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What's on your work bench right now?

Wow, those are nicer scales than I am used to seeing on a Japanese razor!
It’s the main reason why I purchased it. I kept looking at it and then passing by it and coming back to it because of the scales. They are the original scales to the blade. I hope it shaves as good as it looks, it is my first Japanese razor.

Larry
 
It’s the main reason why I purchased it. I kept looking at it and then passing by it and coming back to it because of the scales. They are the original scales to the blade. I hope it shaves as good as it looks, it is my first Japanese razor.

Larry
I have 4 Japanese razors. All are good and two are among my best.
 
I finally finished the Wade & Butcher Magnum Bonum that I posted about two weeks ago:


I ended up learning a lot on this one (especially about cleaning up etching and pinning/peening) and am happy with the results.
 

RumpleBearskin

Contributor
Like an idiot I broke the bone scales on my CVH MK No. 22, so today baby is getting a new dress.
PXL_20210531_235536376.jpg
First time working with bone. Smelly stuff when you are working it with power tools.

The picture is after cut out and rough shaping with a Dremel cutting wheel and sanding drums. Still have the hand sanding progression to do then drill, pin, and peen.

I'm thinking maybe a dark horn wedge for contrast?
 
Swapped out the cheap faux marble scales that came on this Gold Dollar and repurposed some scales I thought might work. Happy with the end result. Mostly...
3721CC3D-B03F-40F0-B7B5-E076EAAE596D.jpeg
 
Like an idiot I broke the bone scales on my CVH MK No. 22, so today baby is getting a new dress.
View attachment 1275070
First time working with bone. Smelly stuff when you are working it with power tools.

The picture is after cut out and rough shaping with a Dremel cutting wheel and sanding drums. Still have the hand sanding progression to do then drill, pin, and peen.

I'm thinking maybe a dark horn wedge for contrast?
I think that will look sharp. I just started working on a black horn wedge today. I’m using a blank that has too much warp down its length to be used for a scale.
 

RumpleBearskin

Contributor
Finally got the CVH rescaled.

Initial shaping:
PXL_20210531_235536376.jpg
Modern bone scales to replace the antique bone ones that were on it.

Fitting the wedge:
PXL_20210603_010633386.jpg
Burned the horn trying to flatten the blank. Cheap wooden wedge. At least it's functional.

Back together again:
PXL_20210603_032931860.jpg

Quick touch up on the Les Lat:
PXL_20210603_021217524.jpg

Shave test tomorrow...
 
I’ve had this Lecollier a Nogent for a few months. It came with a set of scales that didn’t quite fit right (the blade toe was hitting the wedge). So I transferred the scales to another razor with a slightly shorter blade. Then I made a new set of scales from cow horn. I’m still a rookie at this, and there were multiple things I wish I had done better (top of list, remember to use backing material when drilling in horn). But got it done, now on to the honing. Before and after photos below. FD6F20C8-0A87-4D96-971F-D18284BC00B3.jpeg 2E0A415A-2376-4B8E-B813-DD6AE71ACBCA.jpeg 7FF5A52F-34C9-4A5E-8C49-1589A5AFC1B8.jpeg 89E5C1F0-E5BB-409A-AEBC-675126E04A10.jpeg
 
My first time removing plastic scales and first real screwup! After filing the mushroom head and washer off this Dorko 43, I tried to gently pry the scales apart using a small screwdriver and BAM! My first thought was to reach out to someone about a rescaling but then I realized that perhaps this was a message from the gods of vintage straight razor restoration that I need to learn how to make scales, so that's the plan. I think I will start with 1/8 inch sheets of black and white acrylic using hand tools, and see where things go. I even managed to put a hairline fracture (toxic inclusion) in the top scale.

In the meantime, should I try to epoxy or superglue the cracked scales or are they just toast?

I should add that after cracking the scales, I did successfully remove the remaining pins by gently tapping them out with a long 1/16 inch punch. The pins were way tighter than I expected. Turns out I could have just cleaned up the blade without removing it from the scales. Too late now. I can also see the value in having a small drill press. And no more screw drivers anywhere near my razors.

20210613_184530645_iOS.jpg

After getting a few Sheffield near wedges, I thought it would be fun to get a post WWII near wedge, and then I found this Dorko 43. The good news is that I did get the blade cleaned up. There was a lot of pitting on the top of the blade above the spine, and more than I wanted on the faces, so I sacrificed the etching for a clean look. I don't see this razor in the trophy case.

Before.

01.01.jpg

After the wet/dry sandpaper, steel wool and Mothers polish.

20210613_183912598_iOS.jpg
 
My first time removing plastic scales and first real screwup! After filing the mushroom head and washer off this Dorko 43, I tried to gently pry the scales apart using a small screwdriver and BAM! My first thought was to reach out to someone about a rescaling but then I realized that perhaps this was a message from the gods of vintage straight razor restoration that I need to learn how to make scales, so that's the plan. I think I will start with 1/8 inch sheets of black and white acrylic using hand tools, and see where things go. I even managed to put a hairline fracture (toxic inclusion) in the top scale.

In the meantime, should I try to epoxy or superglue the cracked scales or are they just toast?

I should add that after cracking the scales, I did successfully remove the remaining pins by gently tapping them out with a long 1/16 inch punch. The pins were way tighter than I expected. Turns out I could have just cleaned up the blade without removing it from the scales. Too late now. I can also see the value in having a small drill press. And no more screw drivers anywhere near my razors.

View attachment 1281210

After getting a few Sheffield near wedges, I thought it would be fun to get a post WWII near wedge, and then I found this Dorko 43. The good news is that I did get the blade cleaned up. There was a lot of pitting on the top of the blade above the spine, and more than I wanted on the faces, so I sacrificed the etching for a clean look. I don't see this razor in the trophy case.

Before.

View attachment 1281211

After the wet/dry sandpaper, steel wool and Mothers polish.

View attachment 1281212
Hi Frank,
No harm in trying to fix. I successfully fixed a similar crack on the horn scales on my Chadwick. It likely was already cracked clean thru, but it came apart as I drilled out the pin. I did use a cheat - after gluing the broken piece back on I also glued on an internal washer (plastic) to reinforce the joint. Then when I reassembled I made sure to include a non-glued washer on the other side. It held together through the repinning, the honing, and a few shaves so far.
 
In the meantime, should I try to epoxy or superglue the cracked scales or are they just toast?
Busted at the pivot pin is probably the worst spot possible due to the pressure of the pivot pin to hold the razor closed and flex opening and closing. You might be able to get away repairing but probably better off with new scales. If unsure, ask yourself this question: Would you rather fix the old scales and OK if they break again while repinning or using and you have to do it again, or are you only wanting to do this once?

Sorry about the cracked scale. First, any time you feel you need to pry a scale…….prepare to crack it. I’m telling you, prying it is when you are most likely to bust one. Better way next time would be to file flat, center punch, then drill it out. Even then can be tricky not to crack one, but normally that loosens them up enough to get some twist and movement. A jewelers saw can sometimes fit between scale and blade and you can slowly cut the pin and push out backwards too. Have to find what works for you and the razor at the time.

Good luck!
 
The decision has been made - I am going to learn how to make scales, starting with 1/8 inch acrylic. Can anyone point me to a good choice for double-sided tape?
 
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