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Breaking in boar

I am new to shaving (just got my first shave: http://badgerandblade.com/vb/showthread.php/291600-First-(non-cartridge)-shave!) and my dad gave me one of the boar brushes hes had around but not really used. I read the section in the wiki on breaking in brushes here: http://wiki.badgerandblade.com/How_to_Break_in_a_Shaving_Brush and I just wondered if there were any additional steps I should take, and things I should avoid doing, and if there were some soaps that were better than others. I planned on just making a lather with Cella soap and letting it sit over night.

I read around here and read around here that breaking in a brush is important for boar. I did shave with it, but I am a newb so I really have nothing to compare it with. Thanks for the advice!

-The Nuclear Shaver
 
just use it - if it has a funk do a couple pratice lathers but you don't need to let lather sit over night on it.
 
Do NOT make a lather and let it sit in the brush... that is a sure fire way to totally ruin the bristle. The acidic nature will kill the bristles if left for a long time.

It's simple... just use the brush! Some people will do 6-10 test lathers (lather, rinse, let dry, repeat) before they use the brush for the first time.
 
Glad I asked! Is that type of break in good for other types of brushes or just skip it all together? Is it okay to clean the brush with vinegar for short periods of time?
 
Do NOT make a lather and let it sit in the brush... that is a sure fire way to totally ruin the bristle. The acidic nature will kill the bristles if left for a long time.

It's simple... just use the brush! Some people will do 6-10 test lathers (lather, rinse, let dry, repeat) before they use the brush for the first time.

I'm going to disagree with this 100%. The method in the wiki is the way to go. There's nothing in the lather that will "kill the bristles". There are brushes that turn up in antique stores with 30 year old dried lather in them, and they have been rinsed and used with no issues. Soap is neutral, alkaline if anything, and won't damage your brush whatsoever.

Really all you need to do is use it, give it a good shake, and let it dry on the counter. Simple! :thumbup:
 
Do NOT make a lather and let it sit in the brush... that is a sure fire way to totally ruin the bristle. The acidic nature will kill the bristles if left for a long time.

Er... typo there? Lather ought to be slightly basic, since lye is used to saponify the fatty ingredients. Badly-made soap can be a stronger base, making lather that can irritate the skin.

Anyway I have used a number of boar brushes, and I have started every one of them with an overnight lather soak. I also have running experiment with a beater Boreal, which I never rinse. So its hair sits in wet or dried-up lather all the time, just like the old-timers used to do with their Ever-Ready and Rubberset brushes.

It's simple... just use the brush! Some people will do 6-10 test lathers (lather, rinse, let dry, repeat) before they use the brush for the first time.

That works too.
 
Glad I asked! Is that type of break in good for other types of brushes or just skip it all together? Is it okay to clean the brush with vinegar for short periods of time?

Cant speak for horse but there isn't much of a break in period for badger. If there is a break in for badger, it's so small I can't notice from my prior experiences. Badger tips don't split, etc like boar. I know there are some things people do when first getting a badger but seems more related to getting out the smell than anything else.
 
Cant speak for horse but there isn't much of a break in period for badger. If there is a break in for badger, it's so small I can't notice from my prior experiences. Badger tips don't split, etc like boar. I know there are some things people do when first getting a badger but seems more related to getting out the smell than anything else.

Agreed. There's a smell with new badger brushes (sometimes), but there's no break in to speak of. I have yet to try a horse brush.
 
If it's a boar brush, make sure it dries out properly between uses, as that's when the ends split and it gets softer on the face.
 
i had a boar for 17 years, rest its poor soul-used it till the knot fell right off. Granted it looked pretty tweeked but still worked. not once soaked it in vinegar, after i used it i just rinsed it out and let it sit back in the cup, i know now this was no way to treat it.
now i have more and rotate them, wash them out, fluff, let them hang dry a day then set it fan up----only time will tell . my point---- just Use it, it will break in , rinsing them out is the key-I should have kept it to show pictures , but it was from an old girlfrieind and i have been married 16+ years
 
i had a boar for 17 years, rest its poor soul-used it till the knot fell right off.

Yep, I had one like that, used it every day for 20 years because I didn't know better and had no way to know that it needed to dry out and split to break in. Anyway it eventually rotted from within as it never really dried out and he wooden handle just fell apart. Today I have a number of brushes that I rotate and let dry out properly, most of the handles are now resin or plastic and so I expect that if these brushes last 20 years with this treatment then I will be more than happy.
 
For several generations men bought boar brushes and broke them in just by using them. I doubt that most of them did several days of "break-in" lathers such as I do. I'm with Joseph on this, I see no advantage over the longer life of the brush to hurrying up break-in.

I happen to have moderately hard water, so occasionally clean the bristles using vinegar/water short soak and then rinse as well as a borax/water cleaning.

Additionally, I use a small juice glass or mason jar to soak my brushes which is guaranteed to keep the brush handle an inch or two above the soaking water.
 
If it's a boar brush, make sure it dries out properly between uses, as that's when the ends split and it gets softer on the face.
Agree. Takes about 36 hrs. to dry. If I have a new boar and I'm using other brushes in rotation, I accelerate breakend with nonface hand lathering, I always let it dry completely.

Gus
 
For several generations men bought boar brushes and broke them in just by using them. I doubt that most of them did several days of "break-in" lathers such as I do. I'm with Joseph on this, I see no advantage over the longer life of the brush to hurrying up break-in.

I happen to have moderately hard water, so occasionally clean the bristles using vinegar/water short soak and then rinse as well as a borax/water cleaning.

Additionally, I use a small juice glass or mason jar to soak my brushes which is guaranteed to keep the brush handle an inch or two above the soaking water.
i keep hearing this vinegar and borax thing, whats the difference between the 2, is'nt borax a bleach
 
My chemistry is a little rusty but I think borax is actual acidic while bleach is basic. Its also used for shielding against neutrons I believe.

So, I think, after reading this thread, my best bet is to just use the brush and break in it that way. My jerry rigged my tooth brush holder to hang the brush so it can dry out really well. Thanks for all the input!
 
My chemistry is a little rusty but I think borax is actual acidic while bleach is basic. Its also used for shielding against neutrons I believe.

It's the element boron that's used in nuclear reactors - borax is the compound sodium tetraborate.
 
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