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Wine Recomendations

I'm pretty new to wines, but I do like wine, Cabernet Sauvignon in particular. This past Saturday I had a bottle of Canyon Road at an upscale steakhouse, and thus far it has been the bes wine I've had. I'm looking for some recomendations on other wines to try. I'd like to keep the price around $30-$40 per bottle. I'm willing to increas this price range for a special occasion. But I'm starting to see every day as a special occasion :biggrin:
 

ouch

Stjynnkii membörd dummpsjterd
I'll sell you this one for $40.
full

Of course, a full one is a few dollars more. :001_rolle

The only way to learn wine is to taste your way around the world. Only then will you know if that $30-40 bottle is world class or no better than a $10 bottle.

I'd suggest starting with the Languedoc-Roussillon area of France.
 
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Find a good wine shop in your area with a knowledgeable staff and pick their brains.

+1. I know very little about wine, but I know a few particular labels I like. So when I'm looking for something a little different I drop in to my local shop and tell them what I like and how much I want to spend and they never fail to get a perfect bottle. I've done the same thing with food pairings: bring in a menu and walk out with a perfect bottle for each course.
 
This is a HUGE subject. The best thing for me when learning wines was to be able to recognize what I like. Much like being able to recognize the grain of your beard improved your shave, being able to recognize wine qualities that you like will improve your wine experience. Even within a particular style, (in your case Cab Sav) there are huge differences between bottlings.

Things that are of note: Fruit: Do you like more or less pronounced fruit flavors? Sweet/Dry: Obviously, sweeter or not? Tannins: That sharp, "pucker factor" that you get on the finish. Weight: Heavy, bold wines, or light? Oak: how much oak, vanilla has the wine received from aging in wood?

Once you can describe what you like, you will be able to communicate this to any knowledgeable purveyor/steward/sommelier. Then, knowing what you like, next will come regions that you will suit your likes and those that don't. Within those regions, then will come styles. Within those styles, then will come vintages.

This is a wonderful and very rewarding journey you've begun, my friend. Enjoy it like any other grand journey you've embarked upon. Enjoy the scenery and the experience, don't get too caught up with what road you happen to be on at the moment, or worry about your final destination.
 
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If you like cabernets, there are many excellent California cabernets well under your target price. Bevmo and Trader Joe's are great stores for wine. There are quite a few very good Napa Valley wines in the twenty and under price range. I live in California and support local wineries whenever i can. I seldom spend over ten dollars for an everyday wine. Try as many as you can.
 
I recommend Musgo Real. And it smells good, too. :wink:

Seriously, good for you getting into wine! I'm a huge red wine fan but consider myself a rank novice. As others have said, take it slow, figure out the tastes you like, find a store with a knowledgeable staff that you trust and most of all, enjoy yourself!
 
Find a good wine shop in your area with a knowledgeable staff and pick their brains.

+1. And remember that higher price doesn't always = better wine. Also, if you've time and inclination, take a vacation (even a weekend) to an area that has lots of wineries conducting tastings. We've learned a ton about what wines we do and don't enjoy this way, and gotten to know some wonderful winemakers along the way. Frankly, I'd recommend New York State, Niagara (especially for whites), or my personal favorite, Virginia, over Napa not so much because of better quality, but because of a far less expensive and less touristy feel.

Enjoy the journey!
 
Thanks guys! I knew you wouldn't let me down. I have a starting point at least. Now I just have to find a good wine shop in the area. I'm looking forward to the journey and to knowing that knowledge and wisdom are gained from experiance.

There are some good $10 wines out there. I've had some of those too. I just can't remember what they were, so I'll just have to find them again.
 
My favorite Sonoma wineries were you can find some great wine for around $30 are

1) Lambert Bridge
2) Ridge
3) Wilson- if you like Zins
4) Dutcher Crossing
5) Stryker
6) Segehsio
 
Go to:

http://tv.winelibrary.com/

and enter 'cabernet sauvignon' in the search. Gary knows his stuff and also runs an excellent wine shop (that delivers depending on your state). I would also recommend attending some tastings; these are a fun and economical way to try lots of wines and find out what you really like. Have fun!
 
I work with a French surgeon who is a self-proclaimed "wine snob," and he doesn't like how "oaky" most American wines are. In fact, he only drinks French wines, which talking with him has made me lean more toward the French wines as well. Really, what Ouch said is very true. It is hard to focus on grape type, you also have to consider the region that it was grown in as cabs will taste differently according to where they were grown. The easiest way to learn is to find a friend(s) with a great collection and let them educate you. You'll have a good time, and you'll learn a lot.
 
I'll sell you this one for $40.
full

Of course, a full one is a few dollars more. :001_rolle

The only way to learn wine is to taste your way around the world. Only then will you know if that $30-40 bottle is world class or no better than a $10 bottle.

I'd suggest starting with the Languedoc-Roussillon area of France.

Cheval Blanc reminds me of "Rumpole and the Blind Tasting" where a truck load of it goes missing - only it's not the real thing just an "insurance special".

FWIW, I have had so many dissapointing bottles in the 30-40 (even one recommended by salesmen) range that I usually buy cheaper stuff these days. Young Chilean or California wines that drink pleasantly but are by no means serious stuff.
 
