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Test driving my shaving scuttle.

I imagine that this irritated you greatly.:001_smile
You have no idea. But I was so pissed off about the outage we had and the power company's lack of transparency for what was going on (unusual for them) that by the time it finally came back on I was in no mood to do anything but shower and head to bed early. I still have yet to shave today!
 
You have no idea. But I was so pissed off about the outage we had and the power company's lack of transparency for what was going on (unusual for them) that by the time it finally came back on I was in no mood to do anything but shower and head to bed early. I still have yet to shave today!
I feel your pain. We take electricity for granted daily. Then you lose it....different world.
 
Good morning.

Decided to give my shaving scuttle a test drive today. I placed the soap in the top of it and filled it with boiling water. I let it sit for a few minutes (with my shaving brush in the spout) to set the soap ‘set’ so it doesn’t slide about.

I started lathering with my hot brush and boy does it lather well! The lather was all hot, nice and creamy as I applied it to my face.

I did a ‘faux shave’ with my Parker 22R Interceptor razor (no blade) and it simply glided and it was that comfortable! Can’t wait to do an actual shave with it! I wish there was a fast forward button so my beard grows faster!

To conclude, I am extremely happy with my scuttle. I waited long enough for one and I am ever so pleased with it. I’m expecting it to pay for itself so I won’t have to keep buying creams so often. Can’t wait to try it with other soaps. In fact I am tempted to bin my rubbishy supermarket shaving gels (NOT to be confused with my GFT creams) to make room for some more Taylor soaps.

On a side note, can the scuttle also be used for lathering creams without the cream falling through the holes in the top section?

Jason.
Did you boils the water on the new induction stove?
 
I feel your pain. We take electricity for granted daily. Then you lose it....different world.
I think about those in regions where hurricanes or other major weather events can knock out power for days. We take so much of modern life as a given. Our outages are usually related to weather or road accidents but rarely last more than three hours and we usually know the cause pretty quickly with a good estimate of when power should be back on. Yesterday was a peek into how badly things would go for those of us on wells and full electric homes if a major disaster took place here and power was out for days. Fortunately, in the nearly 30 years we've lived here, there have only been 3-4 outages this long. But, as I get older with the desire to stay here until the end, every time we have an outage, I keep thinking of getting a major whole house generator system installed. But for about $15-20k, is it really worth it?
 
I live in a northern climate where it gets very cold in the winter time. My house uses all electric amenities, so when the power goes out, so does my heat. And for the occasional summer storm that knocks out power, will obviously lose the AC. We are plagued by severe winter storms generally, not as bad as hurricane 140MPH winds no. But we generally see wind gusts that can hit anywhere from 60MPH to 80MPH. These said winds have already damaged my house in multiple ways. For far too many years, I went through life without a generator, and suffered because of it.

(1) The longest power outage we suffered for was 1-week. No generator, no outdoor camping stove for cooking, no heating, food spoiled in fridge, worst week of my life, other then losing my parents that is.

(2) Second longest power outage was 3-days. Still no generator, but now I owned a Coleman 2-burner propane camping stove for emergencies to cook food, and make coffee on stove top percolator!

(3) Third longest power outage was 1-day. Still no generator, but by this point, was making plans to buy one, and not have to continue suffering by freezing in the winter cold gusty winds battering my house, with only a Coleman stove to make food.

(4) Fourth longest power outage was 17-hours. Now I have a Westinghouse Wgen 7500-9500 generator with automatic choke, electric start, remote start and shutdown, and a load of power! Now I can keep the fridge going, heat up meals in the microwave, run lights, and be able to run 2-1500 watt space heaters at the same exact time.

@CCS Many folks fall into the trap thinking that they need to buy a 10K whole house generator, and spend about 10-grand or more getting one installed. Those type of generators are only if you intend on running every single electrical major appliance you have, plus all amenities, at the same time. Its honestly a waste, and is not needed. You want to know a cheaper solution?

Buy the generator that I have, open frame portable 7500-9500, or you could step up to an 9500-1200 watt model if you'd like. That will cost you like only 1000 to 1500 dollars max. Then what you do is you hire an electric to not only install your generator hookup solution to the house and breaker. That size generator should be able to handle the load of most of your appliances, including the stove. Think about it, are you really going to be doing laundry during a power outage? Yeah, exactly, I don't see you running the dryer either, so it don't matter.

Now, regarding summer storms that could knock out power, you can get a soft easy start installed for your AC if you have one. Even these smaller portable generators can fire up any 10-ton+ AC unit, if there is a soft start capacitor installed in there, so its really not a big deal. By the time your done, your probably not spending more then 2000 to 3000 out the door with gen hookup, electrician costs, and easy starts all installed.

In my two cents, thats the smart money move right there.

Since getting my generator, I have now used it 3-times already for actual power generation. When I dont' need it to provide power for my home, I start it up and run it for 15 to 20 minutes every couple months. This is good for the engine to run, charges the SLA start battery, and keeps the exciter field coil charged in the generator. I have already done the first breakin oil change on it, and it has performed flawlessly for me.

PS: If you want to cut your costs down further, you could just buy a 4-way 120-V splitter cable that connects to the L-30 amp 220V outlet on the generator, which would provide you 4 plugin outlets off that alone for the 110-appliances, and then you will still have more standard L-20 amp on the generator to plugin more cords. Its called spaghetti cabling method, the old school way, it gets the job done as well, it doesn't look as pretty, can be more dangerous for those who don't know what they are doing, but it works, and again, will cost you less.
 
