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Haggis! The Inside Story.

Old Hippie

Somewhere between 61 and dead
:lol: Our Scottish family wanted us to have a "real haggis" when we were there, so they got one and we practically had to fight the family to get any!

Never try to fly with a canned haggis. British TSA took mine away.

"What do you want with that?!"

"Bringing back for a friend."

"If you'd bring him that, you're no friend."


I bet they ate it, though.

Later made a "mock haggis" recipe with oatmeal, onions, and ... ground beef. :001_unsur


AA

You'd-a had some Spotted Dick or Toad in the Hole and they'd have let you through.

I once tried to leave Ottawa with two slabs of a rather rare miso that apparently one store in Ottawa can get. I was there for other reasons, so...

Mind you, this stuff looks exactly like some kinds of plastic explosive. The security guys blew their lids when they saw it, so I left the lineup and went up and checked my bag, then back through the line no problem.

As for your "mock" haggis, I'm not mocking. :) Some similar thing is in my list of recipes. I occasionally make it with ground mutton -- nice when I don't want liver but want something a little off the beaten path, culinarily.

O.H.
 
OH yes they do! Look, anyway. That "Spamineapple" over on @CzechCzar's thread on strange food is a great example.

I'll also submit Sweet-and-Sour Pork, mincemeat pie and pineapple on pizza as fruit-flavoured meat dishes.

O.H.
Only those that identify as a meatatarian will eat spam! Real meatatarians were brought up on Brontosaurus bones :sneaky2:

Sweet n sour pork is struck from the courtroom, the meat is still meat no matter what slop you put in. :sneaky2:

Meat pie, no vegetables ... thats a pasty


froot flavoured, he says, i say meat that looks like and tastes like froot :sneaky2:
 

luvmysuper

My elbows leak
Staff member
Only those that identify as a meatatarian will eat spam! Real meatatarians were brought up on Brontosaurus bones :sneaky2:

Sweet n sour pork is struck from the courtroom, the meat is still meat no matter what slop you put in. :sneaky2:

Meat pie, no vegetables ... thats a pasty


froot flavoured, he says, i say meat that looks like and tastes like froot :sneaky2:
The US version (1974)

 
A couple of recipes to whet the appetite. They’re real taste bud ticklers, and an illustration shows a paunch and pluck being boiled in a pot; with the windpipe hanging over the edge to drain off impurities. 😋 Im feeling hungry already.

🥚eyroun is heggs🥚
 

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A couple of recipes to whet the appetite. They’re real taste bud ticklers, and an illustration shows a paunch and pluck being boiled in a pot; with the windpipe hanging over the edge to drain off impurities. 😋

Wow, I can see nothing goes to waste. Good to know.
 
Nothing was wasted when I was growing up, either. I’ve had a lifelong addiction to Bubble and Squeak and Bread and Butter Pudding, among many others.
 

Old Hippie

Somewhere between 61 and dead
🥚eyroun is heggs🥚

Man, straight outta Anglo-Saxon. There's a story about a couple of Norman guys traveling in the English countryside, stopping at a farmhouse and asking the wife to cook them some eggs. Her reply was that she "didn't speak French." Had they known to ask for "ayren" they'd had some lunch. (The implication was the word they used was "eggs" rather than "oeuf")

From this distance in time and space, it looks like there was a lot of ferment in the English language. As Middle English drifted away from Anglo-Saxon, it also looks like Scots kinda froze about halfway between Anglo-Saxon and Middle English.

These things fascinate me. :)

O.H.
 

Old Hippie

Somewhere between 61 and dead
So you know I'm not all wind, here's some "Haggisish" for your visual entertainment...

IMG_0783[1].JPG

For those who are just encountering the nomenclature :) the haggis is the stuff on the right. "Bowl haggis" which avoids multiple frustrations beginning with even finding a blind stump. Another nomenclature kerfuffle (say that three times fast) concerns the stuff on the left. Technically it's clapshot. Many people would call it Neeps An' Tatties but according to my haggis guru they'd be wrong in this case. The difference? Neeps An' Tatties is...well...turnips and potatoes. Clapshot also includes onions.

The haggis: toasted stone-ground oats, mutton, lots of onion, salt, pepper, thyme, rosemary and mace. Well moistened with broth and then a bit more fat worked in. Steamed for 3 hours. The clapshot: aside from the obvious, some butter, salt and pepper and a dose of heavy cream.

O.H.
 
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