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Cicadas: What's all the Buzz about?

Cicadas: What's all the Buzz about?

  • Yes, I like them...it's just not the sound of Summer without them!

  • No, I don't like them because after a while...the constant 'buzzing' can be a bother to one's ears.

  • Art is a Cicada


Results are only viewable after voting.
$130503-coslog-cicada-525p_photoblog600.jpg Cicadas...besides being the sound (song?), of Summer for some or the noise of the season for others, "Did you know that [these insects [are] on the rise [this year]? "Backyard bug-watchers are seeing the winged bugs known as cicadas come out of their holes in New Jersey and North Carolina after 17 years of underground slumber — and scientists say a full-scale outbreak may not be far behind.

"There are some pretty convincing reports coming out," John Cooley, an expert on cicadas at the University of Connecticut, told NBC News. "It's fair to say it's starting, but it's still in the very early stages. It certainly isn't going all crazy. ... When it really happens, it's not going to be like this. It's going to be shovel loads of cicadas."

Cooley maintains one of the most closely watched websites for this spring's emergence, Magicicada.org. Little bug logos are popping up on different areas of Magicicada's interactive map, which means a smattering of Internet users are seeing cicadas coming out of the ground. In some cases, they're even seeing the bugs crawling around as adults.
Cooley, however, says that we ain't seen nothing yet. "When it really happens, we expect that website will just light up," he said.

The outlook is similar on other bug-watching sites — such as Radiolab's Cicada Tracker, which is encouraging listeners to put out their own soil-thermometer setups. Those readings are considered key leading indicators for cicada activity, because researchers have found that the bugs emerge en masse when the springtime soil temperature reaches 64 degrees Fahrenheit (18 degrees Celsius). A different temperature tracker set up by the Sutron information network for the Washington area suggests that the nation's capital still has a way to go before the cicadas come out.

Insects are expected to emerge by the billions on the East Coast, across an area stretching from North Carolina to Connecticut. This army of bugs, known as 'Brood II', [a distinct population staticical number, they carry Roman numerals like Brood II, X, XIV and XIX, which will emerge in 2013, 2021, 2025 and 2024, respectively], spends 17 years feeding on plant roots underground.

Sometime between late April and early June, depending on the weather, the insects burrow out of the ground as nymphs. The juveniles shed their outer skins, crawl up trees or buildings, and fly around to find their mates. The females lay their eggs, and then the adults die in droves. All this happens in the course of four to six weeks.

$imagesizer.jpg

After another few weeks, a new generation of nymphs hatch from the eggs, drop to the ground, burrow into the soil and begin the next 17-year cycle.

...When it comes, [the 'tsunami'] of cicada emerging can fill the skies with flying bugs and fill the ears with a hum [buzz] as loud as a jet engine or lawn mower. Those who have been through the full-frontal buzz say the experience can be disconcerting if you're not prepared for it. But cicadas are not considered a threat to humans. In fact, they can
be quite delicious" (https://www.google.com/search?q=cicada+recipes).



Read More: http://cosmiclog.nbcnews.com/_news/...nd-scientists-get-ready-for-the-big-buzz?lite



"Unlike the singing Cicadas, the silent fireflies burn themselves". Japanese Poverb

PS I happen to like Cicadas because for a brief peiod...they are the 'Sound of Summer'! :thumbsup:


 
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There's all kinds of bizarre alien life forms that we don't have to deal with out here in California.

Our biggest problem is mosquitoes during the summer from people that leave standing water on their property, and flies during the summer.
Bees, wasps, spiders... all pretty minor out here.

Thank God we don't have to deal with Love Bugs!
 
Thank God we don't have to deal with Love Bugs!
Rich:
Out here, the mere mention of :001_tt1: Bugs and what they can do to a paint job (if left 'unchecked' on one's vehicle...I tend to visit the local car wash at every end destination), is likely to bring about thoughts of pure dread and the battle ahead to combat them.


The Mrs. and I moved back here after being away for around 10yrs, so I can't tell you any past history on this flying pest, but the one year we were here (what year was

Hurricane Rita?
), ...them Love Bugs were 'out in force' (like a plague from the Bible...I kid you not) and it was best to get behind a 'big rig' (being the truck would act as a sheild and take most, if not all of the bug debris), if driving on the highway (not really a issue within the City).


$200px-Lovebugs.jpg
"The purpose of [a car wash] is washing the dust of daily life off [y]our [ride]". Pablo Picasso
 
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At first I like it because that means summer is in full swing. But after awhile it gets kind of annoying.

My dog used to love Cicada season when she was still with us. One summer she started throwing up and we couldn't figure out why. So we took her to the vet who tells us there is nothing wrong with her but tells us to watch what she's doing when we let her outside in the backyard. We discovered that she had developed a taste for Cicada and would chase them down and feast on them.

She continued to do it but she stopped getting sick. I guess she figured where to draw the line.
 

