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Norton 4k questions

Ok, guys, a while back I got my hands on a set of hones to begin teaching myself how to use them. I'm living in Montana and wanted to pick up straight razor restoration as a winter time hobby. That being said, I picked up a Norton 1k/4k hone back in late spring of this year. I got a good deal on an 8k Spyderco from a fellow B&B'er, so I opted for the 1k/4k combination since I'm going to be doing some restoration work. Now that the weather has cooled back off and I'm not so busy with summer programming for work, I decided to pull out my hones and get them ready to use.

Ok, enough background. Here's my problem. I didn't lap the Norton when I got it; I didn't even inspect it closely until today. There are 3 divots in the surface and and two chips on the edge of one end of the hone, all of which I knew were there when I got it. I just didn't give them much thought. The chips I'm not too worried about. I don't have to use the hone all the way to the very end. The divots, on the other hand, are right in the surface I'll be using. This is all on the 4k side, by the way. The 1k side looks great.

Now my question: How should I handle this? I'm lapping it with 320 grit sand paper on a piece of glass. Can I just lap it down past the bottom of the divots? Or, should I try to contact the seller, woodcraft.com, if I remember correctly, and try to have them replace it for me? I have already begun lapping it, so that could affect whether or not they'll take it back.

Has anyone else run into this? I'm brand new to honing, so I don't really know what to expect new hones to look like.
 
I would try contacting woodcraft and seeing if they can do anything about it first. And if that fails, you can certainly just remove enough material to get to the bottom of the divets. Its the same principal as pit removal.
 
Before you start peeling back a ton of material, after a standard lapping will the edge even catch these "divots"???? how big are they???

If you end up having to keep it...
 
Before you start peeling back a ton of material, after a standard lapping will the edge even catch these "divots"???? how big are they???

If you end up having to keep it...
Well, I've already lapped it twice, they are still visible, and my fingernail will still catch them. They are roughly as big around as the eraser on a pencil, perhaps a little smaller. I'd post pictures of them, but my photography skills and equipment are fairly limited. I don't think my pics would help much.

I'm going to try to get in touch with woodcraft, assuming I can find proof that woodcraft is where I bought them, and go from there. I'm pretty sure I can remove enough material to make the hone usable. I'm just not really pleased that I would have to do that on a brand new hone.
 
well, your fingernail has a rather different geometry than the edge of a straight razor. you're back to glen's question - does the edge catch on them, if it does i would say there's something wrong with your honing.
 
well, your fingernail has a rather different geometry than the edge of a straight razor. you're back to glen's question - does the edge catch on them, if it does i would say there's something wrong with your honing.
Correct me if I'm wrong since I'm very inexperienced with honing, but if there is a spot where the blade doesn't touch the hone, would that not mean that there is a spot of the blade not being honed? That would result in some pretty uneven shaving edges, right?
 
Correct me if I'm wrong since I'm very inexperienced with honing, but if there is a spot where the blade doesn't touch the hone, would that not mean that there is a spot of the blade not being honed? That would result in some pretty uneven shaving edges, right?
No. Unless the hole runs the entire length of the hone and you hone using a straight stroke.

That said, they sound like rather large holes. a pencil eraser is a rather large item. Again, I suggest trying to return the stone or contacting Norton about it.
 
No. Unless the hole runs the entire length of the hone and you hone using a straight stroke.

That said, they sound like rather large holes. a pencil eraser is a rather large item. Again, I suggest trying to return the stone or contacting Norton about it.
Yeah. I'm going to certainly try going that route first. I'm also pretty confident I can just lap it until they're not there, should I not be able to return it.

I do see how it wouldn't necessarily affect the use of it, considering honing strokes aren't straight. I'd rather those little holes not be there, though, if only for peace of mind.
 
LOL yea !!!! brother join in with another OCD honer :001_tongu

If I kept it, I would have to get them out too... But they probably would not effect the honing....
 
LOL yea !!!! brother join in with another OCD honer :001_tongu

If I kept it, I would have to get them out too... But they probably would not effect the honing....
Glad to know I'm not the only one, though I still have a lot of learning to do.


Thanks for the input, all of you.
 
Correct me if I'm wrong since I'm very inexperienced with honing, but if there is a spot where the blade doesn't touch the hone,
Yes, this is correct.

would that not mean that there is a spot of the blade not being honed? That would result in some pretty uneven shaving edges, right?
No, doesn't mean that.

Some people use these for honing with no adverse effects:
http://theconsumerlink.com/DIAMONDMACHININGTECHNOLOGY/list/DWHET8/103
 
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