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Traditional Tejano Carne Guisada

I may have lived in South Dakota for the past 14 years but I was born and raised in Texas and lived there a good portion of my adult life as well. Sometimes I miss food that I used to be able to pick up in Taquerias back in Texas and off I go searching the world wide web for a recipe that will satisfy my cravings. Usually, I am not too pleased with the way the recipes come out but I found this one a couple of years ago and it is a winner! Like many Mexican recipes it uses a cheap cut of meat, beef stew meat to be correct. We often make this recipe just as it's listed but we needed to stretch a meal one time and used equal parts meat and cubed potatoes (added during the last hour) and it came out great. It is on the menu regularly at my house. It isn't spicy hot so you can eat it mild or add your favorite hot sauce. If you are fortunate enough to have access to fresh Hatch Chiles then by all means, put some in! We haven't tried making the crock pot version but I am sure it works well.

Here is the link Traditional Tejano Carne Guisada

Here is the recipe but I urge you to check out the link. There's lots of background info.

Traditional Tejano Carne Guisada (Braised Beef for Tacos)
Servings: 6 Servings

Prep Time: 10 mins
Cook Time: 2 hrs 30 mins
Total Time: 2 hrs 40 mins
This is an easy Tejano version of the classic Carne Guisada (Stewed Beef), a recipe that has been passed down for several generations. Made on the stove or in the slow cooker, this meat is perfect for tacos, burrito bowls, salad, etc. Or pick it all out of the pot with your fingers, I'm not gonna judge.
Ingredients
  • salt and pepper
  • oil
  • 2-3 pounds cheap steak or roast, chopped into bite size pieces*
  • 1 large onion, chopped well
  • 3 cups water
  • 8 ounces tomato sauce
  • 2 tablespoons garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons beef bullion, good quality
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
Instructions
Stovetop Instructions:
  • Heat a large, high-sided skillet (or a wide-bottomed pot), over medium high heat.
  • Salt and pepper the beef chunks.
  • Add about a tablespoon of oil to the pan and swirl. It should start to shimmer if the pan is hot enough.
  • Add 1/3 of the seasoned meat to the pan. Place the pieces of meat so that they are not touching each other (You don't want them to steam--see photos). Turn the pieces with tongs to brown all sides. Remove to a plate and repeat 2 more batches, adding more oil as necessary.
  • Remove the final batch of meat, then add the onions to the pan, adding more oil first if there is none left.
  • Saute the onions over medium heat for 5-8 minutes, or until mostly cooked through. Do your best to scrape up the browned bits.
  • Return the meat to the pan. Add the water, tomato sauce, garlic powder, salt**, beef bullion, pepper, and cumin.
  • Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce to a low simmer. You want there to be some movement. If the mixture is completely still, turn it up a little. I had my burner set just below medium.
  • Simmer for 2-3 hours, or until the meat is tender and the gravy has thickened. Stir occasionally.
  • To serve authentically, put the meat, some rice, cheese, and guacamole in a warm flour tortilla.
  • It's important to note that this is not a shredded beef recipe; "Carne Guisada" literally means "Stewed Beef" so you want it to be just like beef stew, but without any veggies.
Slow Cooker Instructions:
  • Don't add 3 cups of water! Read on:
  • Brown the meat and saute the onion as instructed above. Add the meat and onion to a crock pot. In a glass measuring bowl, measure out 1/4 cup HOT water. Add the beef bouillon and dissolve. Add the tomato sauce, garlic powder, salt**, pepper, and cumin to the measuring cup. Stir and combine, then pour over the meat in the crock pot, stirring to coat.
  • Cook on low for 6-7 hours.
  • Remove the lid for the last half hour of cook time, and turn the heat up to high. This is to burn off some of the excess liquid. If it's at a consistency you like, you can skip that step.
  • It's important to note that this is not a shredded beef recipe; "Carne Guisada" literally means "Stewed Beef" so you want it to be just like beef stew, but without any veggies.
Notes
*I always buy the pre-chopped stew meat that they have ready to go at most grocery stores.

**If you salted the meat liberally in the first step, then you will need more like 1/2 teaspoon. Start low, you can always add more later.

Source: my sister Laura’s husband Adam’s paternal grandmother, who came from a long line of Tejanos.
 
Carne Guisada is probably the best stew on the face of our planet. I think your recipe is right down the line with tradition. I also posted a Recipe as well. They are somewhat similar. Great job South Dakota guy. I’ll give your recipe a shot.
It is awesome. Our recipes are pretty similar but yours has more ingredients so the flavor is probably a bit better. We always use precut stew meat, usually Sam's Club has a 3 or 4 pound packs available. I was wondering if anyone on the forum had heard of Carne Guisada. It's not something that I have ever seen outside of Texas.
 
It is awesome. Our recipes are pretty similar but yours has more ingredients so the flavor is probably a bit better. We always use precut stew meat, usually Sam's Club has a 3 or 4 pound packs available. I was wondering if anyone on the forum had heard of Carne Guisada. It's not something that I have ever seen outside of Texas.
Oh yeah there’s a bunch of members around here that know what CG is. Even in yankee country. The problem is they want to put ketchup on everything.
 
Oh yeah there’s a bunch of members around here that know what CG is. Even in yankee country. The problem is they want to put ketchup on everything.
Yeah I have a stepson that thinks ketchup is a food group. We need to compare King Ranch Chicken recipes sometime. Up where I live now near the Minnesota border, it is casserole country. Except they call it “hot dish” here. My wife won the hot dish cooking competition at work a while back with her recipe. Of course it really stood out against the usual tater tot bland casseroles that pass for food here.
 
Yeah I have a stepson that thinks ketchup is a food group. We need to compare King Ranch Chicken recipes sometime. Up where I live now near the Minnesota border, it is casserole country. Except they call it “hot dish” here. My wife won the hot dish cooking competition at work a while back with her recipe. Of course it really stood out against the usual tater tot bland casseroles that pass for food here.
OK I’m going to send you a casserole “hot dish” recipe. It is a green chili hominy casserole dish with cheese and everything. Give me a couple days and I’ll shoot you a copy of my worn out recipe. In fact I’m making it this weekend.
 
Thread hijack.
Hatch chiles. We like to go to New Mexico. I went to UNM, hot air balloon fiesta etc.
New Mexico loves Hatch chiles. I thought/believe they are grown along the Rio Grande?
Am I mistaken?
Great events- going to farmer’s market where they are roasting Hatch peppers there.👍👍👍👍😃
 
Thread hijack.
Hatch chiles. We like to go to New Mexico. I went to UNM, hot air balloon fiesta etc.
New Mexico loves Hatch chiles. I thought/believe they are grown along the Rio Grande?
Am I mistaken?
Great events- going to farmer’s market where they are roasting Hatch peppers there.👍👍👍👍😃
I don’t know that Hatch chilies are a type so much as they are a brand. I have an ex girlfriend who was from Laramie Wyoming and we used to go visit her family in the early fall so we could visit the Denver area and buy the chiles from the roadside stands. I love the food in New Mexico and how they put green chilies in everything.
 
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