What's new
  • Guest
    As per our long standing policy of not permitting medical advice on the forum - all threads concerning the Coronavirus will be locked.
    For more info on the coronavirus please see the link below:
    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/summary.html

Your .22 Rimfire

If I remember my Kansas geography, you are between Topeka and Lawrence, so you are remote enough to enjoy peace and quiet, yet not too far from civilization. I think a pretty busy railroad is on the south bank of the Kaw, so that might be noisy at times. You are close to Perry and Clinton reservoirs, and if you like to fish, those are two good fishing lakes. The Kaw has some big catfish by the way. I don't think you could have done any better if you are a sportsman, with hunting, shooting, fishing and boating all nearby. Be sure to take in the sunsets, they can be stunning out here in the great plains.
 
Be sure to take in the sunsets, they can be stunning out here in the great plains.
I lived in the tropics for 11 years. The sunsets there have nothing on KS sunsets. Absolutely nothing. That said, to be fair, there is really something special about seeing the sun set into a ocean of water vs an ocean of barley.
 

Toothpick

Needs milk and a bidet!
Moderator
This thread has got me wanting to build one. I’m thinking the Ruger 10/22 is the most customizable with aftermarket parts.
 

kelbro

Alfred Spatchcock
Volquartsen TG-2000 trigger group and ultra-lightweight bolt. Tactical Solutions SB-X barrel. Silencerco Warlock II can. About the only thing original is the receiver!
 
All weather 10/22 with Volquartsen trigger, Trijicon RMR and a couple of other small mods.
I have 2 x 110 Round drum magazines that work flawlessly.
Its an awesome plinker.
 

FarmerTan

George Bailey Fanboy
All weather 10/22 with Volquartsen trigger, Trijicon RMR and a couple of other small mods.
I have 2 x 110 Round drum magazines that work flawlessly.
Its an awesome plinker.
Lol, those drums were expensive to fill not that long ago!

I still have a hard time not buying .22 ammo every time I see it!
 
Beautiful parcel of land! Great, too that you're teaching your kids how to shoot. I've got the Mossberg 464 Lever Action - it was the cheapest .22 lever action I could find & is mechanically identical to the Henry. Henry's boost in price is the fact that they use some darned NICE walnut on their rifles, while the Mossberg has a beech stock stained in the most economical fashion possible (I'll refinish it someday). Shot mine side-by-side with a Henry shooter & the accuracy between the 2 is identical (taking into account the other young shooters' developing skill level.

That Stevens Favorite: I got one at a gunshow earlier this year. Someone goobered up the wood, so it needed to be stripped & restained + it was missing a buttplate. Keep in mind that these rifles were made long ago and ONLY USE .22 Standard Velocity ammo! I plink with mine in the back yard at oranges on the tree using Aguila Colibri ammo - VERY Quiet!

My first .22 was a family heirloom Springfield M1922A1 passed down to my Dad from an uncle who got it directly thru the CMP around 1935. My Boy Scout Troop in the 60's was filled with Dads with guns and we had opportunity for unlimited weekend range time. We all got our Marksmanship Meritbadge, plus the NRA Marksmanship medals (which we proudly wore on our uniforms. The Springfield was good for prone & sitting, but way too big for me for standing, so Dad got me a Browning T-Bolt. It finished up my medals qualifications. I still have it today & it is still a tack driver.

I ended up with 2 Rossi pumps & they're also tack drivers (especially with standard velocity target ammo!
 
I kinda figured that, but why would anyone think that is a waste of time? It surely can't hurt anything.
Lapping, properly done, is effective in breaking in larger caliber rifles made decades ago. Modern manufacturing, especially button rifling, makes lapping unnecessary. Lap a custom cut-rifing centerfire barrel; leave a .22 barrel alone. You can round off sharp edges in the shallow rifled .22 barrels too easily, and unless yoiu're a serious competitive shooter scoring your targets with a micrometer, you won'be likely good enough to tell the difference ...
 

FarmerTan

George Bailey Fanboy
Lapping, properly done, is effective in breaking in larger caliber rifles made decades ago. Modern manufacturing, especially button rifling, makes lapping unnecessary. Lap a custom cut-rifing centerfire barrel; leave a .22 barrel alone. You can round off sharp edges in the shallow rifled .22 barrels too easily, and unless yoiu're a serious competitive shooter scoring your targets with a micrometer, you won'be likely good enough to tell the difference ...
Thanks for the clarification my friend!
 

nortac

"Can't Raise an Eyebrow"
Contributor
How do you like the Burris FastFire III? I have a 22/45 on the way. I’m looking for a fun plinking red dot sight.
Works very well for the money. Be sure to get the mount that replaces the rear sight so that it sits as low to the bore as possible. My 22/45 does not have the rear sight, so my FastFire must ride the rail, a bit high for my liking, but it works.
 
Top Bottom