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Why does this blade take my best edge?

rbscebu

Girls call me Makaluod
I have a Comoy's of London SR that I purchased new last year from a local retailer for about USD 30. Normal cost is about USD 25. Of course it required honing up to my shave-ready standard.

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While honing, I found that the blade's steel was not overly hard, probably about the late 50's RHC. It was very much like a basic Gold Dollar SR. The steel also oxidises fairly easily and needs to be protected soon after each use.

The forging of the blank was a little agricultural. Fortunately, the blade itself has no visible defects.

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I use to think that bevel angle had a lot to do with edge keenness but this blade has a bevel angle of 18.8° and is noticeably keener than my others (Ralf Aust, Colling, Revisor, etc.) that are about 17° or less.

All my SR's are honed about the same; bevel set on synthetic, refined on films and finished on diamond pasted balsa strops to 0.1μm.

I am trying to understand why this Comoy's of London SR takes the keenest of my edges. What are your thoughts?
 
Wrote about this earlier today in the hone section, about how a higher carbon steel easily takes a fabulous edge. I was sharpening my Case pocket knife which has a high carbon blade that people fuss about oxidizing easily. I was cutting a freshly harvested cantaloupe last year and blade started discoloring before I finished sampling the goods. It’s a trade off, but I am willing to accept the additional blade care for the exceptional edge.
 

rbscebu

Girls call me Makaluod
Wrote about this earlier today in the hone section, about how a higher carbon steel easily takes a fabulous edge. I was sharpening my Case pocket knife which has a high carbon blade that people fuss about oxidizing easily. I was cutting a freshly harvested cantaloupe last year and blade started discoloring before I finished sampling the goods. It’s a trade off, but I am willing to accept the additional blade care for the exceptional edge.
So, you are saying that it is the steel type that is the cause of this edge?
 
So, you are saying that it is the steel type that is the cause of this edge?
It sure helps. I can put an amazing edge on high carbon steels with crappy stones. Not so much with some SS and modern tool steels. They will retain an edge for ages, but working a up great edge even with high quality stones is fairly challenging. I usually resort to mechanical diamond and silicon carbide sharpening methods to save time and stone wear. Worst SR shave ever was with a modern SS SR…made for the modern man who can’t be bothered with blade care after a shave.
 
Wrote about this earlier today in the hone section, about how a higher carbon steel easily takes a fabulous edge. I was sharpening my Case pocket knife which has a high carbon blade that people fuss about oxidizing easily. I was cutting a freshly harvested cantaloupe last year and blade started discoloring before I finished sampling the goods. It’s a trade off, but I am willing to accept the additional blade care for the exceptional edge.
I believe this is the answer. I can attest those older Case knives (and other vintage brands such as Old Timer, Dexter Russell, Old Hickory, etc) often have a steel akin to 1095 (I believe many ARE 1095). It is not stainless, and you will get blade patina quickly. Those knives take a WONDERFUL edge, and they do so easily. I have a Dexter Russel green river sheep skinner blade that I can dang near sharpen on the bottom course ring of a coffee cup. And it will shave arm hair effortlessly.

The trade off is those steels usually don't hold an edge as well as some of the modern tooling/stainless steels.
 
I believe this is the answer. I can attest those older Case knives (and other vintage brands such as Old Timer, Dexter Russell, Old Hickory, etc) often have a steel akin to 1095 (I believe many ARE 1095). It is not stainless, and you will get blade patina quickly. Those knives take a WONDERFUL edge, and they do so easily. I have a Dexter Russel green river sheep skinner blade that I can dang near sharpen on the bottom course ring of a coffee cup. And it will shave arm hair effortlessly.

The trade off is those steels usually don't hold an edge as well as some of the modern tooling/stainless steels.
Exactly but it’s lost on the younger generation looking for zero maintenance. They‘ll only know overworked and decent edges.
 

rbscebu

Girls call me Makaluod
I think the steels with lower carbon are easy to hone. But does the edge on your Comoy last over many shaves?
I couldn't say as I happily maintain after every shave on a 0.1μm diamond pasted hanging balsa strop. I might will get another Comoy so as to compare. Then I can include a Comoy's of London SR in one of my n00bie shave-ready SR PIF's.
 
I couldn't say as I happily maintain after every shave on a 0.1μm diamond pasted hanging balsa strop. I might will get another Comoy so as to compare. Then I can include a Comoy's of London SR in one of my n00bie shave-ready SR PIF's.
Well, since it is easy to hone, 0.1μm should keep the edge forever. Just protect from rust.
 
I think the steels with lower carbon are easy to hone. But does the edge on your Comoy last over many shaves?


Ease of honing is mostly dictated by how hard your abrasive is relative to the steel. There are high carbide volume tool steels like D2 which are a nightmare to sharpen on something like an Arkansas stone but put the same thing on diamond and it's as easy as anything else. Most razor steels are hyper-eutectoid with high carbon content and hone up simply and rapidly.
 
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