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The Codger Cabin

From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


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From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


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"Clews" is the very old spelling of "clues," and I thought it was mostly a British spelling. Perhaps this ad originally appeared in a British magazine. But then, "odors" would have been "odours." So maybe the ad agency was using the old spelling in line with the Englishness of "Bond Street."
 
"Clews" is the very old spelling of "clues," and I thought it was mostly a British spelling. Perhaps this ad originally appeared in a British magazine. But then, "odors" would have been "odours." So maybe the ad agency was using the old spelling in line with the Englishness of "Bond Street."
Philip Morris was a real person. His original shop was in London, on Bond Street.
 
"Clews" is the very old spelling of "clues," and I thought it was mostly a British spelling. Perhaps this ad originally appeared in a British magazine. But then, "odors" would have been "odours." So maybe the ad agency was using the old spelling in line with the Englishness of "Bond Street."
Yeah I was wondering what was up with 'clews'
 
From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


Here’s a beautiful, full-page, full-color splash for tobacco packed in Duraglas.

A few words about Duraglas, a legitimate advancement in glass packaging. And one the old codgers likely appreciated. From the Historic Glass Bottle Identification & Information Website (Historic Bottle Website - Homepage - https://sha.org/bottle/index.htm):

“Duraglas - This was the proprietary name for a process used by the Owens-Illinois Glass Company where the surface of the hot, just produced bottles, were sprayed on the body, shoulder, and neck (not base or the top of the finish) with a stannic chloride vapor that allowed the tin to bond to the outer surface and providing scratch resistance and durability to the bottles. (Information courtesy of Phil Perry, engineer with that company.) This process - and the embossed notation of it (in script) on the base of many Owens-Illinois products - began in 1940 and continued up until at least the mid-1950s, though the process is still in use today without the notation.”



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From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


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From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):



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I'll have to try some of the Briggs Match that's out there, just to say I've covered another of the OTCs (or their modern iterations). Of course, I may like it enough to buy it again.
 
From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


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From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


Marfak. One surprisingly versatile word of many meanings. It’s a noun. It’s a verb. It’s a sodium soap chassis grease that Texaco first offered in the early 1920s. And until recently, Marfak was also a lithium base grease available through Chevron in selected markets. It’s a product. And it was a proprietary service, too. But only when a Texaco (or Caltex) dealer performed it:

Let us Marfak your car.

But it won’t stop your dog from eating your hat. Perhaps “Marfak” has additional meanings when that happens.




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The unhappy guy with the puppy savaging his hat looks something like Robert Benchley -- who was famous on the silver screen by this time, and I think from ads for a brand of men's hats. Or maybe a little like Jerome Cowan.
 
Going through this thread made me looking for an OTC Burley in my neck of the woods - to no avail. 90% of pouches sold here are Danish Aromatics (Borkum Riff, Danske Club, etc.)

So I settled for a MacBaren Amphora (dark fired) Kentucky. I love Toscanelli cigars but never had a pipe with this leaf. More to follow once I have tasted it.
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Going through this thread made me looking for an OTC Burley in my neck of the woods - to no avail. 90% of pouches sold here are Danish Aromatics (Borkum Riff, Danske Club, etc.)

So I settled for a MacBaren Amphora (dark fired) Kentucky. I love Toscanelli cigars but never had a pipe with this leaf. More to follow once I have tasted it.
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You picked a deceptively good one. Amphora can be very tasty. Many happy puffs with it!

We are little spoiled here in the US, and take for granted that these old classics can be hard to find in other parts of the world.

Thank you for following along! I hope you find it a pleasant journey.
 
From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


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From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


He needs written instructions to make coffee. I’m betting he doesn’t eat prunes, either. Hopefully, he doesn’t confuse the coffee with the pipe tobacco.



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