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It's been a while since I shaved last time due to my varicela infection and today I finally made it :) 9th day of beard growth. I was kinda excited and in anticipation - what to use, how to attack 9 days beard? Fortunatelly I didn't have much of choice (that's why my RAD was kicking hard those days):
  1. Wilkinson Classic (black one) - for me agressive enough, but held blade almost horizontal, not very comfortable
  2. Muhle R89 - perfect balance in comfort and smoothness (but I use it daily and just a couple times made it on 5 days growth)
  3. Fatip Piccolo OC - little beast that would eat a much heavier growth
I've opted for the R89 (image attached), paired with Wilkinson Black blade on it's #1 use, Proraso Sandalwood and Razorock BC Silvertip.

Must admit that I was thinking a lot of all the "wet-shaving hype" (spoiler alert: I might state very unpopular opinion but it's just my share of thoughts and would like to hear your opinion), all the variety of razors being available (yet vast majority falls in 0.68mm, 0.84mm blade gap), brushes (OK, I'm guilty on this one, but I guess one brush of a kind - boar, synth, badger is just fine), all the different razor-materials (SS, brass, zamak, bronze, aluminium, plastic etc.) and wonder - how did we get up here? Pure consumerism? Technological advantages? I still recall my grandfathers using no-name DE razors even without safety bar... my father still uses his own East-European brass razor... so do we really need all those new fancy stuff? Are there any real advantage, or at some point - it's just a collection thingy, hobby outside of the scope of daily routine and pure need to just "look presentable"?

While I lathered up, I was still in this mode - did I choose right razor? Should I have ordered another "beast" for days like this with double-digit beard growth but I still enjoyed my small-step improvement seen in Razorock BC brush. Nevertheless - I just started with R89, got my angle right (after 3 years I do it blind) and surprisingly - beard just started to fall off! OK, it's not uncommon - the longer the whiskers the more water they'll soak, easier to lather, easier to absorb lather -> hence easier to be cut, right? I finished standard WTG pass and performed cheek's XTG pass only. Needless to say - 9/10 (if BBS is 10). I was bit surprised, really.

R89 is a "mild" razor - but when referenced at reviews it almost sound like "not good enough", "beginners only", "short stubble shaver". Why we think about razors as "agressive = efficient", "mild - will require 12 passes and 2hr shave session"? Afterall it's the blade which performs cutting, everything else is just another piece of a puzzle. How well prepared is your face, how much of a blade wiggle is allowed by razor-head clamping, how nimble is the razor to swipe around face and maintain the ideal angle. I'd say that for my beard - whenever I though I'd need a "more agression" it ended up that my beard required incremental reduction to keep it comfortable, specially with thicker growth. With right soap-water ratio neither of my razors clogged with stubble, rinsed just as usual. I do sorry a little bit for not using Piccolo but it's already somewhat established as an efficient razor, so it wouldn't be such controversy for it as much as for a "mild razor".

Are we perhaps being pulled into the rabbit hole to acquire more and more razors, while mastering one (like our elders used to do) could easily achieve same result? Are we chasing the result, or we're just feeling adventurous about the journey? :) Are we just recreating that feel when we discovered the joy in wet-shaving, when we stopped having ingrown hairs and irritations of any kind? But - what if we don't achieve that any more? What if we're already at that point when further improvements would not be so remarkable (like when transition from cartridge to R/DE89 i.e.) and we end up dissapointed instead (i.e. "my 100$ razor shaves just a tad bit better than my 30$ one"). Not to mention that I could easily buy another R89 and R41 for the price of an average SS razor (+ some soap probably)

I was browsing for some razor in SS range, just for fun and I noticed that many of SS razors do have a bunch of complains but when looked at brass/zamak area of 20-30$ range there are almost >90% positive feedback :D Crazy, isn't it? I'm not saying that it's wrong to acquire another razor, or to have "each of it's kind", I'm quite pro-purchasing better creams/soaps/brushes as my mid-range soaps outlasted some of the cheaper ones, becoming super-economical (1$ soap would last 1 month, while 5$ soap is used for 8 months and still not a 5mm spent from tub), not to mention face-feel and skin care included when soaps with natural ingredient are used. So yeah, I'm supporting some investments in shaving gear, but as said - there are lot's of soap I'd use and I'm not even halfway through my current ones :) So what would happen with the razors? If zamak, brass razors would last us for a lifetime and already provide a great shave - do we need 3x more in price for a 5% improvement in shave feel?