Good morning.

Decided to give my shaving scuttle a test drive today. I placed the soap in the top of it and filled it with boiling water. I let it sit for a few minutes (with my shaving brush in the spout) to set the soap ‘set’ so it doesn’t slide about.

I started lathering with my hot brush and boy does it lather well! The lather was all hot, nice and creamy as I applied it to my face.

I did a ‘faux shave’ with my Parker 22R Interceptor razor (no blade) and it simply glided and it was that comfortable! Can’t wait to do an actual shave with it! I wish there was a fast forward button so my beard grows faster!

To conclude, I am extremely happy with my scuttle. I waited long enough for one and I am ever so pleased with it. I’m expecting it to pay for itself so I won’t have to keep buying creams so often. Can’t wait to try it with other soaps. In fact I am tempted to bin my rubbishy supermarket shaving gels (NOT to be confused with my GFT creams) to make room for some more Taylor soaps.

On a side note, can the scuttle also be used for lathering creams without the cream falling through the holes in the top section?

Jason.

Very lovely report there @JasonJT . This is how a man pampers himself, because his spa, is in the shave den, and a man has to have a moment to himself once in awhile, yes sir! There is nothing like hot lather on ones face, during a cold winter day, warms your face up, feels awesome! And then message that hot lather in with a silver tipped badger brush, and you feel like a king!

Achievement Unlocked: Xen Moment Of The Shave

Did you see that recent video from GeoFatBoy on Youtube? I never thought I'd see the day when that man would use Barbissol. I know Sinatra Lennon uses it all the time but not GeoFatBoy. Well, his reports on his experience with said product, I can confirm, as I have had the same experience as him. It didn't provide him enough slickness, the razor was dragging, and I could even hear it dragging too, the feedback was real folks!

Suffice to say I really felt bad for him, cause when he brought the alum stick up to his face and neck, for the first time ever, he was getting stings everywhere. So the point I want to make is, life is better when you are using a proper traditional wet shaving soap or cream, applied via a shaving brush. And bonus points, if its hot lather applied via a scuttle woohoo! :thumbup:

I love that name of your Parker razor BTW, its the Interceptor. Why? Cause it will incerpect those pesky whisker fugatives, and bring them to justice, slice slice, off they go, flushed down the drain, where they belong. Heck yeah! 😁 I agree you waited long enough to pamper yourself. I am very happy for you! Now, if you don't mind, I'd like to share a pic of the scuttle I love.

Pampered Happiness From A Captains Choice Starry Night Scuttle!
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A shaving scuttle is a double-walled, ceramic bowl used to keep soap lather warm and ready for multiple passes. It is used by filling the bottom bowl with hot water and building a thick soap/cream lather in the upper bowl. This helps create a thick lather using both the heat from the water and any inner grooves in the bowl while also keeping it nice and warm - ready for re-application for any future passes. Some scuttles can also have a wide enough opening so that your shaving brush can also be kept warm and wet with the water in the bottom, however, this is less common. The normal material used in a scuttle is ceramic which has great thermal properties - they have a standard size of 3.5 inches wide and 2.5 inches deep but this can vary significantly based on the potter’s designs and style. You can also get full scuttle kits made up of three containers - a bowl to keep your brush wet, a scuttle for building and storing lather, and a third bowl for storing a soap puck and loading the brush.
 
A shaving scuttle is a double-walled, ceramic bowl used to keep soap lather warm and ready for multiple passes. It is used by filling the bottom bowl with hot water and building a thick soap/cream lather in the upper bowl. This helps create a thick lather using both the heat from the water and any inner grooves in the bowl while also keeping it nice and warm - ready for re-application for any future passes. Some scuttles can also have a wide enough opening so that your shaving brush can also be kept warm and wet with the water in the bottom, however, this is less common. The normal material used in a scuttle is ceramic which has great thermal properties - they have a standard size of 3.5 inches wide and 2.5 inches deep but this can vary significantly based on the potter’s designs and style. You can also get full scuttle kits made up of three containers - a bowl to keep your brush wet, a scuttle for building and storing lather, and a third bowl for storing a soap puck and loading the brush.

Looks like we got a new member. @Leelight66 just joined today at 9:10AM this morning. That means they are fresher then the groceries we buy in the store! 😁 Welcome welcome welcome to........ The most awesome place on the net, Badger & Blade forum! :thumbup: WOOHOO:thumbup:

I am SWCT, and I will be your enabler for today. And while welcoming you with great enthusiasm, I just wanted to say a quick note, on how detailed your description for what a scuttle is. Good job! I hope you enjoy the site!
 
A shaving scuttle is a double-walled, ceramic bowl used to keep soap lather warm and ready for multiple passes. It is used by filling the bottom bowl with hot water and building a thick soap/cream lather in the upper bowl. This helps create a thick lather using both the heat from the water and any inner grooves in the bowl while also keeping it nice and warm - ready for re-application for any future passes. Some scuttles can also have a wide enough opening so that your shaving brush can also be kept warm and wet with the water in the bottom, however, this is less common. The normal material used in a scuttle is ceramic which has great thermal properties - they have a standard size of 3.5 inches wide and 2.5 inches deep but this can vary significantly based on the potter’s designs and style. You can also get full scuttle kits made up of three containers - a bowl to keep your brush wet, a scuttle for building and storing lather, and a third bowl for storing a soap puck and loading the brush.
Welcome to B&B. I think that you are describing a conventional modern scuttle, the OP purchased a traditional scuttle as shown below which has a different construction and method of usage 👍

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