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Who can name movies or TV shows that have shaving scenes.

Welcome to your worst nightmare:

After a futile morning wait for the elevator that never comes, Smith and his neighbor take the stairs. Guess who is watching?

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In a world where there is ever-increasing production of all their needs, for some mysterious reason there are never any razor blades.

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If you had an extra razor blade, would you share it with your next door neighbor, a co-worker, a friend?

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It never hurts to ask.

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Especially if you know where to ask. The kindly old man, one of the few who ever smiles, runs a junk shop, with some black market goods, too. But why, exactly, is he smiling?

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Smith returns home with his prize:

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A black market razor blade.

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It is a Victory brand razor blade, of course. Every item for sale in his country is a Victory brand.

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He puts his brand new blade in his razor, a relic of the before time, or is it new?

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He is interrupted mid-shave by the morning playing of the national anthem, and must stand at attention, or at least respectfully still.

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And to make sure of his full and eternal obedience, a vigilant helicopter hovers outside his bathroom window.

To be continued....
Outstanding spot! Orwell mentions the razor blade shortage several times in the book. It was written in 1947-8 mostly when things were actually a little worse here than 1939-45. Bread was rationed for a year in 1947, which never happened in the war. He seems to be describing Britain from about 1942 to his death (1949?) Shortages of shoelaces, razorblades, all the small things which are really essential. Also the lack of soap, unwashed clothes and prevalent body odor.

Robert Harris in the great novel 'Enigma', set in early 1943, also touches on the same themes. It was tough here then. We were exhausted in every sense.
 
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FarmerTan

FarmerStan the Man
Outstanding spot! Orwell mentions the razor blade shortage several times in the book. It was written in 1947-8 mostly when things were actually a little worse here than 1939-45. Bread was rationed for a year in 1947, which never happened in the war. He seems to be describing Britain from about 1942 to his death (1949?) Shortages of shoelaces, razorblades, all the small things which are really essential. Also the lack of soap and body odor.

Robert Harris in the great novel 'Enigma', set in early 1943, also touches on the same themes. It was tough here then. We were exhausted in every sense.
We need to pray that history doesn't repeat my friend.

But man (as well as men individually) seems destined to have to take the same tests over and over again until we finally pass.

Thank you for the educational post!
 
Edge of Darkness - Mel Gibson where his daughter appears next to him whilst he is shaving.She proceeds to shave with him using a comb -imitating his every move.

 
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We need to pray that history doesn't repeat my friend.

But man (as well as men individually) seems destined to have to take the same tests over and over again until we finally pass.

Thank you for the educational post!
Well, thanks for that @FarmerTan.

My late Mother was a great resource of memory of those times. A different world. I wanted her to record all her memories at the Imperial War Museum on tape but she never wanted to. But I wrote down and remember a mass of info she told me over the years.

She said things got a lot worse after the massive drawdown of American forces here in 1945-6. The Americans had become friends to our family (we lived near a big U.S.A.A.F base called Bovingdon, just a jeep ride from Hendon where my family lived) and to the whole neighbourhood. It sounded like a complex, family relationship, from 42-45. The older men and officers would go and see my granddad and listen to the BBC Midnight news and talk serious stuff. Other neighbours would come in, and younger guys would be talking with my mum and her brother. It was a hang out place.

The American guys (and female W.A.A.F's) were incredibly generous with food and luxuries, cigarettes, etc. Mum remembered getting boxes of chocolates (Whitman's selection she called them) and the officers would give my Grandad whisky or whatever. The B-17's and 24's would all be flown from the States by way of Greenland to replace losses, and they were mostly loaded with luxuries. Mum only smoked Luckies and Chesterfields. Didn't like Camel. She didn't really like English cigarette for years after.
After the U.S personnel withdrew it became hard on everyone. No soap, MUM deodorant, stuff from the P.X. Everyone felt it.

I was brought up to always remember American generosity and kindness, and how much we owed you.
 
Two that have probably already been mentioned:
Band of Brothers

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Mississippi Burning
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In the spaghetti wester comedy. "My name is nobody" Starring Henry Fonda and Terrance Hill. Fonda goes into a barber shop to get a shave not realizing some bandits had the real barber tied up in the back. When the outlaw pretends to be the barber and lathers up Jack Beauregard (pleyed by Fonda). Before he takes his first stroke with the straight edge, from under the apron he feels Jack's colt barrell pressing against his nuts. A whole gang appears and Fonda takes them all out.
 

FarmerTan

FarmerStan the Man
Well, thanks for that @FarmerTan.

My late Mother was a great resource of memory of those times. A different world. I wanted her to record all her memories at the Imperial War Museum on tape but she never wanted to. But I wrote down and remember a mass of info she told me over the years.

She said things got a lot worse after the massive drawdown of American forces here in 1945-6. The Americans had become friends to our family (we lived near a big U.S.A.A.F base called Bovingdon, just a jeep ride from Hendon where my family lived) and to the whole neighbourhood. It sounded like a complex, family relationship, from 42-45. The older men and officers would go and see my granddad and listen to the BBC Midnight news and talk serious stuff. Other neighbours would come in, and younger guys would be talking with my mum and her brother. It was a hang out place.

The American guys (and female W.A.A.F's) were incredibly generous with food and luxuries, cigarettes, etc. Mum remembered getting boxes of chocolates (Whitman's selection she called them) and the officers would give my Grandad whisky or whatever. The B-17's and 24's would all be flown from the States by way of Greenland to replace losses, and they were mostly loaded with luxuries. Mum only smoked Luckies and Chesterfields. Didn't like Camel. She didn't really like English cigarette for years after.
After the U.S personnel withdrew it became hard on everyone. No soap, MUM deodorant, stuff from the P.X. Everyone felt it.

I was brought up to always remember American generosity and kindness, and how much we owed you.
Thanks again for another wonderful post!

I'm distantly related to Churchill, which is silly of me to be proud of, as one can't choose his ancestors, but I have always considered him the man most responsible for saving the world from tyranny. He is the closest thing, for you folks, to our George Washington, in my opinion. Which, lol, I'm not sure you consider a compliment, but it was certainly meant as one.
 
In the spaghetti wester comedy. "My name is nobody" Starring Henry Fonda and Terrance Hill. Fonda goes into a barber shop to get a shave not realizing some bandits had the real barber tied up in the back. When the outlaw pretends to be the barber and lathers up Jack Beauregard (pleyed by Fonda). Before he takes his first stroke with the straight edge, from under the apron he feels Jack's colt barrell pressing against his nuts. A whole gang appears and Fonda takes them all out.
Does my profile picture remind you of anything?
 
Not Jack...the guy who "killed" him, Terrence Hill.

I grew up watching his movies. He made a bunch of western comedies with Bud Spencer which are ridiculously silly and lots of fun.
The first shave scene is with Fonda and he takes out an entire gang. The last shave scene is with Terrance Hill. You may recall for some reason he's not armed so he jabs his finger in the guys nuts. The movie ends like that and you don't know what happened.
 
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