Perhaps I've just did overthinking due to my overload of free time and too much reviews watched in a short time, but still - I couldn't resist from asking the question here. I'm not quite convinced by established YT-shavers, who use premium razors/soaps/brushes, worth of hundreds of $ yet still need 3-4 passes + touchups to shave nicely? Some of them even use lather so thick that it cracks on their face and later on suffer from tremendous aftershave-burn(!?) How's then top-tier products help in quality shaves anyhow :)

I'm like about 50$ in shave-equipment, enjoing remarkable shaves daily (and weekly) see no issues with OC or SB, and yet - I want something "new, durable, to last me a lifetime" you know, just a RAD thing I guess... But - is it really needed? Is it ok just to stop and enjoy the current place of the race, to admit - ok this is it, this works for me?

Please let me know what razor/equipment worked similar for you:
  • cost low-mid money
  • gave you expected results you could live with
  • make you feel like you're ending your quest for a perfect shave
  • something that you could settle on and never* buy anything more (unless needed or at super discount :D)
  • what is your "I think I went over the line with this..." thing? (diminishing return)
Thanks, and sorry for long post.
 

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I own 6 razors now, and none of them were cheap.

Feather AS-D2
Rex Ambassador
Merkur Futur
Timeless TI95
Gillette Fatboy
Henson AL13

Its IMO, that I have fallen down the rabbit hole far enough when it comes to razors. I never really considered restraint a word in my vocabulary. But at least when it comes to razors, I have to now take it more seriously. Now, software, thats a whole different deal, I have no problem buying more soaps and whatnot, but the buying of razors has to stop. lol
 
Most of the equipment mentioned on this forum is excellent…and more than enough to be satisfied with for the long term. My advice to anyone looking for a great set-up is to do it old-school:

Try an old Gillette razor, 2-3 types blades, 1 decent soap and 1 cream, and 1 good-quality brush. Then stop buying stuff and shave for a year or so with what you’ve got. If you find you’re really dissatisfied with anything swap it out for something new. But if you’re getting good shaves consistently then just shave and forget about buying equipment. Just replace the disposables.
 
I own 6 razors now, and none of them were cheap.

Feather AS-D2
Rex Ambassador
Merkur Futur
Timeless TI95
Gillette Fatboy
Henson AL13

Its IMO, that I have fallen down the rabbit hole far enough when it comes to razors. I never really considered restraint a word in my vocabulary. But at least when it comes to razors, I have to now take it more seriously. Now, software, thats a whole different deal, I have no problem buying more soaps and whatnot, but the buying of razors has to stop. lol
Years ago, when I believed buying shave stuff was cool, I decided to count the number of bathroom accouterments my wife had and I had. (Bottles, razors, soaps, whatever) When I realized my collection had exceeded 15% of hers I knew there was something seriously wrong with me and stopped buying more.
 
I've owned these razors so far (in chronological order):

1. A cheap super aggressive Rimei
2. Gillette Super Adjustable
3. Feather Popular
4. Henson AL13 <--diminishing returns
5. Gillette Super Blue <--gave me exactly what I needed at a low price
6. Gillette Tech

I never went down the soap rabbit hole. I just buy some when I run out and it doesn't need to be anything fancy. They all work pretty well for me.
 

luvmysuper

My Elbows Leak
Do what you want to do to keep it fun and interesting.
No one can tell anyone else that they have too much stuff, or not enough stuff.
All they can say is someone has more or less than THEY want.
Who cares what you spend your funds on. It's your money, do with it as you wish.
Now, if the kids don't have shoes or a bill is going unpaid so you can get that new Titanium and Stainless Steel Magnum Full Moon Brush handle with High Mountain Water Badger belly hair - then maybe you've got a problem.
 
