What's new

Just go get a Lamy 2000

tankerjohn

A little poofier than I prefer
I wish I had. The 2K is not the prettiest pen. I mean, its black, flat-end, and barrel tapered, so not offensive by any means - just not my favorite. Though being a pedigreed Bauhaus design, it’s pretty much the ideal for sleek, industrial style if you’re into that sort of thing. Previously, I couldn’t get on with the hooded nib. It just looked off. Not fountain pen-y enough. But now, a few months after giving in to the universal acclaim for this pen and getting one myself, I must say it’s a favorite. I can’t put it down. When I’m heading out the door, it’s the pen I reach for. It just feels so good to use, and the design has grown on me.

I especially like it for work. It isn’t pretentious or showy. Most people who glance at it casually probably think it’s a Uniball. The makrolon is tough enough for the daily rough and tumble in the office environment, and the brushed finished doesn’t scratch. It feels good in the hand too. It feels like a serious professional pen.

The best part is that the pen excels as a pure writer. My broad nib is bouncy and fun and has a nice stubby character. Of course, it holds a ton of ink. It’s the first pen I have owned that I really think of as an integrated writing instrument. I don’t want to repeat all the accolades others have written or said about this pen, but it’s all true. There’s a reason why certain bloggers – and I can think of two in particular - who own thousands of dollars’ worth of high-end special edition and artisan fountain pens rate the Lamy 2000 as their favorite.

I still like my other pens. I like the little quiver I’ve built up. I still think the Platinum 3776 has a better nib. The Pilot Custom 912 FA can do things the 2K can’t, and looks better to boot. My Pelikan M200s are fun and better pocket pens. My vintage pens are fun in their own way. But the 2K is probably the best all-rounder and has greatly tamed my wandering eye for new pens. New pens would only mean I could use the 2K less and that doesn’t sound very appealing at all.

If you don’t own one, you really should. Dirty enabling, I know! With both a 14K nib and (really good) piston-filler, they are a steal at <$200. Grab one now before inflation and German politics drive the price higher. Sure, it’s an investment. But good one, if you stick with this hobby and write a lot. I have a small drawer full of cheaper pens that I rarely use anymore that could have easily funded a 2K or two. You bet, the acquisition phase was fun while it lasted. But having arrived at a better place, I can honestly say I wish I’d just saved up for the Lamy 2000 instead. I admit I'm not very good at delayed gratification. But don't be like me. If you want a serious, high-quality workhorse pen that you'll buy once and cry once, just go get a Lamy 2000.
 
I agree. Great pen. I have two, and was seriously thinking about getting the stainless steel model, but the lack of an ink viewing window was a tipping point against it.
 
no. their nibs (Safari) are too big, their XF is a F in German/American, likely a M in Japanese...

I just have others I prefer more, and don't need one of these to supplant a current use pen. no, I haven't test driven one. don't want to.

so there. :letterk1: and this is said good naturedly, without contention intended.

<insert YMMV epistle/meme here>

thanks for the review though.
 

AimlessWanderer

Remember to forget me!
I do like the look, but it's way beyond my price range. In fact, it costs considerably more than all my other fountain pens put together... including the duplicates I keep as spares.

Glad to hear you're so happy with yours though :thumbup1:
 
The Lamy 2000 is my daily driver. I use it all the time at work. Writes well, good ink capacity and never skips a beat. The pop top is convenient for quick notes and I like the way that it flies under the radar. If you ever loose it you’d be bummed out but it’s easily to find a replacement.
 

Rhody

I'm a Lumberjack.
Amen. Another 2k fan here. I have the matching rollerball too. But lamy rollerball refills (and lack of third party equivalents) confound me.
ive had my2k fr about 15 years and haven’t used it for some time. I (tried) to ink it up a few months ago and actually forgot how the darn piston worked. I had to YouTube it. The pen does feel like it has a style all its own. Art in design.
 
I modify g2 refills to put in my L2k rollerball. It's been quit some time since I performed the modification, but iirc, I took the backend plastic piece off a Lamy refill, whittled it down a bit, took the corresponding piece off the g2 refill, and shoved the modified lamy piece down into the g2 refill. The pen is in my desk at work; if you're interested I could post a picture.
 

Rhody

I'm a Lumberjack.
I modify g2 refills to put in my L2k rollerball. It's been quit some time since I performed the modification, but iirc, I took the backend plastic piece off a Lamy refill, whittled it down a bit, took the corresponding piece off the g2 refill, and shoved the modified lamy piece down into the g2 refill. The pen is in my desk at work; if you're interested I could post a picture.
Interesting
Yes sure thanks
 
Interesting
Yes sure thanks
The refill on the bottom is a standard blue g2 refill. The one on the top is a standard blue Lamy M63 refill. The one in the middle is the modified g2 refill; for the modified g2, I removed the plastic part from a black Lamy m63 refill, shaved it down a bit, and shoved it in a g2 refill.
 

