving soap for him to actually use.
 
Thanks for putting a bug in my ear.

My hubby has just started wet shaving but that gives me an idea for a Christmas gift for him.

Years ago after both his parents passed away one of the things he inherited was his grandfathers shaving mug and brush. They are both silver (in color) i couldn't tell you what the metal actually is but they have tarnished (blackened) with age. Both are sitting in my china hutch right now. The brush has long since lost it's knot. And there is just a gaping hole that is clean and free of any glues etc. While the knot area is pretty small it might not be so good for shaving, it would be pretty neat to restore that brush even if it doesn't get used. And fill the mug with shaving soap for him to actually use.

The UK knots that are offered by The Golden Nib are pretty small in their knot diameter, they may just fit right in this small hole.
 
Just an update on the ongoing restoration that Rudy's doing for me. He sent me pictures of the process as well as the final product, and all I can say is that it just about took my breath away! I NEVER thought that Rudy would be able to get the handle back to anywhere near where it now is... I won't even mention how great the new 24 mm silvertip knot from The Golden Nib looks (oops guess I just did!) I can speak volumes about how great it has been to work with Rudy on this restoration, but for now I'll give you the short version: If you're even thinking of having this done, Rudy's work is superb! As they say, "Just do it!"

As soon as I get the brush in my hot little hands, I'll post both a "before & after" as well as photos of the process (or if you prefer, Rudy, feel free to post them yourself, as I'm new to B&B and might not be able to figure it out easily). Thanks Again, Rudy - fantastic job!!
 
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it is very possible, I've done 3 already, and have several handles I've turned, but haven't gotten to the point of finishing them up...and sadly, may not get time for quite a while as it looks right now.

have a looksy in this thread
 
I just re-knoted my crappy VDH boar brush with a silvertip from The Golden Nib.
It's fabulous, and the total: ~$24
Much cheaper than even a C&E Best Badger Brush.
 
I have done 30-40 restores. most of which I sell on B&B. A great value and every one is "one of a kind". Now takes me about an hour of work from start to finish. The first few were several hours.

Vini Bobo has a posted a step by step>

http://badgerandblade.com/vb/showthread.php?t=58175&highlight=restored+brush

A restored Kent brush

http://badgerandblade.com/vb/showthread.php?t=98728&highlight=butterscotch

A couple of misc manufacturers:

http://badgerandblade.com/vb/showthread.php?t=95609&highlight=butterscotch
 
Hi Everyone, I thought you might like to get my first impressions of the restoration that I had Rudy Vey do on the brush mentioned in this (and another) thread. In a word: SUPERB! Rudy did an absolutely fantastic job on my old Kent. When I opened up the box, it literally almost took my breath away...:001_tt1:

If any of you are considering going this route with an old brush, I can unequivocally recommend Rudy to do the job. As you'll see when he posts the pictures of the restoration, the brush I got back looks new. No, that's wrong, it looks BETTER than new! Rudy's craftsmanship is exellent, he has been an absolute joy to work with, his communication about the work was above and beyond, and to top it all off, he even included a tube of ARKO citrus shave cream at no cost along with the brush!:w00t:

WOW!! If I'd known about B&B and Rudy before I would have done this years ago! Does it sound like I"m happy with the restoration?! You BET I am!! I won't write more now, as I'm anxious to take my "new" Kent/Vey for a test drive.
 
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