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What's your coffee today? What brew method? Photos

The Musica came two days ago. Today? A double cappuccino with a milk crema top better than I've had in YEARS. I just have to get out in the garage and start roasting some fresh. Too long I've been accepting ho-hum, so-so, "good enough" pond swill! I didn't remember until I did! I'm a believer.
So, what you are saying it is well worth doing your own roasting?
 
Nice percolator, it looks almost brand new. I like how you captured the reflection without being in the shot.
Someone posted some pictures from an event I attended and I noticed a member of my favorite band from youth in the background. I marked out majorly. He and author Chris Hitchens went on a major discussion on the sorry state of tea in the US at a later event.
 
Today’s brew:

20 grams Onyx Costa Rica Las Lajas Slow Dried Natural ground using Baratza Encore set to #10.

Hario V60 02 glass with the white 02 filter.

300 grams 204F water

Used James Hoffman V60 ultimate brew guide.

Yield: 255 grams

The resulting cup was sweet and had the strawberry taste.

Best consumed before it gets cold.

Awesome.
 
So, what you are saying it is well worth doing your own roasting?
Hi! @GBerry It took me a couple of days to clearly see what I really wanted to say in answer to your question. I kind of read it as a challenge to approach. To see a mental gate, decide if I was going to leave it closed and stand on one side, open it and let it swing freely back and forth, or go through it and take the other side closing it once again.

The simple answer is Yes, well worth learning how to roast, experience the process, explore the things which come of its nature and those which might come out of the left field. And that's all about personally roasting! Adding to this one current retail market has most of their fresh raw coffee stock available for purchase 5 to 7 USD per pound. This can offer results anywhere from bathwater to (potentially more often) god-shots and delicious drinks. All far less than paying a retail roaster and having to first learn what you like and then coming into your experience of how your brewing experience can change/improve it. If you have the time and inclination a real return on investment can be had for the difference in price for commercial roast coffees, especially those which are top tier.

I'm saying you can get what you pay for. But sometimes, the value can be appreciated when you invest a bit of that energy exchange in labor and tools rather than just giving someone else silver for your entertainment.
 
So, what you are saying it is well worth doing your own roasting?
Hi! @GBerry It took me a couple of days to clearly see what I really wanted to say in answer to your question. I kind of read it as a challenge to approach. To see a mental gate, decide if I was going to leave it closed and stand on one side, open it and let it swing freely back and forth, or go through it and take the other side closing it once again.

The simple answer is Yes, well worth learning how to roast, experience the process, explore the things which come of its nature and those which might come out of the left field. And that's all about personally roasting! Adding to this one current retail market has most of their fresh raw coffee stock available for purchase 5 to 7 USD per pound. This can offer results anywhere from bathwater to (potentially more often) god-shots and delicious drinks. All far less than paying a retail roaster and having to first learn what you like and then coming into your experience of how your brewing experience can change/improve it. If you have the time and inclination a real return on investment can be had for the difference in price for commercial roast coffees, especially those which are top tier.

I'm saying you can get what you pay for. But sometimes, the value can be appreciated when you invest a bit of that energy exchange in labor and tools rather than just giving someone else silver for your entertainment.
First, thanks for the thoughtful reply.

Second, I’m slowly coming to the same conclusion. I have been looking at roasters and checking what others have been doing. I have read hundreds of blog posts in the last 2 weeks. Potentially I know less today than I thought I did 2 weeks ago when I picked up this rabbit trail.

I may have to just try things.
 
Roaring Stag Burundi Rubanda Gomvyi coffee poured thorugh my SwissGold filter. It's described as "flavours of creamed caramel, sweet toffee and cherry flaow through to create complex flavours of black current cherry and forest fruits". I'm not sure I get all of that, but it makes a nice cup of coffee 🤣
 
I'm drinking New Mexico Pinon Nut coffee. Since it's a work day, it's in my Mr. Coffee machine, but it tastes awesome any way I make it. It makes my southwestern heart happy.
 
Today was 15g of 'Guadalupe' from my favourite roaster - Quarter Horse Coffee in Birmingham, UK. Ground quite fine and put through an Aeropress, about 180 ml of 80degC water steeped for about 2min. Lovely smooth fruity stuff. Still tastes sweet now, an hour after the last sip :)
 
This is coffee roasted in Switzerland, but bought in a German supermarket. Swiss coffee counts as good here in Europe - "Schüümli" means "crema."


P1050556.JPG P1050555.JPG
 
For me, today was the start of dialing in a new espresso setup!

Buzzopolis coffee from Whole Latte Love.

Gaggia Classic Pro
Eureka Mignon Instantaneo grinder

first shot was too fast (~12 seconds)
second was a little too slow (~40 seconds)

even the "bad" shots were pretty good!
 
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28 grams dark roasted Tarrazu, 500 grams filtered water yields me 15 ounces of what I consider the perfect brew. Have a great day. DSCI0918.JPG
 
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