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I'm pretty new to wines, but I do like wine, Cabernet Sauvignon in particular. This past Saturday I had a bottle of Canyon Road at an upscale steakhouse, and thus far it has been the bes wine I've had. I'm looking for some recomendations on other wines to try. I'd like to keep the price around $30-$40 per bottle. I'm willing to increas this price range for a special occasion. But I'm starting to see every day as a special occasion :biggrin:
If you are willing to spend $30-40 for your "house cab," you are going to be drinking some really good wine, even in "NE Georgia"! Sorry for the dig, but as I recall from when my in-laws were living in Alpharetta a decade or so ago, Georgia was not the best when it came to finding good wine for low dollars. it may well have changed for the better. Most places have.

Have you checked out the prices of Canyon Road Cab in retail stores? I think you are going to be real happy with the price if you can find it.

I assume you have Costco's in Georgia, but are they allowed to sell wine there. I think Costco's standard Napa Cab for I think $13 and change in the DC area is a major bargain, and just really good California cab. http://www.costcoconnection.com/connection/ks_wine/?pg=3

Worries me thought that this does not seem to state a year. I am quite sure what I had had a vintage. I think 2006.
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The same is not so true of Costco's more expensive Cali Cab Yountsville. It just is not all that great a wine. Looks like the Yountsville is not longer available. I cannot speak to the Alexander Valley or the Rutherford that apparently in on Costco shelves now. We have had excellent luck with Kirkland brand wines overall.

It may be a minority experience, but we have had relatively little luck with Trader Joes for wines, even though overall I think Trader Joes is wonderful. Too often TJs seems to have oceans of cheap, mediocre wine, that is not worth bothering with. Their $4 Vinho Verde is pretty good, though, as is their remarkably priced King Shag New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc. I cannot think of a TJ red wine to recommend very highly. It may be more me than TJs. Some folks have great luck there.
 
I enjoy wine. My favorite...to date....is actually a fairly cheap one. It's Fetzer's Gewurztraminer - you can get a bottle for about 10 bucks!

It has a very crisp taste or feel on your tongue - it almost feels carbonated.
 

Luc

"To Wiki or Not To Wiki, That's The Question".
The only thing that I can add to this thread that I did not see yet is Spanish wines... I tried over 30 different Spanish wines so far and I had ok to great but never bad wines. Those are quite impressive, specially from Rioja. In Italy they have great wines that are unfortunatly not exported. You still get good stuff from Italy but if you can do a trip over there, it's 2 different worlds! The Lamborghini vineyard is a must!

I am not the biggest fan of French wines (surprisingly) but you would find good stuff in France... As per Jay's comments, Languedoc-Roussillon is great, Bourgogne, Côte du Rhone, pretty much everything south. I like my red wines to by strong and tasty so I would go with a Shiraz/Shyra/Sira/Shira, Pinot Noir (of course), or a Spanish mix with Tempranillo/Grenacha.

I might get bashed on the head but I think Bordeaux is overrated.

In Australia, the wines are great, I love the ones from McLaren valley, Margaret River or Barossa valley! I can get some greats wines here in Victoria (close to Melbourne) but a lot of wineries are so small that you will only be able to buy them at the vineyard... If you are able to drive to a small vineyard I would suggest to do it. They are usually very friendly and you will be able to meet the winemaker and have a chat with him/her.

You do not need to pay a huge amount to get a good wine but you will need to pay a minimum to get a something decent... You will find out by yourself how much that minimum will be...

Argentina/Chile are also awesome and I will end with read the label. If it's not a nice picture, it might be a good read. If the label look bad, it might be good as they do not need to update it for the wine to sell!
 
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Interesting, Luc. I'm so busy trying to learn all of the French wines that I haven't even explored the Spanish wines yet. Looks like I got some tasting to do :biggrin:
 

Luc

"To Wiki or Not To Wiki, That's The Question".
Interesting, Luc. I'm so busy trying to learn all of the French wines that I haven't even explored the Spanish wines yet. Looks like I got some tasting to do :biggrin:

I would recommend Faustino 1 a 1995 or 1996, those are going for $32CDN which isn't so bad for a wine that age, it's one of the best Spanish I had. However, your location is very subjective on what you can access... Good luck!

You can always try this website to find something around you... I use it sometimes.
http://www.wine-searcher.com
 

Doc4

Stumpy in cold weather
I might get bashed on the head but I think Bordeaux is overrated.

:a13:

Not overrated, just overpriced.

Imagine if Penhaligon's wanted $300 per puck of tallow-first English Fern shave soap! Okay, it's still the best soap out there, but at that price ... :blink::blink:

There are many wines out there that are great, but you are also paying for The Name ... for the bad end of supply and demand ... for the Presitge of owning That Wine ...

... but at a fraction of the price you can get really really good wines.



+1 on Spain.

+1 on a minimum price for decent wine. You may luck out on the first year or two of a new 'good' winery, but really, once a winery knows that it's stuff is over that threshold quality-wise, and once the wine-drinkers "in the know" know that too, the prices very quickly rise to that threshold range (at least).
 
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