I started DE shaving in February of 2022. I have to credit the Henson ad I saw on YouTube which piqued my curiosity. I started more modestly with a Van Der Hagen and have small collection of razors (listed in approximate order of acquisition):
  1. Van Der Hagen short handle (Weishi 9306) - Nice mild 1960s-era Gillette Super Speed clone; good for learning
  2. Baili BR179 (Vikings Blade Chieftain clone) - Decent, slightly more aggressive than the VDH but with a larger head
  3. Col. Conk "Major" - Heavyweight razor, medium-aggressive
  4. Edwin Jagger (EJ) DE89 - Attractive chrome plating on very good mild-to-medium razor
  5. Merkur 34C - Good all-around mild-to-medium razor
  6. Parker 87R - Gillette Aristocrat lookalike; more aggressive than the VDH and Super Speed but also more efficient
  7. Razorock Lupo (aluminum) - Great razor that I paired with a stainless handle
  8. Gillette Super Speed - 1971 black handle for nostalgia; shave-wise is indistinguishable (to me) from the VDH
  9. Maggard V3M ("mild") - Chrome handle and Tech clone head
  10. Maggard V3 ("medium") - Matte finish; head similar to the Edwin Jagger DE89/Mühle R89, but slightly more aggressive
  11. West Coast Shaving razor - Inexpensive EJ DE89 clone; decent razor
  12. Blackland Dart - Obtained this razor in a trade with another B&B member
  13. The Winning Razor - The Wet Shaving Club's mild but very efficient stainless steel razor
  14. Gillette Tech - 1940s era; received from @Chef455 in a very generous PIF
  15. (In route) Razorock Lupo .72 - This is a stainless steel razor that will likely replace the aluminum Lupo
Most of these acquisitions were because I was learning and wanted to try different razors without breaking the bank (my budget limit is around $50 USD per razor). The most expensive are the stainless Lupo (purchased at a discount from a fellow B&B member), which currently retails for $70, and the Winning, which currently retails for $55 (I got a 10% discount for Father's Day, which brought the price down to $49.50). I got the Merkur 34C for about $32, the DE 89 from another fellow B&B member at a discount, the aluminum Lupo for $30, the Maggard medium for about $25, and the rest were all less than $20.

[Regarding the Henson, which initially piqued my interest: I'm sure I would like how it shaves, but IMO it's expensive for an aluminum razor and also has (again, IMO) an most unfortunately unattractive handle design. The Winning has a similar head design, is steel, is heaver, looks "cooler," and is, surprisingly, less expensive.]

So I guess I would say that, in my limited experience, I have learned that I can get extremely good shaves from relatively inexpensive razors. I don't need all of them and will likely be selling or giving some of them away. I know that some swear by many more expensive razors, but I have decided at this point that my limit is about $50/razor. (Of course, this is just my personal limit. No judgment from me for those who have no problem buying $200+ razors if they are able!)
 
Is it like that phrase about 80/20% maybe? Something like you spend x to get 80%, many items to choose from. You pay 2x to get 90%, less items to choose from. The last 5% ends up being 10x and only a hand full of options are available.

I remember the experience when I finally got my Timeless Ti95 figured out, and my first truly sharp straight razor, and every time I re-visit it I have the same feeling of amazement and confidence. The straight may go out of sharpness, but the Timeless only takes a fresh blade to wow me. I think you really need to be in the top 10% to get this kind of experience and I concede that it might be dulled by having many top tier razors. At only one rung below a Wolfman, I have some realistic idea what the experience would be like. Yet I have no desire to pay double again to confirm that, we all have our limits. Some try everything, some try to choose carefully with each purchase. Unfortunately, you simply aren't going to get a razor that shaves like a Timeless for $50. Or $100 for that matter, they are actually an incredible value. There is incremental, then there is large steps. But if it gives you no subjective value then it doesn't matter how expensive or cheap it is. Sometimes cheap things can be a thrill if you master them, sometimes there is no more improvement to be found.
 
