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Wow

Hi, I'm stunned.. I've been sitting here for a good 2hours reading around about this and that.. I get nothing yet :). I've been DE shaving for awhile and testing soaps, cremes and stuffs.

Now I wanna move onto Straight razors. I want things that looks nice! I think I got it right that when ordering a custom one you can get that extra bling on it, right?.

But the question.. Where do I start in this jungle I read some about testing all the diffrent sizes and lengths, but there must be some kind of start or maybe you can get some tips. I'm just like that guy in the "Am I an idiot?" thread. I don't care to much about the cost I just want the feel and the quality !

Maybe I've almost copied all he askes and so but I wanted my own thread :).

And as a sidenote, I'm tying to get a place in a straight razor course. They educate people in the art of straight shaving, just hoping I can attain it.

Thanks
 
If you have't already, I'd consider Joel's sticky on the interactive guide to straight shaving (at the top of this forum). There is a wealth of helpful information there and in wiki. Even after you watch/read everything, I'd check back on things you've read. With me, I seemed to absorb something different the more I reread something. I've found searching through these forums and reading old post to be very informative as you have access to the experiences of many members both new and tenured through the stages of their learning curve.
 
I think you'll get the same answers that FrankC got. A custom razor is nice (I'd love one myself when my skills have improved) but you're probably better starting with a one that you won't mind dropping or dinging on the tap!

Steve at The Invisible Edge has a nice range of new Dovo's and restored vintage razors at very reasonable prices (plus he puts a really nice edge on them so they are "shave ready".

Larry at Whipped Dog is also very highly regarded here. His razors aren't as "pretty" but they will be perfect to start with.
 
As was advised in the other thread, consider the fact that you may drop a bundle on a 8/8 Wedge only to find that your best results are a 5/8 Full Hollow.
I'd advise you to pick something up that won't break the bank till you see what you like, and even if Straight Razors are for you.
Joels Tutorial is pure gold.
 
My suggestion is not to get a custom razor until you learn how to use a regular one first. Otherwise, the chances are you will invariably do something wrong and damage the "bling". You can find quality razors out there that will do a terrific job while you get good at using one.

Once you have a handle on the straight razor thing, then go for something fancy. There are more and more custom razor guys showing up and the time you take during the learning process will allow you to research the makers.
 
Go vintage.You get much more.You get a part of history of this alsome hobby + I think they were made better,IMO.One more thing.Base your first purchase on your hair growth.If you have coarse beard growth,tend to go towards wedgelike razors.Normal growth go towards hollow grinds.Andy ou dont have to spend a lot of money for a good razor.Hope this helps.Good luck on your new beginning!:001_smile
 
Go vintage.You get much more.You get a part of history of this alsome hobby + I think they were made better,IMO.One more thing.Base your first purchase on your hair growth.If you have coarse beard growth,tend to go towards wedgelike razors.Normal growth go towards hollow grinds.Andy ou dont have to spend a lot of money for a good razor.Hope this helps.Good luck on your new beginning!:001_smile
I'm not quite sure I'd agree with the part about a mass produced, by the thousands, factory anything would be better than something that was made individually with care and attention to detail... But, then again, I don't know how many customs you have that you have compared them to... I know you don't have one of mine or you wouldn't have said that...:biggrin1:
 
Wow, stunned again. Thanks for all the great advice. I've read some of Joel's sticky and I intend to read it all, just need the time for it.

Well then I will buy a cheaper one to start with but what do I start with I mean there must be some specific kriteria according to what kind of beard you got.

I got thick and hard beard but it's not extremely dense what should I aim for?
I've been trying to understand it but I guess it will come in time.
"Welcome to the jungle" !

BillEllis I would like to research you, you got an homepage? Maybe you can PM it :)..

Thanks, I hope I got a natural talent for this. I can't say how much DE shaving has done for me. I almost cried everytime I shaved before :)

Thanks alot! :thumbup:
 
I got thick and hard beard but it's not extremely dense what should I aim for?

I've got wires growing out of me. Even after a BBS shave, the hair that is under my skin still shows through as blue. Nice heavy wedges have worked the best for me.
 
The sticky recommends Tony Miller strops, but those are no longer for sale. Are the strops on The Invisible Edge comparable?
I'm still using the Illinois strop I bought 30 years ago. I don't have one of Steve's strops but he's a quality guy and I'm sure they're first rate.
 
If you keep an eye on BST you might find a decent deal on a strop. I've seen the occasional Tony Miller up for sale there.
 
As a starter I would recommend snapping those DE blades your using in half and load them into a shavette. This way you get to focus on your shaving technique first. If you jump right to an actual straight razor it would be difficult to tell if problems are due to your shaving technique, or the blade wasn't honed properly or your stropping messed up the blade etc..
 
As a starter I would recommend snapping those DE blades your using in half and load them into a shavette. This way you get to focus on your shaving technique first. If you jump right to an actual straight razor it would be difficult to tell if problems are due to your shaving technique, or the blade wasn't honed properly or your stropping messed up the blade etc..

Oh, my! Sorry to be contrary on this. Maybe it's just me, but the last thing in the world I would tell a novice to use would be a shavette to learn techniques normally reserved for straight razors.

As long as I have been using straights, I still bleed dang near every time I use a shavette. My vote is no on that one.
 
Oh, my! Sorry to be contrary on this. Maybe it's just me, but the last thing in the world I would tell a novice to use would be a shavette to learn techniques normally reserved for straight razors.

As long as I have been using straights, I still bleed dang near every time I use a shavette. My vote is no on that one.

I'm going to have to echo what my good friend Bill's shared with you. Shavette's are neat... but they're no way to learn a straight razor, in fact, it may do more harm than good.

Hope this helps,
 
I'm going to have to echo what my good friend Bill's shared with you. Shavette's are neat... but they're no way to learn a straight razor, in fact, it may do more harm than good.

Hope this helps,
This is worth repeating a second time. Using a shavette to learn to shave with a staight is a terrible idea. The shavette is a bastard product provided as a quick fix for barbers when local health departments started to require that straights be sterilized after every use (because of fear of AIDS). Barbers needed something that they could hold like a straight and they already had the skill necessary to control it. I've been shaving with a straight for 30 years and shavettes scare the heck out of me.
 
Indeed they aren't a good idea ime, though you can get away with a feather or fai shavette.

My second razor is a beautiful ti 5/8" flying tudor rose, i got fed up with my gold dollar at the time so went to the opposite extreme, in all honestly i wish id stuck with a good vintage.

It's not just the risk of damage from dropping or incorrect stropping, a vintage razor will often have a more fragile edge, in no bad way you understand as she's my best shaver. It just requires a gentle more experienced hand otherwise you wind up wearing out the edge very fast.

Besides like the guys say there are a ton of good vintage straight razors out there, half the fun is finding one you like, and the searching to see if it's any good before you click buy.

Larry andro will sort out out, he's a straight up guy and sells at very good prices.
 
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