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What’s with Creed Aventus?

I buy samples of expensive stuff (like Creed scents) before throwing money into a full-size. It's saved me hundreds as there are some that just don't smell good on me. I'm currently debating the Aventus purchase as it's one of the better ones. However, even though I really liked Bois Du Protugal, but found the Guerlain's Heritage gave me the same vibe and cost about $200 less.
Welcome to the club - Guerlain's Heritage is a phenomenal scent. If you are looking for a real classy and sophisticated fragrance you cannot go wrong with Heritage.

Tim
 
I love Aventus, which is all I need to wear it, but it doesn't hurt, to say the least, that I get way more compliments on that than any other. Mostly from women.

On the other hand, Green Irish Tweed is a fragrance I find just ok at best, but also gets compliments, though not nearly as many as Aventus.

C
 
I love Aventus. I first tried it at Saks as a sample when it was brand new and was totally blown away. One of the few scents that I'll shell out that kind of coin for.
 
+1

There is a reason why some of the fragrances have been going strong for several decades, some even 100+ years, while costing what many would consider a "small fortune". And the reason is very simple - there will always be enough conscious buyers who don't mind paying the premium price for the premium quality merchandise. Yours truly included.
Such as?
 
I purchased it and thought that the smell was really wonderful. However, it just did not work with my skin type as it lasted, at most, all of about fifteen minutes. I simply was not going to keep respraying it at its very expensive price. Therefore it was not worth it for my purposes.
 
I love the first two. Will have to check out the third!
You won't regret it. Their scents are a little different from Floris and Penhaligon, which I think is a good thing. Most of their scents are on the unisex end of the spectrum,, but several are on the manly side. Most guys seem to prefer Tam Dao (manly/woody sandalwood+cedar), Eau des Sens (fresh neroli+juniper) and Phylosikos (warm fig+fern). I own and enjoy the first two and they filled a gap in my den beautifully. Whatever you choose, the scents are all super high quality. I would however counsel you to stay away from the very most recent scents like Eau de Menthe because I think those are lower quality fashion fragrances. The onky exception is "Tempo" which I like quite a bit.
 
It is the Ferrari of fragrances. From the opening to skin scent, it is a hell of a pleasurable experience. That smoky pinaple with hints of ambergris will get you compliments for sure but that's not the reason to buy it. It smells very good, performs well and it's very versitile.
Please don't buy a bottle of this. A 10 ml decant will satisfy most people and there is no need to use such an expensive fragrance every day or too often.
 
Like most Creeds it’s well put together with high quality ingredients, nice packaging. In addition to making generally good stuff, Creed has Rolex’s knack of always being somehow relevant to people with disposable income - they‘re niche but have a big footprint. Aventus filled a space and it’s decent enough. Personally, I like their older offerings: Windsor, Bois du Portugal and Vintage Tabarome for example. Aventus just doesn’t do it for me.
 
The original question was, "what is so special about it?"

I think what is really special about it is that it has been hugely successful, and smells not only really good, but also hip, fresh in the sense of being different, and cutting edge to a vast cross-section of the population. I would say that somehow Creed hit on a scent that for the time really took elements of other scents that we then very popular and built on them to create something that seemed ahead of its time in 2010, or, perhaps seemed like the next new thing, perhaps where scents were naturally going, when it was released. It helps that women in particular seem to really like the scent, which is something a lot of guys are looking for in a scent.....

....Also, in 2020 it seems to be kind of played out.....
^^^^^^^^^^^^^This.

Personally, I dig the bottle of Aventus that I have, which is a 2013 batch. Is it my favorite fragrance in my collection? No, but that's because I generally prefer fragrances from the 1960's - 1980's. But the "smokey pineapple" Aventus works very well for me, especially in the autumn months, lasts all day, is constantly evolving in the long dry down, and my wife approves, as does our daughter. Will I buy another bottle when this one runs out? Depends when that is. If it's in the next 5 years or so, probably not, because it's been cloned to death and hyped to the "nth degree" for too long, and it's quite commonplace now. But I still like it. Do I like enough to pay full retail price? No, but the discount fragrance sites always have good deals for about half the retail price (for Creed fragrances in general - and yes, they're legit bottles), and at that price point, I think it's worth it - but that's me.

Bottom line, sample it and judge for yourself.
 
Just off the top of my head, here are a few fragrances that are about 100 years old (or more) and still on the market:

Houbigant Fougere Royale (1882)
Guerlain Jicky (1889)
Guerlain Mouchoir du Monsieur (1904)
Chanel No. 5 (1921)
Guerlain Shalimar (1925)
 
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Just off the top of my head, here are a few fragrances that are about 100 years old (or more) and still on the market:

Houbigant Fougere Royale (1882)
Guerlain Jicky (1889)
Guerlain Mouchoir du Monsieur (1904)
Chanel No. 5 (1921)
Guerlain Shalimar (1925)
The first one was definitely reformulated as the company was dornant for several years. Most fragrances are reformulated over time, at least you didn't quote any 19th century dates for Creed.
 
The first one was definitely reformulated as the company was dornant for several years. Most fragrances are reformulated over time, at least you didn't quote any 19th century dates for Creed.
A few of many Creeds:

Royal Scottish Lavender 1856
Santal Imperial 1850
Royal English Leather 1781
Bois de Cedrat is mid-1800s, wore it a couple of days ago.

Almost certainly all reformulated to meet EU regs and because some ingredients just can’t be found at any price now.
 
A few of many Creeds:

Royal Scottish Lavender 1856
Santal Imperial 1850
Royal English Leather 1781
Bois de Cedrat is mid-1800s, wore it a couple of days ago.

Almost certainly all reformulated to meet EU regs and because some ingredients just can’t be found at any price now.
:lol:
 

emwolf

Contributor
Just off the top of my head, here are a few fragrances that are about 100 years old (or more) and still on the market:

Houbigant Fougere Royale (1882)
Guerlain Jicky (1889)
Guerlain Mouchoir du Monsieur (1904)
Chanel No. 5 (1921)
Guerlain Shalimar (1925)
Caswell Massey Jockey Club
 
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