It's been a while since I shaved last time due to my varicela infection and today I finally made it :) 9th day of beard growth. I was kinda excited and in anticipation - what to use, how to attack 9 days beard? Fortunatelly I didn't have much of choice (that's why my RAD was kicking hard those days):
  1. Wilkinson Classic (black one) - for me agressive enough, but held blade almost horizontal, not very comfortable
  2. Muhle R89 - perfect balance in comfort and smoothness (but I use it daily and just a couple times made it on 5 days growth)
  3. Fatip Piccolo OC - little beast that would eat a much heavier growth
I've opted for the R89 (image attached), paired with Wilkinson Black blade on it's #1 use, Proraso Sandalwood and Razorock BC Silvertip.

Must admit that I was thinking a lot of all the "wet-shaving hype" (spoiler alert: I might state very unpopular opinion but it's just my share of thoughts and would like to hear your opinion), all the variety of razors being available (yet vast majority falls in 0.68mm, 0.84mm blade gap), brushes (OK, I'm guilty on this one, but I guess one brush of a kind - boar, synth, badger is just fine), all the different razor-materials (SS, brass, zamak, bronze, aluminium, plastic etc.) and wonder - how did we get up here? Pure consumerism? Technological advantages? I still recall my grandfathers using no-name DE razors even without safety bar... my father still uses his own East-European brass razor... so do we really need all those new fancy stuff? Are there any real advantage, or at some point - it's just a collection thingy, hobby outside of the scope of daily routine and pure need to just "look presentable"?

While I lathered up, I was still in this mode - did I choose right razor? Should I have ordered another "beast" for days like this with double-digit beard growth but I still enjoyed my small-step improvement seen in Razorock BC brush. Nevertheless - I just started with R89, got my angle right (after 3 years I do it blind) and surprisingly - beard just started to fall off! OK, it's not uncommon - the longer the whiskers the more water they'll soak, easier to lather, easier to absorb lather -> hence easier to be cut, right? I finished standard WTG pass and performed cheek's XTG pass only. Needless to say - 9/10 (if BBS is 10). I was bit surprised, really.

R89 is a "mild" razor - but when referenced at reviews it almost sound like "not good enough", "beginners only", "short stubble shaver". Why we think about razors as "agressive = efficient", "mild - will require 12 passes and 2hr shave session"? Afterall it's the blade which performs cutting, everything else is just another piece of a puzzle. How well prepared is your face, how much of a blade wiggle is allowed by razor-head clamping, how nimble is the razor to swipe around face and maintain the ideal angle. I'd say that for my beard - whenever I though I'd need a "more agression" it ended up that my beard required incremental reduction to keep it comfortable, specially with thicker growth. With right soap-water ratio neither of my razors clogged with stubble, rinsed just as usual. I do sorry a little bit for not using Piccolo but it's already somewhat established as an efficient razor, so it wouldn't be such controversy for it as much as for a "mild razor".

Are we perhaps being pulled into the rabbit hole to acquire more and more razors, while mastering one (like our elders used to do) could easily achieve same result? Are we chasing the result, or we're just feeling adventurous about the journey? :) Are we just recreating that feel when we discovered the joy in wet-shaving, when we stopped having ingrown hairs and irritations of any kind? But - what if we don't achieve that any more? What if we're already at that point when further improvements would not be so remarkable (like when transition from cartridge to R/DE89 i.e.) and we end up dissapointed instead (i.e. "my 100$ razor shaves just a tad bit better than my 30$ one"). Not to mention that I could easily buy another R89 and R41 for the price of an average SS razor (+ some soap probably)

I was browsing for some razor in SS range, just for fun and I noticed that many of SS razors do have a bunch of complains but when looked at brass/zamak area of 20-30$ range there are almost >90% positive feedback :D Crazy, isn't it? I'm not saying that it's wrong to acquire another razor, or to have "each of it's kind", I'm quite pro-purchasing better creams/soaps/brushes as my mid-range soaps outlasted some of the cheaper ones, becoming super-economical (1$ soap would last 1 month, while 5$ soap is used for 8 months and still not a 5mm spent from tub), not to mention face-feel and skin care included when soaps with natural ingredient are used. So yeah, I'm supporting some investments in shaving gear, but as said - there are lot's of soap I'd use and I'm not even halfway through my current ones :) So what would happen with the razors? If zamak, brass razors would last us for a lifetime and already provide a great shave - do we need 3x more in price for a 5% improvement in shave feel?

