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Against hoppy beer

As a proponent of craft beers and self-confessed hophead, I can see the point being made here.

In general terms, once most people begin drinking craft beer they either gravitate towards the hoppier beers or the darker beers, and then delve deeper still into the extremes of either camp as their palate matures. When the uninitiated then turn to one of their craft beer-drinking friends for a suggestion, they either get hit with a mouthful of the strongest devil-hopped IPA or the darkest heaviest stout ever to squeeze forth from a tap; thus turning them off to craft beer in general, and all the more-palatable flavors between the two extremes. I'm guilty of providing just such a disservice myself, in the past. As such I think it's crucial that the initiated help the newcomer find a beer that fits their particular palate at that time and then let them develop their own tastes as they see fit.

Still, I can see why the craft beer industry is gearing their production towards the extremes of the spectrum. As a lover of IPAs, stouts, and porters, I am now finding it harder to enjoy the middle spectrum of craft (or any, for that matter) beers. Sure, I still enjoy a nice crisp wheat beer on a hot summer's day, but by and large everything else just seems kind of blah after you've spent some time on the fringes of hop and barley.


sleepy
 
There are 4 ingredients in beer. Going extreme with one never made sense to me. Plus, where is the craftsmanship if the goal is more hops than the next guy or darkest, heaviest beer on record?
 
And unfortunately hops are a quick way for beginning brewers to disguise flaws in their beer, by using the hops’ strong flavor to overcome any possible off tastes. Do you regret throwing those juniper twigs in the boil? Did you forget to sterilize a piece of equipment and are now fretting about bacteria? Quick! Hops to the rescue!
This is the argument against hoppy beers that I have heard from someone who enjoys North American beer and once worked in a brewery.


My argument against lots of hops is that they taste nasty. :sleep: Give me malty flavours any day.
 
What I found interesting was where the author explain that above certain level of hops, the drinker cannot taste the difference if more hops are added. Too much of a great thing.

I do enjoy the full taste spectrum of beers where hops are concerned. The lighter beers are often just the ticket in a given moment, or when are pairing the with food as you would with wine.
 
After going nuts over all of the local craft beers for the last 10 years or so, I have gotten "hopped out." The hop levels have been taken too extreme, and I am just tired of it.

PBR and Bud Light have been an enjoyable break because now they are the brews that stand out as different.
 
I am most not uncertainly against being against hoppy beers!
Well said, I think.

In all seriousness, I am hopped out myself. Still like them, but wow are they often overdone. Then there's sour beer...what's that about? I guess peeps are always searching for a new flavor.
 

ChefJohnBoy-ardee

Contributor
Well said, I think.

In all seriousness, I am hopped out myself. Still like them, but wow are they often overdone. Then there's sour beer...what's that about? I guess peeps are always searching for a new flavor.
Sour beers are older than time! Nothing new there... Some are supposed to be soured, others happened by accident. Too sour, bleh, good amount, Great! But you can take that too sour and mix it with a good beer and end up with a drinkable, unique soured ale that people love.

Souring, is like playing with fermentation temp for certain yeast strains. Or Wild yeast or brettymocycus or however brett is actually spelled...

I'm not hopped out. Keep the hops coming. Over 100 IBU's? Bring it on. Am I going to go out of my way to find one?! Depends on the beer, more than likely no I will not. Do I turn my head up at porters, stouts and Belgian ales? No. I enjoy them all, I just prefer hoppy ales more. My go to beer is Oskar Blue's Dale's Pale Ale and then Smuttynose Finestkind IPA. What was the last beer I bought? Stone's Russian Imperial Stout and their 2013 Barley wine.
 
I used to hate hoppy beers. Now I really like them, BUT I can't drink more than 2 at a time.

They really can be overwhelming.
 
Sour beers are older than time! Nothing new there... Some are supposed to be soured, others happened by accident. Too sour, bleh, good amount, Great! But you can take that too sour and mix it with a good beer and end up with a drinkable, unique soured ale that people love.
Many original Flemish Brabant (Vlaams-Brabant) region beers (Lambics) have a more or less sour taste. They are brewed using natural yeasts from the Zennevalei region, and date back at least a thousand years ago.
 

ChefJohnBoy-ardee

Contributor
Oud Bruin ales are blended browns. Varying stages of sourness to get a great ale. Also very old.

IPA's won't vanish again and people will always try to be the best/hoppiest/outrageous. Just the way the world works. Craft beers are just getting more buzz and so the people are listening to the buzz and hype. Drink, Enjoy, Be Happy.
 
To me a good balance of malt to hops shows off the talents of a good brewer. Any new brewer can brew a beer and load it with as much hops as they can, as it will hide any imperfections they happen to make along the way. Alot has to do with the rush to market with new craft brewers popping up all the time. It's certianly easier to brew an overly hoppy beer than to spend years perfecting your recipe.
 

ouch

Stjynnkii membörd dummpsjterd
Moderator Emeritus
As a proponent of craft beers and self-confessed hophead, I can see the point being made here.

In general terms, once most people begin drinking craft beer they either gravitate towards the hoppier beers or the darker beers, and then delve deeper still into the extremes of either camp as their palate matures. When the uninitiated then turn to one of their craft beer-drinking friends for a suggestion, they either get hit with a mouthful of the strongest devil-hopped IPA or the darkest heaviest stout ever to squeeze forth from a tap; thus turning them off to craft beer in general, and all the more-palatable flavors between the two extremes. I'm guilty of providing just such a disservice myself, in the past. As such I think it's crucial that the initiated help the newcomer find a beer that fits their particular palate at that time and then let them develop their own tastes as they see fit.

Still, I can see why the craft beer industry is gearing their production towards the extremes of the spectrum. As a lover of IPAs, stouts, and porters, I am now finding it harder to enjoy the middle spectrum of craft (or any, for that matter) beers. Sure, I still enjoy a nice crisp wheat beer on a hot summer's day, but by and large everything else just seems kind of blah after you've spent some time on the fringes of hop and barley.


sleepy
Great post!
 
Many of the American craft beers are too hoppy for me. To my palate it ends up tasting like bitters soapy dishwater.
these days if I'm drinking Merkan, I'm going for wheat. Troegs Dreamweaver or an Allagash White.
Or mask the hops taste like a Magic Hat #9.
 
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