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ROBUSTA .... Is there a non " earthy " brand ?

I've tried the top Greek and Turkish brands of robusta coffee but couldn't get them down without lots of cream and sugar .... Viet Nam produces the most robusta but it's used mainly with a heavy dose of sweetened condensed milk , hot or cold . Is there any robusta out there that is more palatable without the sweetness overdose ?
 

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Star_Wahl_Clipper_Treker

Likes a fat handle in his hand
Hello there!

Is there any robusta out there that is more palatable without the sweetness overdose ?

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The answer is, yes there is! You might recall a coffee I have drank many times in the past called Good Brother's Neapolitan. It is a coffee blend of 80% Arabica and 20% Robusta, and happens to be a good mix for me. But I often use chocolate creamers and splenda in my coffee anyways, so its not too big of a deal. But I can't drink straight Robusta coffee, cause its just too much for me, far too bitter.

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IMO, drinking only Robusta is a sure way to become, over time, disgusted by the notion of coffee. No matter the brand, Robusta is, plain and simple, tasteless, bland, bitter, ashy, earthy and so on.
Arabica is much more varied. Some (me included) may find the resulting liquid to be too weak, especially if it's too diluted (like Americano) or too gently roasted.
The best way is the middle way: a blend of Arabica and Robusta. Ether prepackaged or mixing the beans at home. The ratio - by repeated trials, and again when switching brands. This way, you have the best of the two worlds: taste and flavor from Arabica, backed by strength and body from Robusta.
In conclusion, you can always drink 100% Arabica as is, but drinking 100% Robusta is a no-no.
 
Hello there!




The answer is, yes there is! You might recall a coffee I have drank many times in the past called Good Brother's Neapolitan. It is a coffee blend of 80% Arabica and 20% Robusta, and happens to be a good mix for me. But I often use chocolate creamers and splenda in my coffee anyways, so its not too big of a deal. But I can't drink straight Robusta coffee, cause its just too much for me, far too bitter.

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80-20 BLEND should give the extra flavor without bitterness or a massive robusta caffeine dose .... Does your grinder put out a true powder for Greek - Turkish coffee ?
 
IMO, drinking only Robusta is a sure way to become, over time, disgusted by the notion of coffee. No matter the brand, Robusta is, plain and simple, tasteless, bland, bitter, ashy, earthy and so on.
Arabica is much more varied. Some (me included) may find the resulting liquid to be too weak, especially if it's too diluted (like Americano) or too gently roasted.
The best way is the middle way: a blend of Arabica and Robusta. Ether prepackaged or mixing the beans at home. The ratio - by repeated trials, and again when switching brands. This way, you have the best of the two worlds: taste and flavor from Arabica, backed by strength and body from Robusta.
In conclusion, you can always drink 100% Arabica as is, but drinking 100% Robusta is a no-no.
I agree.... I just can't take that " dirt " flavor , although the super sweetened and creamed robusta at Greek festivals tastes really good . I just don't want to overdose on sugar , not to mention the huge amount of caffeine robusta has . The last pure robusta coffee I had at a Greek festival kept me awake all night .
 

Star_Wahl_Clipper_Treker

Likes a fat handle in his hand
80-20 BLEND should give the extra flavor without bitterness or a massive robusta caffeine dose

100% agreed! :thumbup1:

Does your grinder put out a true powder for Greek - Turkish coffee ?

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Nope, my Baratza Virtuoso+ grinder is not designed to produce a powder required for Turkish coffee. My grinder can barely produce a fine enough grind to do a non-pressurized espresso. My grinder is mainly designed for all other brewing methods, from French Press, to Drip, to Pour Over, to Arerowpress.

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I know your a Turkish coffee lover... If your looking for a motorized grinder to produce a fine powder to do Turkish coffee, your going to be wanting the Baratza Forte BG grinder. This grinder has both macro and micro grind adjustments, that allow you to fine tune the grinder, in order to match your brewers requirements. This unit is also great for pressurized or non pressurized espresso.
 
If memory serves, Robusto has more caffeine than Aribica and a better aroma, but it tastes like wet cardboard and there's nothing you can do to improve it. Mixing the two may make the blend smell better than pure Aribica, but for me, at least, it ruins the flavor. YMMV, of course, but IMHO, unless all you care about is getting as big of a caffeine hit as possible, it's not worth bothering with.
 
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