Attachments

  • 20210924_081943.jpg
    20210924_081943.jpg
    8.9 MB · Views: 16

Rhody

I'm a Lumberjack.
The refill on the bottom is a standard blue g2 refill. The one on the top is a standard blue Lamy M63 refill. The one in the middle is the modified g2 refill; for the modified g2, I removed the plastic part from a black Lamy m63 refill, shaved it down a bit, and shoved it in a g2 refill.
Thanks I’m going to try this
 

Doc4

Stumpy in cold weather
I have a 2000 mechanical pencil.

Vague memory of it being in the $50 range. It's a good pencil; I wanted a mechanical pencil that wasn't cheap and thin. Fits the bill. But ...

... the overall design and materials kind of leave me wanting more. So the thought of spending $200+ for a fountain pen in that configuration is not an appetizing thought. I have no doubt that it's a quality pen that writes well ... but this is a good example of how this is a YYMV personal preference subject.

The guys who absolutely love their 2000 pens aren't "wrong" ... they just have different tastes than me. That's cool.
 

tankerjohn

A little poofier than I prefer
no. their nibs (Safari) are too big, their XF is a F in German/American, likely a M in Japanese...
Yeah, this is probably the biggest downside of the 2000. (Well, that and the "sweet spot" that most don't notice but some find annoying.) First, I would say its endemic of many German pens, not just Lamy. Secondly, ink choice plays a big part here and using a drier ink will help keep the line as narrow as possible. Thirdly, you can always have the nib ground down to as fine as you want. That does, of course, add cost and diminish the overall value proposition. Though, I would say that if the nib width is the only thing turning someone off from the 2000, then it is definitely worth the extra cheddar to order it from a nibmeister who can grind and tune the nib to your liking.
I do like the look, but it's way beyond my price range. In fact, it costs considerably more than all my other fountain pens put together... including the duplicates I keep as spares.

Glad to hear you're so happy with yours though :thumbup1:
I used to think the same thing. But when I stopped buying every cheap pen that struck my fancy, I was amazed how much that allowed me to stretch my price range for one really good pen. Everyone's financial situation is different, and I would never advocate that someone spend more than they are comfortable spending on anything, let alone a pen. I'll just say I can think of worse ways to spend $150-200.
I have a 2000 mechanical pencil.

Vague memory of it being in the $50 range. It's a good pencil; I wanted a mechanical pencil that wasn't cheap and thin. Fits the bill. But ...

... the overall design and materials kind of leave me wanting more. So the thought of spending $200+ for a fountain pen in that configuration is not an appetizing thought. I have no doubt that it's a quality pen that writes well ... but this is a good example of how this is a YYMV personal preference subject.

The guys who absolutely love their 2000 pens aren't "wrong" ... they just have different tastes than me. That's cool.
The 2000 pencil looks great. The multipen too. Would make a nice set along with the FP, I think. I'm with you on the design. I had to really press the "I believe" button to order one. But now that's in my hand, I feel totally different. Kind of weird, I don't know if I'm describing it very well. It could just be that even though I'm not a big fan of Bauhaus or that sort of mid-century Euro esthetic, its just so well executed that I really like the look and feel of it in my hand. On the cost, I recall that the MSRP is right around or maybe just over $200 in the US, but they can easily be found for much less.

Thanks everyone for the comments! I appreciate the discussion whether you agree with me or not.
 
FYI a couple of times a year Endless Pens will offer the 2000 for at or around $100, which is pretty incredible actually. You can sometimes find them used for less even, give the hate side of the love/hate relationship people have for them. I neve bought one because I thought it might be physically too big for my taste, that and my wariness of yet another nib that isn't true to size.

As for design, it seemed that every time I asked (on that big forum) for suggestions for a modern styled pen, the 2000 came up by default. Well a 50+ year old pen based on a '30s design concept is hardly modern at all.

Anyway, I seem to have outgrown my aversion to uncircumcised pens and have discovered (for myself) the Parker 51. Go figure.
 

Rhody

I'm a Lumberjack.
Yeah, this is probably the biggest downside of the 2000. (Well, that and the "sweet spot" that most don't notice but some find annoying.) First, I would say its endemic of many German pens, not just Lamy. Secondly, ink choice plays a big part here and using a drier ink will help keep the line as narrow as possible. Thirdly, you can always have the nib ground down to as fine as you want. That does, of course, add cost and diminish the overall value proposition. Though, I would say that if the nib width is the only thing turning someone off from the 2000, then it is definitely worth the extra cheddar to order it from a nibmeister who can grind and tune the nib to your liking.