Perhaps I've just did overthinking due to my overload of free time and too much reviews watched in a short time, but still - I couldn't resist from asking the question here. I'm not quite convinced by established YT-shavers, who use premium razors/soaps/brushes, worth of hundreds of $ yet still need 3-4 passes + touchups to shave nicely? Some of them even use lather so thick that it cracks on their face and later on suffer from tremendous aftershave-burn(!?) How's then top-tier products help in quality shaves anyhow :)

I'm like about 50$ in shave-equipment, enjoing remarkable shaves daily (and weekly) see no issues with OC or SB, and yet - I want something "new, durable, to last me a lifetime" you know, just a RAD thing I guess... But - is it really needed? Is it ok just to stop and enjoy the current place of the race, to admit - ok this is it, this works for me?

Please let me know what razor/equipment worked similar for you:
  • cost low-mid money
  • gave you expected results you could live with
  • make you feel like you're ending your quest for a perfect shave
  • something that you could settle on and never* buy anything more (unless needed or at super discount :D)
  • what is your "I think I went over the line with this..." thing? (diminishing return)
Thanks, and sorry for long post.
Interesting points, couch-potato.
IMO, some of us have gone down the consumerism rabbit hole. Even when we own a razor (or two, or three, or...) that does a fine job of shaving, we keep looking for the "even better" razor. I'm guilty.
I get a tremendous shaves from a Razorock Game Changer .84P, a Karve Christopher Bradley brass razor w/D plate, a Henson Shaving AL13 medium and a Gillette 1979 Super Adjustable 109 (Black Beauty). And I own many others. Yet, there is another razor being shipped to me today. It's getting harder to justify the continued acquisitions of these lovely tools, but everyone is accountable to their own conscience. As mentioned previously, this hobby is the cheapest I've engaged in, so far. But for me personally, that only serves to justify the current behavior. Some are not bothered by these issues, and that's great. I know we all truly enjoy shaving and all it's hardware and software. At least we all look really great by engaging in this delightful adventure!

But, as we have all said, "YMMV".
 
Is it ok just to stop and enjoy the current place of the race, to admit - ok this is it, this works for me?

Absolutely! If the internet were to cease to exist tomorrow, all of us would likely happily shave with the equipment we had until we died. Spending more money on equipment and consumables won't guarantee better shaves. Spending more time with the equipment you have will likely deliver better shaves.

The rabbit holes are real, you just don't have to choose to go down all of them! :)
 
I've owned these razors so far (in chronological order):

1. A cheap super aggressive Rimei
2. Gillette Super Adjustable
3. Feather Popular
4. Henson AL13 <--diminishing returns
5. Gillette Super Blue <--gave me exactly what I needed at a low price
6. Gillette Tech

I never went down the soap rabbit hole. I just buy some when I run out and it doesn't need to be anything fancy. They all work pretty well for me.
Nice :) hitting the jackpot on #5 seems quite good, enough to make quest interesting but not to spent too much money. I have same feel for AL13 bought for wife but give it a try - it is well build but not worth being a "replacement" or "spare" razor
 
