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Tuckmar Bartputzer Modell 1930

Item Description

Sometimes we, the wandering masses in the flea markets, get lucky, and it was on one bright Saturday morning about four years ago here in Ghent, Belgium that I happened upon this little gem of a straight razor being sold off by two fellows who were mostly flogging bits of French, Belgian and German army surplus. They had two of these razors there on the bench, of which I purchased this one (the better of the two) in what could be described as just two whiskers short of "mint" condition. I paid the equivelant of $5.00 and felt quite pleased about it at the time... in fact, I still do.

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This is a Tückmar Bartputzer Modell 1930 straight razor. I do not know if this razor actually dates back to 1930 or if it is of more recent vintage. Something tells me that this razor 'might' have been designed for supplying the military (?), but then again, perhaps it is just the circumstances of the purchase and my overactive imagination that suggest this to me. From the dimensions I would describe this as a 4/8 to 5/8 razor. The razor has black, plastic scales with three rivet points and the finish and assembly quality are quite good. The total weight is something in the neighborhood of 35 grams.

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Now, the most remarkable thing about this straight razor is that it is fully hollow ground, but completely unorthodox in the method of grinding. Usually, a razor blank is passed between a series of two mated grinding stones that are running vertically and they produce a curved hollowing with the grinding lines running from the back of the razor down to the cutting edge. The fabrication of this razor is completely different. In this case the blank has passed between two grinding wheels that are spinning in the horizontal plane, which have hollowed out the razor with the path of the grinding running from toe to heel of the razor. Although there is a very slight curve in the back of the razor, the grind path, itself, is essentially a straight line. My understanding of manufacturing processes tells me that this method of grinding would have enabled the factory to turn these out more quickly than would be the case for a razor blank being ground in the traditional manner.

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The last picture in the series of attached images serves quite well to illustrate the grind. Notice also that there is no widening of the cutting blade below the back of the razor as in a classic grind. Thus, there is no ground-in reinforcing web in the blade. This blade fairs in away from the back and then continues in a dead flat grind all the way down to the cutting edge. Although this blade is remarkably thin (I read it as 11/1000" using a machinist's micrometer), it is certainly stiff enough to do the job for which it was designed.

The performance of this razor has always been very good, even if not the best within my current stable of razors. Too, I tend to prefer a longer, heavier razor ( 6/8 ). Nevertheless, I do shave with this one every once in a while, and when I do, I never fail to appreciate the thought and ingenuity that went into its design.

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I think this a similar model to one I have by Tuckmar, called the Tuckmar 'Tee' (not a golf tee but rather the letter 'T') It is the same strange grind pattern as this one if not even more extreme - hence the 'Tee' name - from the end the blade looks like a letter 'T'. I've never seen any others like it.
Sometimes we, the wandering masses in the flea markets, get lucky, and it was on one bright Saturday morning about four years ago here in Ghent, Belgium that I happened upon this little gem of a straight razor being sold off by two fellows who were mostly flogging bits of French, Belgian and German army surplus. They had two of these razors there on the bench, of which I purchased this one (the better of the two) in what could be described as just two whiskers short of "mint" condition. I paid the equivelant of $5.00 and felt quite pleased about it at the time... in fact, I still do.

attachment.php


attachment.php


This is a Tückmar Bartputzer Modell 1930 straight razor. I do not know if this razor actually dates back to 1930 or if it is of more recent vintage. Something tells me that this razor 'might' have been designed for supplying the military (?), but then again, perhaps it is just the circumstances of the purchase and my overactive imagination that suggest this to me. From the dimensions I would describe this as a 4/8 to 5/8 razor. The razor has black, plastic scales with three rivet points and the finish and assembly quality are quite good. The total weight is something in the neighborhood of 35 grams.

attachment.php


Now, the most remarkable thing about this straight razor is that it is fully hollow ground, but completely unorthodox in the method of grinding. Usually, a razor blank is passed between a series of two mated grinding stones that are running vertically and they produce a curved hollowing with the grinding lines running from the back of the razor down to the cutting edge. The fabrication of this razor is completely different. In this case the blank has passed between two grinding wheels that are spinning in the horizontal plane, which have hollowed out the razor with the path of the grinding running from toe to heel of the razor. Although there is a very slight curve in the back of the razor, the grind path, itself, is essentially a straight line. My understanding of manufacturing processes tells me that this method of grinding would have enabled the factory to turn these out more quickly than would be the case for a razor blank being ground in the traditional manner.

attachment.php


The last picture in the series of attached images serves quite well to illustrate the grind. Notice also that there is no widening of the cutting blade below the back of the razor as in a classic grind. Thus, there is no ground-in reinforcing web in the blade. This blade fairs in away from the back and then continues in a dead flat grind all the way down to the cutting edge. Although this blade is remarkably thin (I read it as 11/1000" using a machinist's micrometer), it is certainly stiff enough to do the job for which it was designed.

The performance of this razor has always been very good, even if not the best within my current stable of razors. Too, I tend to prefer a longer, heavier razor ( 6/8 ). Nevertheless, I do shave with this one every once in a while, and when I do, I never fail to appreciate the thought and ingenuity that went into its design.
Price
5.00 star(s)
Lasting Edge
3.00 star(s)
Craftsmanship
4.00 star(s)
Easy to Sharpen
4.00 star(s)
Easy to Maintain
4.00 star(s)
Shaving Smoothness
3.00 star(s)

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ignatz
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