Mike H

Instagram Famous
Moderator Emeritus
Cicadas are fun and yummy. A little butter, garlic, salt.
Don't limit them just to butter and garlic!
http://www.newsdesk.umd.edu/pdf/cicada recipes.PDF

Ouch - this one's for you

El Chirper Tacos
Ingredients:
2 tablespoons butter or peanut oil
1/2 pound newly-emerged cicadas
3 serrano chilies, raw, finely chopped
1 tomato, finely chopped
1 onion, finely chopped
1/2 tsp ground pepper or to taste
1/2 tsp cumin
3 tsp taco seasoning mix
1 handful cilantro, chopped
Taco shells, to serve
Sour cream
Shredded cheddar cheese
Shredded lettuce
Directions:
1. Heat the butter or oil in a frying pan and fry the cicadas for 10 minutes, or until cooked through.
2. Remove from pan and roughly chop into 1/4 inch cubes. Place back in pan.
3. Add the chopped onions, chilies, and tomato, and season with salt, and fry for another 5 minutes on medium-low heat.
4. Sprinkle with ground pepper, cumin, and oregano, to taste.
5. Serve in taco shells and garnish with cilantro, sour cream, lettuce, and cheddar cheese .
Yield:
2 main course servings
 
I would kill them all if I could find the damn things in my trees! :(
Some binoculars and a BB gun would do the trick :a41:

Annoying as they may be everything in nature has a purpose. Although an animal that spends years underground, comes out to grow wings and then dies sounds kind of odd.
 
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ouch

Stjynnkii membörd dummpsjterd
Moderator Emeritus
Don't limit them just to butter and garlic!
http://www.newsdesk.umd.edu/pdf/cicada%20recipes.PDF

Ouch - this one's for you

El Chirper Tacos
Ingredients:
2 tablespoons butter or peanut oil
1/2 pound newly-emerged cicadas
3 serrano chilies, raw, finely chopped
1 tomato, finely chopped
1 onion, finely chopped
1/2 tsp ground pepper or to taste
1/2 tsp cumin
3 tsp taco seasoning mix
1 handful cilantro, chopped
Taco shells, to serve
Sour cream
Shredded cheddar cheese
Shredded lettuce
Directions:
1. Heat the butter or oil in a frying pan and fry the cicadas for 10 minutes, or until cooked through.
2. Remove from pan and roughly chop into 1/4 inch cubes. Place back in pan.
3. Add the chopped onions, chilies, and tomato, and season with salt, and fry for another 5 minutes on medium-low heat.
4. Sprinkle with ground pepper, cumin, and oregano, to taste.
5. Serve in taco shells and garnish with cilantro, sour cream, lettuce, and cheddar cheese .
Yield:
2 main course servings
Sorry, I consider cicadas to be meat.

The last time they appeared in these parts, the great state of NJ declared my back yard to be ground zero.
 
Some binoculars and a BB gun would do the trick :a41:

Annoying as they may be everything in nature has a purpose. Although an animal that spends years underground, comes out to grow wings and then dies sounds kind of odd.
If you think that's odd google the dobsonfly. Lives several years in rivers and streams, crawls out to burrow underground, emerges to fly and mate. Has probably the most fearsome set of jaws ever seen on a flying insect.

All the recipes for cicadas are ironic. The purpose of emerging en mass is to overwhelm predators by sheer numbers. Most will be eaten but enough survive to mate and make the next generation.
 
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Sorry, I consider cicadas to be meat.

The last time they appeared in these parts, the great state of NJ declared my back yard to be ground zero.
Unless you raise all your own food you are already eating insects as there are some in the packaged/canned food from the store.

Humans have some of the enzymes to digest bugs...its is not an accident. I'll be lucky to be able to find some Cicadas...live a little since your at ground zero!
 
I'm surprised the buzzing cicada key chains with the flashing eyes haven't made a return. I had one in the 80's or 90's. It was really annoying.
 
If you think that's odd google the dobsonfly. Lives several years in rivers and streams, crawls out to burrow underground, emerges to fly and mate. Has probably the most fearsome set of jaws ever seen on a flying insect.

All the recipes for cicadas are ironic. The purpose of emerging en mass is to overwhelm predators by sheer numbers. Most will be eaten but enough survive to mate and make the next generation.
Hellgramites? I didn't know they were the Larval stage of something else.

On another note I'm an avid Bass angler. I came across this lure that resembles a cicada. It may come in handy this summer with the outbreak.

$MBSIG-CRK-1.jpg
 
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I grew used to Cicadas while living in Oklahoma for several years. They were simply a part of very summer, although more numerous some years. The dog liked to pounce on the ones that fell out of the trees onto their backs, wings buzzing loudly.
 

Toothpick

Needs milk and a bidet!
Moderator
Some binoculars and a BB gun would do the trick :a41:

Annoying as they may be everything in nature has a purpose. Although an animal that spends years underground, comes out to grow wings and then dies sounds kind of odd.
i'd get in on this action. 6-pk of beer, lawn chair, bb gun w/scope. sign me up!
 
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