I started DE shaving in February of 2022. I have to credit the Henson ad I saw on YouTube which piqued my curiosity. I started more modestly with a Van Der Hagen and have small collection of razors (listed in approximate order of acquisition):
  1. Van Der Hagen short handle (Weishi 9306) - Nice mild 1960s-era Gillette Super Speed clone; good for learning
  2. Baili BR179 (Vikings Blade Chieftain clone) - Decent, slightly more aggressive than the VDH but with a larger head
  3. Col. Conk "Major" - Heavyweight razor, medium-aggressive
  4. Edwin Jagger (EJ) DE89 - Attractive chrome plating on very good mild-to-medium razor
  5. Merkur 34C - Good all-around mild-to-medium razor
  6. Parker 87R - Gillette Aristocrat lookalike; more aggressive than the VDH and Super Speed but also more efficient
  7. Razorock Lupo (aluminum) - Great razor that I paired with a stainless handle
  8. Gillette Super Speed - 1971 black handle for nostalgia; shave-wise is indistinguishable (to me) from the VDH
  9. Maggard V3M ("mild") - Chrome handle and Tech clone head
  10. Maggard V3 ("medium") - Matte finish; head similar to the Edwin Jagger DE89/Mühle R89, but slightly more aggressive
  11. West Coast Shaving razor - Inexpensive EJ DE89 clone; decent razor
  12. Blackland Dart - Obtained this razor in a trade with another B&B member
  13. The Winning Razor - The Wet Shaving Club's mild but very efficient stainless steel razor
  14. Gillette Tech - 1940s era; received from @Chef455 in a very generous PIF
  15. (In route) Razorock Lupo .72 - This is a stainless steel razor that will likely replace the aluminum Lupo
Most of these acquisitions were because I was learning and wanted to try different razors without breaking the bank (my budget limit is around $50 USD per razor). The most expensive are the stainless Lupo (purchased at a discount from a fellow B&B member), which currently retails for $70, and the Winning, which currently retails for $55 (I got a 10% discount for Father's Day, which brought the price down to $49.50). I got the Merkur 34C for about $32, the DE 89 from another fellow B&B member at a discount, the aluminum Lupo for $30, the Maggard medium for about $25, and the rest were all less than $20.

[Regarding the Henson, which initially piqued my interest: I'm sure I would like how it shaves, but IMO it's expensive for an aluminum razor and also has (again, IMO) an most unfortunately unattractive handle design. The Winning has a similar head design, is steel, is heaver, looks "cooler," and is, surprisingly, less expensive.]

So I guess I would say that, in my limited experience, I have learned that I can get extremely good shaves from relatively inexpensive razors. I don't need all of them and will likely be selling or giving some of them away. I know that some swear by many more expensive razors, but I have decided at this point that my limit is about $50/razor. (Of course, this is just my personal limit. No judgment from me for those who have no problem buying $200+ razors if they are able!)
Quite a journey isn't it ☺️ thanks for sharing your shave results, much positives for a well-mid range razors
 
Interesting points, couch-potato.
IMO, some of us have gone down the consumerism rabbit hole. Even when we own a razor (or two, or three, or...) that does a fine job of shaving, we keep looking for the "even better" razor. I'm guilty.
I get a tremendous shaves from a Razorock Game Changer .84P, a Karve Christopher Bradley brass razor w/D plate, a Henson Shaving AL13 medium and a Gillette 1979 Super Adjustable 109 (Black Beauty). And I own many others. Yet, there is another razor being shipped to me today. It's getting harder to justify the continued acquisitions of these lovely tools, but everyone is accountable to their own conscience. As mentioned previously, this hobby is the cheapest I've engaged in, so far. But for me personally, that only serves to justify the current behavior. Some are not bothered by these issues, and that's great. I know we all truly enjoy shaving and all it's hardware and software. At least we all look really great by engaging in this delightful adventure!

But, as we have all said, "YMMV".
Yes, I didn't mean anything bad, I love the possibility to have like 1 razor for daily use, 1 cheap for travel in case you lose it - not feel sorry, something for a long stubble, perhaps one of each kind (slant, oc, cc...) and I probably gifted more razors than bought for myself 😁 but what puzzled me was actually the margin when much "better" razors stop delivering "that much better" shaves. Lovely to hear that many of you still pull great shaves from very common razors 🏅👏

And I'm guilty as charged for couple more waiting in queue, you know - just collection wise, although I silently accept that it would be more-less the same shave. Still it's wonderful time for shavers with all remarkable gear being available from 20-200+ $ range to pick from
 
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The thing that seriously made me buy stuff was getting second-rate shaves. I was after better functionality, and I found it.

The Rockwell (R4, R5) was pretty good, a bit heavy and fat-headed though, which is fair enough in something that is a gap test kit as well as a razor. Tried a GC.68P next, then the .84 edition... 👍

I get a tremendous shaves from a Razorock Game Changer .84P

Yes, same here, that's my current favourite.

Will I be desperately chasing after something that can beat it by a few percent? I doubt it.

I'll probably try more razors, but it's no longer an urgent mission.
 