I used to think the same thing. But when I stopped buying every cheap pen that struck my fancy, I was amazed how much that allowed me to stretch my price range for one really good pen. Everyone's financial situation is different, and I would never advocate that someone spend more than they are comfortable spending on anything, let alone a pen. I'll just say I can think of worse ways to spend $150-200.

The 2000 pencil looks great. The multipen too. Would make a nice set along with the FP, I think. I'm with you on the design. I had to really press the "I believe" button to order one. But now that's in my hand, I feel totally different. Kind of weird, I don't know if I'm describing it very well. It could just be that even though I'm not a big fan of Bauhaus or that sort of mid-century Euro esthetic, its just so well executed that I really like the look and feel of it in my hand. On the cost, I recall that the MSRP is right around or maybe just over $200 in the US, but they can easily be found for much less.

Thanks everyone for the comments! I appreciate the discussion whether you agree with me or not.
The multi pen is very nice. I gave that. But it’s a fun you the refill block for me. First my one time local stationary store closed probably 10 years ago 🤔🤪
So my usual stop for new products and refills is gone. The little multi refills are expensive and just not easy for me to locate. Hence a block. The pencil is also cool and do reasonably priced I’d probably get it eventually even though I don’t use pencils that much.

I agree with your thoughts on pen buying but ymmv of course. I’ve wasted so
Much money on pens. I’m member of a big club. If I only saved up I could have gotten the grail but long term buying clashes with instant gratification.
 

tankerjohn

A little poofier than I prefer
FYI a couple of times a year Endless Pens will offer the 2000 for at or around $100, which is pretty incredible actually. You can sometimes find them used for less even, give the hate side of the love/hate relationship people have for them. I neve bought one because I thought it might be physically too big for my taste, that and my wariness of yet another nib that isn't true to size.

As for design, it seemed that every time I asked (on that big forum) for suggestions for a modern styled pen, the 2000 came up by default. Well a 50+ year old pen based on a '30s design concept is hardly modern at all.

Anyway, I seem to have outgrown my aversion to uncircumcised pens and have discovered (for myself) the Parker 51. Go figure.
:lol::lol::lol:uncircumcised pens...wow! Almost sprayed coffee all over my monitor. Reminds me of Mel Brooks. RIP Mel!

Anyway, yeah the Parker 51. I guess a lot of the things I was praising the 2000 for would also apply to the 51. Unassuming, professional, iconic design, and all that. Another nice "modern" design, if I do say so myself.
 

tankerjohn

A little poofier than I prefer
The multi pen is very nice. I gave that. But it’s a fun you the refill block for me. First my one time local stationary store closed probably 10 years ago 🤔🤪
So my usual stop for new products and refills is gone. The little multi refills are expensive and just not easy for me to locate. Hence a block. The pencil is also cool and do reasonably priced I’d probably get it eventually even though I don’t use pencils that much.

I agree with your thoughts on pen buying but ymmv of course. I’ve wasted so
Much money on pens. I’m member of a big club. If I only saved up I could have gotten the grail but long term buying clashes with instant gratification.
Sorry bro, I don't follow the "fun" part. There's a word missing, but I can't place what you mean. I get you on the expensive refills. I have a Platinum multipen that I dabble with. It pairs perfectly with a fountain pen. I use the FP for like 90% of my writing and grab the multi for those times need to mark a book or jot down a phone number or whatever. Since I don't use it often, especially the red ink or pencil, its a good system. But if I did, full size pens/pencils would make more sense.
 

Rhody

I'm a Lumberjack.
Sorry bro, I don't follow the "fun" part. There's a word missing, but I can't place what you mean. I get you on the expensive refills. I have a Platinum multipen that I dabble with. It pairs perfectly with a fountain pen. I use the FP for like 90% of my writing and grab the multi for those times need to mark a book or jot down a phone number or whatever. Since I don't use it often, especially the red ink or pencil, its a good system. But if I did, full size pens/pencils would make more sense.
Sort about that. I must have been drinking. I have the multi 2000 but the refills are tough to get and expensive. Also I really don’t use red and green all that much. When I write in red I think people in the office take it as I’m yelling. Lol. I’m the past I’ve stockpiled lamy refills but many dried out. I was pretty upset discovering a half a dozen ballpoint and roller refills dried out. I was trying to say the lamy refills present a block for me in terms of price and ease of availability etc. sorry to complain. I dig the 2000 design. Think about the pen designed in 1966 and it’s still in production.
 
Top Bottom