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Yardley from an antique store

My lovely sig-O and I were meandering through an antique store to cap off our Memorial Day Weekend mini-vacation. Upstairs, on a shelf, I spotted a little covered bowl and thought, "Wouldn't it be cool if that were an old soap?" Well, it was a bowl of Yardley and when I picked it up, I knew - it wasn't empty. I took the top off and gave it a sniff. I expected nothing, but instead of nothing, it still had a very nice and potent bouquet!

I called my sig-O over and asked her to smell it. She liked it and asked if I planned to buy it.

"Oh, no. You know I'm in a restraint. I'll come back next month and if it's still here, I'll get it."

"Don't be silly. I'll just buy it for you."

And just like that, I'm the owner of a bowl of vintage Yardley.

However...I'm not sure how best to use it. The bowl itself is really dry and I'm thinking of dressing it up with some mineral oil. The soap, though, is probably also fairly dry, though the fact that there's still scent gives me hope.

What's my best plan here? Soak the puck for some time (how long?) or just go at it like any other soap? And for "dressing" the bowl, I think I could do the outside, the lip, and the lip of the lid, but I don't want to mess up the labels. Thoughts?

Thanks!

As an aside, the bowl apparently belonged to the father of the (older) lady running the store. She just couldn't bear to part with it for years, until recently. At least it has a good new home.

$Yardley_label.jpg

$Yardley_open_2.jpg
 
Yep that's the good stuff. I've had some pretty good luck in antique stores lately, including one of those old Currier and Ives Williams bowls, unused for $2.50. These types of finds are out there, you just have to be diligent. Congratulations on your good luck!
 
Congratulations on that. Try just lathering like you would any modern soap, but if you're unsuccessful and not one of the 'bloomers' try that next.
 
Congrats! I found one this weekend as well, but, sadly, mine was empty...No worries, it gave me the chance to put about 10 coats of clear on it to make sure it would last forever :)
 
Wow. Nice score. The label and the bowl are in great condition, too! I think it's pretty rare to come across one that pristine in an antique store.
 
Thanks, guys. $5 well spent (by my girlfriend)!

SOTD:
1966 Gillette Flare Tip
Personna Red (1)
2015 Sue Moore Boar
Yardley of London
Thayer's WH w/aloe
Lucky Tiger Face Tonic
Stirling SDM ASB
Clubman Original AS

This was my first shave with the Yardley. But, hey, I only got it yesterday! Anyway, I was careful with the amount of water that I used to soak it, because I didn't want to get the internal label wet. When I got out of the shower, the puck had sucked up at least half of the water. I loaded for about 20 seconds and face-lathered. What a nice lather, with a great scent. Unfortunately, there was just enough for one pass and the rest dissipated fairly quickly, but that one pass (with touch-up) was fully sufficient for SAS, and the post-shave face-feel is great. I'll load a bit longer tomorrow and try for two passes.

Wow, that is a great find. I'd probably only bring that soap out for special shave occassions and make sure it lasted as long as possible.

I have to say, I'm torn between this and the idea of 3017-ing the soap. It's really nice, and I love shaving with pieces of history (vintage razors, brushes and now soap), but whereas the others will last, this will not. Maybe it will become my "Sunday Soap"...after I've used it a few more times. :laugh:
 
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The second shave with the vintage Yardley soap was even better than the first. I let the soap soak in a small amount of water overnight in the hope that it would rehydrate the puck at least a little bit. It seems to have helped, because loading was easier and more effective, and I got enough great lather for 2.5 passes. After this, though, I think I'm going to put it away for a while and use it sparingly.
 
The second shave with the vintage Yardley soap was even better than the first. I let the soap soak in a small amount of water overnight in the hope that it would rehydrate the puck at least a little bit. It seems to have helped, because loading was easier and more effective, and I got enough great lather for 2.5 passes. After this, though, I think I'm going to put it away for a while and use it sparingly.

Sounds like a very good plan - if it is not easy to replace, it would be a shame to use it up in one go.
 
As I mentioned, the wood of the bowl was pretty dry. I slathered it with mineral oil tonight, just in the hope that it would help the wood last longer and not crack. Once it's dried, I'll take some more pics to show the "after".

I noticed that the lid has a bit of a bow to it and it doesn't really sit flush on the bowl unless it's turned juuuuust right. Is that normal for vintage soap bowls?
 
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