The thing that seriously made me buy stuff was getting second-rate shaves. I was after better functionality, and I found it.
...
Will I be desperately chasing after something that can beat it by a few percent? I doubt it.

I'll probably try more razors, but it's no longer an urgent mission.
+1 same here. For me it's The Winning Razor (TWR). Will another razor perform better? Possibly, but probably not anywhere near its price point.
 
The line that sticks with me is:

"like our elders used to do"

When reading and contributing here, poring over every minutiae of ever razor, blade, gap, exposure, soap, brush, bowl, blade characteristics, etc...I often think about men from the early to mid 20th century.

They had far fewer options, and likely viewed shaving as a tedious daily task, which leads me to believe that they made do with whatever they had, without much fuss.

One razor, one blade, one brush, one mug of soap.

We're spoiled, and the current crop of manufacturers profit from it.

As far as equipment, I get fantastic shaves from my vintage $5 ball-end Techs and could be perfectly happy using that forever, with Astra blades, Proraso Red, an inexpensive Omega boar brush, and Old Spice or Clubman AS.

On the modern front, my taste is also modest, and my current favorite being a $65 Razorock Game Changer 68P with a UFO handle.

I would be happy with either of those being my one and only, forever razor.
 
I love razors (my favorite part of shaving). I've made excuses to myself to always buy more!
As if I had 20 different (types) of beards to cut in 1 day, LOL!!
Soaps & brushes; I'm very content with what I use and have no interest in any others.
So I've recently adopted the method of "Buy & sell" in order to feed the razor RAD.
I'm sure many here do the same!
Before that, I was keeping them all!
I now keep what I really really like but get rid of the ones that I don't totally like.
Like that I don't feel like I'm just burning money and I get the enjoyment of trying them all.
 
Last edited:
I love razors (my favorite part of shaving). I've made excuses to myself to always buy more!
As if I had 20 different (types) of beards to cut in 1 day, LOL!!
Soaps & brushes; I'm very content with what I use and have no interest in any others.
So I've recently adopted the method of "Buy & sell" in order to feed the razor RAD.
I'm sure many here do the same!
Before that, I was keeping them all!
I now keep what I really really like but get rid of the ones that I don't totally like.
Like that I don't feel like I'm just burning money and I get the enjoyment of trying them all.
At least, with razors, they can be cleaned "as good as new" for the most part and sold.

I have a couple synth brushes I don't like and one mixed bristle "porcupine" brush. They are all cheap enough that selling them makes no sense. Since I really dislike them, I don't even feel comfortable giving them away.

As I'm sitting here (woke up for a few hours), I decided, I'm going to actually throw them away today.
 
Well if Wilkinson Sword and/or Gillette had gotten their act together sooner and the current Wilkinson Sword Classic or King C Gillette been so easily available to buy in bricks and mortar shops in 2013, I’d have been happy with both and content to settle with them both.
Incidentally I bought a second Wilkinson Sword Classic in a branch of Boots the other day reduced to £10(including 10 blades)!

I got by with a black Wilkinson Sword Classic, Edwin Jagger DE89 and Merkur Futur for just shy of 4 years before investing in the BEAST (R41) and then I wanted a TTO so bought a Parker and so on… Brush wise I made do with my Wilkinson Sword and a Cyril Salter pure badger for well over 5 years before I decided to try out a Semogue boar brush.

My vice has always been creams and soaps because I’m a fraghead.

Anyway…

  • cost low-mid money - Edwin Jagger DE89/King C Gillette razors; Gentleman’s Face Care Club brush/Razorock Tuxedo Snowman brush/Palmolive shaving cream/LEA menthol shaving cream (LEA cream is in huge 150 tube for a very low price of under £3)
  • gave you expected results you could live with - Wilkinson Sword Classic (the latest one).
  • make you feel like you're ending your quest for a perfect shave - Rockwell 6S, which was a birthday present last year. It’s so smooth to shave with.

  • something that you could settle on and never* buy anything more (unless needed or at super discount :D) - Razorock synthetic brushes. I own 2 - the Tuxedo Snowman and the Italian barberpole.
  • what is your "I think I went over the line with this..." thing? (diminishing return) - Is this even possible?!? Can I get back to you on this?
 
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