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Foolproof Lather Method (TM) - any soap - any brush

Lefonque

Even more clueless than you
A really good thread. As someone who enjoys lathering up I am enjoying reading tutorial and responses. I was taught to lather by my grandmother. Her stepdad had a barber shop in London back in the early 1900s. As a young girl it was her job to prepare lather pots every day. She showed me how to lather so that I would not pick up what she called my Grandfather’s bad habits. It has stood me in good stead. Even to this day when I prepare my lather I think of her.
 
I was taught to lather by my grandmother. Her stepdad had a barber shop in London back in the early 1900s. As a young girl it was her job to prepare lather pots every day. She showed me how to lather so that I would not pick up what she called my Grandfather’s bad habits. It has stood me in good stead. Even to this day when I prepare my lather I think of her.
This sounds like quite the story and potentially a great starting point for another how to lather tutorial thread! The “Lefonque London Lather Pot Method” perhaps…

@JCinPA thanks for a great tutorial. Very nicely written
 

JCinPA

The Lather Maestro
School is in session! Part 2 is up. LOVE the Rodney Dangerfield gif! :lol:

 
A really good thread. As someone who enjoys lathering up I am enjoying reading tutorial and responses. I was taught to lather by my grandmother. Her stepdad had a barber shop in London back in the early 1900s. As a young girl it was her job to prepare lather pots every day. She showed me how to lather so that I would not pick up what she called my Grandfather’s bad habits. It has stood me in good stead. Even to this day when I prepare my lather I think of her.
What a great story @Lefonque 😍

So, what's the secret method? How did she do it?
 
This is exactly what I do with every lather and have been doing for years.
The method, as far as I know, was actually first explained in detail by a guy on a different forum who went by the handle 'Merkur man.' For the life of me i can't remember what his real name was. He was a dentist.... I remember that.
Anyway, his lathers always looked the best in his posts, so people asked him how he did it, and his explanation was precisely the same as the tutorial in this thread.
I was already using a substantially similar method at the time. I recommended it many times on this forum, especially to people who were struggling with getting a good lather out of Mystic Water, which was one of my favorite soaps. In fact, the verbiage on the Mystic Water website about how to lather the soap is largely mine, taken from one of my posts on this forum (with my permission).

I would add just a couple of thoughts. If you want your lather to be more dense and less airy, slow down your brush movements and use circular motions. Make sure each new addition of water is fully incorporated before adding more water.
On the other hand if you are using one of the famously low structure soaps and you would like to add a bit more volume (read 'air') to your lather, consider speeding up the brush motions and doing more up and down motions like a chef uses when making mayo from scratch with a whisk.

In my opinion people generally make three mistakes most commonly:
1) they don't load enough soap into the brush,
2) they swirl way too quickly and too vigorously, which introduces too much air into the lather too quickly, and
3) they don't take enough time. Most soaps will make a protolather that looks pretty darned good in about half the time it really requires to get the best lather the soap is capable of delivering.
 

Marco

B&B's Man in Italy
School is in session! Part 2 is up. LOVE the Rodney Dangerfield gif! :lol:

Well, well, well... What do I see there? A dashing Gentleman in a new grey suit... He is said to be a diplomatic, a new Ambassador to be precise. And he is said to be a great friend of the Italian Ambassador. :wink2:

@JCinPA Dear John, my warmest welcome to the B&B Team!! :thumbup1:
 
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